Truce of Mitawa

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The Truce of Mitawa or Truce of Mitau, signed in November 1622 in Jelgava (Mitawa, Mitau), ended the Polish–Swedish War (1620–1622).

Jelgava City in Latvia

Jelgava is a city in central Latvia about 41 kilometres southwest of Riga with 55,972 inhabitants (2019). It is the largest town in the region of Zemgale (Semigalia). Jelgava was the capital of the united Duchy of Courland and Semigallia (1578–1795) and the administrative center of the Courland Governorate (1795–1918).

The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth was forced to cede the Duchy of Livonia north of the Daugava River to the Kingdom of Sweden. It retained only a nominal control over the south-eastern territories near Riga, as well as the Duchy of Courland. The truce lasted till March 1625, when a new war wave of hostilities erupted in Lithuania. It was soon followed by the Polish–Swedish War (1625–1629).

Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth Former European state

The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth – formally, the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and, after 1791, the Commonwealth of Poland – was a dual state, a bi-confederation of Poland and Lithuania ruled by a common monarch, who was both King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania. It was one of the largest and most populous countries of 16th- to 17th-century Europe. At its largest territorial extent, in the early 17th century, the Commonwealth covered almost 400,000 square miles (1,000,000 km2) and sustained a multi-ethnic population of 11 million.

Riga City in Latvia

Riga is the capital and largest city of Latvia. Being home to 632,614 inhabitants (2019), which is a third of Latvia's population, it is large enough to be the country's primate city. It is also the largest city in the three Baltic states and is home to one tenth of the three Baltic states' combined population. The city lies on the Gulf of Riga at the mouth of the Daugava river where it meets the Baltic Sea. Riga's territory covers 307.17 km2 (118.60 sq mi) and lies 1–10 m above sea level, on a flat and sandy plain.

Lithuania Republic in Northeastern Europe

Lithuania, officially the Republic of Lithuania, is a country in the Baltic region of Europe. Lithuania is considered to be one of the Baltic states. It is situated along the southeastern shore of the Baltic Sea, to the east of Sweden and Denmark. It is bordered by Latvia to the north, Belarus to the east and south, Poland to the south, and Kaliningrad Oblast to the southwest. Lithuania has an estimated population of 2.8 million people as of 2019, and its capital and largest city is Vilnius. Other major cities are Kaunas and Klaipėda. Lithuanians are Baltic people. The official language, Lithuanian, is one of only two living languages in the Baltic branch of the Indo-European language family, the other being Latvian.

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Duchy of Courland and Semigallia former country

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The Polish–Swedish Wars were a series of wars between the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and Sweden. Broadly construed, the term refers to a series of wars between 1563 and 1721. More narrowly, it refers to particular wars between 1600 and 1629. These are the wars included under the broader use of the term:

Duchy of Livonia was territory of Grand Duchy of Lithuania and later of Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, 1561-1621

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