Trowbridge Archeological Site

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Trowbridge Archeological Site
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LocationBetween 61st and 63rd Sts., north of May Ln. and Leavenworth Rd., Kansas City, Kansas [1] :2
Coordinates 39°8′40″N94°43′20″W / 39.14444°N 94.72222°W / 39.14444; -94.72222 Coordinates: 39°8′40″N94°43′20″W / 39.14444°N 94.72222°W / 39.14444; -94.72222
Area3.5 acres (1.4 ha)
NRHP reference No. 71000337 [2]
Added to NRHPFebruary 24, 1971

The Trowbridge Archaeological Site is located in the vicinity of North 61st Street and Leavenworth Road in Kansas City, Kansas. Discovered in 1939 by amateur archaeologist Harry Trowbridge in the back yard of his property, it was inhabited c. AD 200–600 by the Kansas City Hopewell culture. [1] :1,2

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on February 24, 1971, and placed on the Register of Historic Kansas Places on July 1, 1977. [1] :1

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Trowbridge Archeological Site Archived 2011-06-09 at the Wayback Machine , Wyandotte County, n.d. Accessed 2009-12-23.
  2. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. March 13, 2009.