Trout Lake (British Columbia)

Last updated
Trout Lake
Trout Lake winter.JPG
Trout Lake in mid-February
Canada British Columbia relief location map.jpg
Red pog.svg
Trout Lake
Location British Columbia
Coordinates 50°34′58″N117°25′20″W / 50.5828°N 117.4222°W / 50.5828; -117.4222 Coordinates: 50°34′58″N117°25′20″W / 50.5828°N 117.4222°W / 50.5828; -117.4222
Type ribbon lake
Basin  countriesCanada

Trout Lake is a ribbon lake in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. Between the Selkirk Mountains to the west and the Purcell Mountains to the east, the lake is about 23 kilometres (14 mi) long and 1.6 kilometres (1 mi) wide. Lardeau Creek flows into the northern end and Lardeau River flows from the southern end. [1] BC Highway 31 skirts the northeast shore. The northern end is about 90 kilometres (56 mi) by road and ferry southeast of Revelstoke.

Contents

Name origin

In 1865, explorer James Turnbull noted in his diary a journey beside Lake de Truite, but did not indicate how he knew the lake's French name, only that the waters abounded in trout. No Sinixt or Ktunaxa name existed. The lake is labelled Lac des Truites on an 1871 map, Lardo Lake on an 1890 map, and Trout Lake in an 1889 newspaper article (which highlighted the immense size of the trout). [2]

Mining

Although mining claims have surrounded the lake, [3] the predominance of mining activity has been near Ferguson and Trout Lake at the northern end. [4] The discovery of the Great Northern and Silver Cup mineral claims led to extensive prospecting from 1890 onward. [5]

In 1891, trails for miners were completed southeastward from Upper Arrow Lake [6] and northwestward from Kootenay Lake. [7] By the next year, horse packtrains operated from Thomson's Landing (Beaton). [8] A sleigh road existed during the winter months. [9] In 1893, packtrains commenced from Lardo (Lardeau). [10]

In 1894, wagon road construction from Lardo almost reached Trout Lake City [11] and from Thomson's Landing was 6 kilometres (4 mi) short of the town. [12] The next summer, the road through the settlement was completed, [13] [14] replacing the packtrains with four-horse wagon teams. [15] Over time, deterioration left only the Thomson's Landing road passable. Prior to the railway, inward journeys to the lake carried supplies, and the outward ones ore. [16]

The Broadview, the Silver Cup, the Nettie Lake, and Ajax were the more significant properties. [17] (See mining maps). [18] [19] By 1908, only the Silver Cup remained operational, [20] ceasing production in 1914. The True Fissure and Blue Bell developed 1916–1939. Sporadic mining occurred in the area during the 1940s and 1950s. [17]

The area experienced only limited production after the early years, but interest in development continues. [21]

Transportation

In 1898, a steamboat service was introduced. [22] The next year, a new wharf was completed at Trout Lake City [23] and the survey crews from rival railway companies either chartered the steamboat or acquired available boats. [24] The steamboat ran a regular service up and down the lake. [25]

For years, the Canadian Pacific Railway (CP), under the Arrowhead and Kootenay Railway (or Kootenay and Arrowhead) banner, conducted a charade indicating a Lardeau–Arrowhead line was imminent, purely to block the Kaslo and Slocan Railway, a Great Northern Railway subsidiary, from constructing along the route. [26] The scheme included buying a third of the unsold lots at Trout Lake City. [27] Such land sales by railway companies contributed significantly to track construction costs.

On completion in June 1902, the contractor initially operated the Lardo (Lardeau)–Gerrard line, [28] and a lake boat connected with Trout Lake City. [29] That August, CP commenced a three-times weekly Lardo–Trout Lake City rail/lake service. [30] The 1,000-ton ore stockpile [31] was completely removed by month end. [32] The CP warehouses had accumulated the product since January. [33] Even Revelstoke freight followed the new circuitous route via Nelson. [34]

However, when winter ice closed the lake route, [35] the original wagon road via Beaton provided a rudimentary and only access. [36] CP were able to keep a channel open on the lake for the 1903/04 winter, [37] but the usual winter closure was two to three months. [38]

From 1904, a CP tug towed a six-car barge, which took the railway cars down the lake. [39] Delivering the tug by rail from Lardo had proved challenging, because the breadth clearances were overly tight. [40]

CP did not recommence ferry service in 1916 after the spring thaw. [41] The rail service reduced to a locomotive and rolling stock barged in weekly from the Kaslo line. [42] That August, the shingle mill leased the CP vessel and established a connecting weekly passenger/freight run. [43]

A rail link to the north end of the lake never eventuated. The Lardeau–Gerrard line closed in 1942. [44]

Recreation

The presence of large rainbow trout, bull trout, and burbot cater to fishing. Hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, and snowmobiling are popular on the trails throughout the surrounding hills. [45]

See also

Footnotes

  1. "Trout Lake (lake)". BC Geographical Names.
  2. "Castlegar News, 12 Oct 2017". www.castlegarnews.com.
  3. "Miner, 17 Jun 1893". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 2.
  4. Fyles & Eastwood 1962, p. 7 (8).
  5. Fyles & Eastwood 1962, p. 10 (11).
  6. "Kootenay Star, 11 Jul 1891". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 1.
  7. "Miner, 5 Sep 1891". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 1.
  8. "Kootenay Star, 2 Jul 1892". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 1.
  9. "Kootenay Mail, 19 May 1894". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 2.
  10. "Tribune, 20 Apr 1893". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 4.
  11. "Kootenay Mail, 1 Dec 1894". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 2.
  12. "Kootenay Mail, 9 Feb 1895". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 2.
  13. "Kootenay Mail, 6 Jul 1895". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 1.
  14. "Ledge, 18 Jul 1895". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 8.
  15. "Kootenay Mail, 27 Jul 1895". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 1.
  16. "Revelstoke Herald, 27 May 1899". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 3.
  17. 1 2 Fyles & Eastwood 1962, p. 11 (12).
  18. "Revelstoke Herald, 15 May 1897". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 3.
  19. "Eagle, 14 Feb 1900". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 2.
  20. "Daily News, 3 Jan 1909". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 32.
  21. "BC Local News, 9 Nov 2020". www.bclocalnews.com.
  22. "Tribune, 30 Jul 1898". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 1.
  23. "Kootenay Mail, 27 May 1899". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 2.
  24. "Revelstoke Herald, 14 Jun 1899". www.library.ubc.ca. pp. 1, 4.
  25. "Kootenay Mail, 22 Jul 1899". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 1.
  26. "Kootenay Mail, 22 Mar 1901". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 3.
  27. "Revelstoke Herald, 13 Apr 1901". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 1.
  28. "Daily News, 5 Jun 1902". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 1.
  29. "Daily News, 17 Jul 1902". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 4.
  30. "Daily News, 1 Aug 1902". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 4.
  31. "Daily News, 6 Aug 1902". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 4.
  32. "Nelson Tribune, 30 Aug 1902". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 1.
  33. "Kootenay Mail, 3 Jan 1902". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 2.
  34. "Daily News, 21 Jun 1902". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 4.
  35. "Daily News, 21 Apr 1903". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 4.
  36. "Kootenay Mail, 11 Apr 1903". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 3.
  37. "Daily News, 27 Feb 1904". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 2.
  38. "Slocan Mining Review, 5 Nov 1908". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 1.
  39. "Daily News, 22 Jul 1904". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 1.
  40. "Daily News, 27 Jul 1904". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 1.
  41. "Daily News, 20 May 1916". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 5.
  42. "Daily News, 27 Mar 1916". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 5.
  43. "Daily News, 26 Aug 1916". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 7.
  44. Meyer, Ronald Howard (1967). "The Evolution of Railways in the Kootenays". www.open.library.ubc.ca. pp. 34, 69 (27, 62).
  45. "Trout Lake". www.ourbc.com.

Related Research Articles

Rogers Pass (British Columbia) Mountain pass in British Columbia, Canada

Rogers Pass is a high mountain pass through the Selkirk Mountains of British Columbia, but the term also includes the approaches used by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) and the Trans-Canada Highway. In the heart of Glacier National Park, this tourism destination since 1886 is a National Historic Site.

The Columbia and Kootenay Railway (C&KR) was a historic railway operated by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) in the West Kootenay region of British Columbia. This 25-mile (40 km) route, beside the unnavigable Kootenay River, linked Nelson on the west arm of Kootenay Lake with Robson at the confluence of the Kootenay River and the Columbia River near Castlegar.

The Nakusp and Slocan Railway (N&S) is a historic Canadian railway that operated in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The N&S initially connected Nakusp and Three Forks but soon extended to Sandon.

Eholt is in the Boundary Country region of south central British Columbia. This ghost town, on BC Highway 3, is by road about 27 kilometres (17 mi) northwest of Grand Forks and 14 kilometres (9 mi) northeast of Greenwood.

Slocan, British Columbia Village in British Columbia, Canada

The Village of Slocan is in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The former steamboat landing and ferry terminal is at the mouth of Springer Creek, at the foot of Slocan Lake. The locality, on BC Highway 6 is about 69 kilometres (43 mi) by road north of Castlegar and 183 kilometres (114 mi) by road and ferry south of Revelstoke.

Glacier, British Columbia

Glacier, which once comprised small communities, is on the western approach to Rogers Pass in southeastern British Columbia. The name derives from the Great Glacier, which in the 1880s was just over a mile from the original train station.

Robson is an unincorporated community in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The former steamboat landing and railway terminal is on the northeast side of the Columbia River. The residential area is off Broadwater Road, within the northwest part of Greater Castlegar.

Albert Canyon Railway point in British Columbia, Canada

Albert Canyon is about 32 kilometres (20 mi) east of Revelstoke in southeastern British Columbia. The former community no longer exists, but the Canyon Hot Springs Resort borders to its north, both immediately southwest of the Tangier River confluence with the Illecillewaet River.

The Big Bend is the northernmost section of the Columbia River, which changes from a northwestward course along the Rocky Mountain Trench to curve around the northern end of the Selkirk Mountains to head southwest between that range and the Monashee Mountains, which lie to the west. The area is part of the larger Columbia Country, which includes the Columbia Valley and upper Arrow Lakes of eastern British Columbia. The 2,300 square miles (6,000 km2) north of the railway line, and enclosed by the river, roughly defines the Big Bend. However, in earlier eras, the descriptive was more narrowly understood.

<i>Marion</i> (sternwheeler)

Marion was a small sternwheel steamboat that operated in several waterways in inland British Columbia from 1888 to 1901.

Lardeau Place in British Columbia, Canada

Lardeau is an unincorporated community, and former mining town and steamboat landing. The settlement is on the west shore near the head of Kootenay Lake in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia.

Trout Lake, British Columbia Place in British Columbia, Canada

Trout Lake is an unincorporated community in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The former steamboat landing is at the north end of Trout Lake. The locality, on BC Highway 31, is by road about 177 kilometres (110 mi) north of Nelson and 90 kilometres (56 mi) by road and ferry southeast of Revelstoke.

Galena Bay Place in British Columbia, Canada

Galena Bay is an unincorporated locality, on the bay of the same name, at the head of Upper Arrow Lake in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia.

Rosebery, British Columbia Place in British Columbia, Canada

Rosebery is an unincorporated community about 6 kilometres (4 mi) north of New Denver in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The former steamboat landing and ferry terminal is at the mouth of Wilson Creek on the eastern shore of Slocan Lake. The locality, on BC Highway 6, is about 106 kilometres (66 mi) by road north of Castlegar and 144 kilometres (89 mi) by road and ferry south of Revelstoke.

Thrums unincorporated community in British Columbia, Canada

Thrums is an unincorporated community on the northwest shore of the Kootenay River in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The location, on BC Highway 3A, is by road about 11 kilometres (7 mi) northeast of Castlegar, and 33 kilometres (21 mi) southwest of Nelson.

Poplar Creek, British Columbia Place in British Columbia, Canada

Poplar Creek is a settlement in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The locality, on Highway 31, is about 37 kilometres (23 mi) northwest of Lardeau and 16 kilometres (10 mi) southeast of Gerrard.

Three Forks, British Columbia Place in British Columbia, Canada

Three Forks is a ghost town at the junction of Carpenter, Seaton, and Kane creeks in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. This former mining community, on BC Highway 31A, is by road about 8 kilometres (5 mi) east of New Denver and 38 kilometres (24 mi) west of Kaslo.

Brooklyn is a ghost town by the mouth of Brooklyn Creek on the west shore of Lower Arrow Lake in the West Kootenay region of southern British Columbia. The former steamboat landing, accessible only by boat, was approximately 31 kilometres (19 mi) northwest of Castlegar.

Gerrard, British Columbia Place in British Columbia, Canada

Gerrard is a ghost town in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The settlement was at the south end of Trout Lake, east of Upper Arrow Lake.

Beavermouth (railway point), British Columbia Railway point in British Columbia, Canada

Beavermouth is about 43 kilometres (27 mi) west of Golden, and about 32 kilometres (20 mi) east of the mid-point of the Connaught Tunnel beneath Rogers Pass, in southeastern British Columbia. At the mouth of the Beaver River, the train station was called Beavermouth, but the adjacent community, which no longer exists, was known as Beaver or Beaver Mouth. Nowadays, the closest road access is to the nearby Kinbasket Lake Resort.

References