True Hills

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True Hills ( 80°12′S26°51′W / 80.200°S 26.850°W / -80.200; -26.850 Coordinates: 80°12′S26°51′W / 80.200°S 26.850°W / -80.200; -26.850 ) is a rock hills 1 nautical mile (1.9 km; 1.2 mi) southeast of Wiggans Hills, rising to 850 m and marking the northeast end of La Grange Nunataks, Shackleton Range. Photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and surveyed by British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1968–1971. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) after Anthony True, BAS surveyor, Halley Station, 1968–1970, who worked in Shackleton Range.

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Shackleton Range Mountain range in Antarctica

The Shackleton Range is a mountain range in Antarctica. Rising at Holmes Summit to 1,875 metres (6,152 ft), it extends in an east–west direction for about 160 kilometres (99 mi) between the Slessor and Recovery glaciers.

Zittel Cliffs is a set of cliffs rising to about 1,400 m in the northwest part of Du Toit Nunataks, Read Mountains, Shackleton Range. The feature was surveyed by the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1957, photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and further surveyed by British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1968–71. In association with the names of geologists grouped in this area, named by United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1971 after Karl Alfred von Zittel (1839-1904), German paleontologist who specialized in the study of fossil sponges.

Blaiklock Glacier is a glacier 16 nautical miles (30 km) long, flowing north from Turnpike Bluff, then northwest to Mount Provender and Mount Lowe in the western part of the Shackleton Range, Antarctica. It was first mapped in 1957 by the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition (CTAE), and named for Kenneth V. Blaiklock, the leader of the advance party of the CTAE in 1955–56 and a surveyor with the transpolar party in 1956–58.

Wyeth Heights is a rock heights rising to 1,335 m at the head of Blaiklock Glacier, forming the southeast extremity of Otter Highlands in western Shackleton Range. The feature was surveyed by the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition in 1957 and was photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy in 1967. It was further surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) from 1968 to 1971. It was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) after Robert B. Wyeth, a BAS geologist on Stonington Island from 1971 to 1973 who worked in the Shackleton Range in 1971.

Clarkson Cliffs are ice-covered cliffs marked by rock exposures, rising to 1,400 metres (4,600 ft) at the northeast edge of Fuchs Dome, Shackleton Range. They were photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1968–71. They were named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after Peter D. Clarkson, BAS geologist, Halley Research Station, 1968–70, who worked in the area for four seasons, 1968–71, 1977–78; Head, BAS Mineralogy, Geology and Geochemistry Section, 1976–89; at Scott Polar Research Institute from 1989.

The Clayton Ramparts are a line of east–west cliffs rising to over 1,600 metres (5,200 ft) at the southern margin of Fuchs Dome, Shackleton Range. They were surveyed by the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1957, photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and further surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1968–71. They were named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after Charles A. Clayton, BAS surveyor, Halley Research Station, 1969–71, who worked in the area.

Watts Needle is a needle-shaped peak (1,450 m) at the southwest end of the ridge east of Glen Glacier, in the Read Mountains, Shackleton Range. It was photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy in 1967 and was surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) from 1968 to 1971. In association with the names of geologists grouped in this area, it was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1971 after William Whitehead Watts (1860–1947), a British geologist who worked particularly on the Precambrian rocks of the English midlands. Watts was also a professor of geology at the Imperial College in London from 1906 to 1930.

Mount Wegener is a mountain rising to 1,385 m in central Read Mountains, Shackleton Range. The feature was photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy in 1967 and was surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) from 1968 to 1971. It was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in association with the names of geologists grouped in this area after Alfred L. Wegener (1880–1930), a German astronomer, meteorologist, Arctic explorer, and a pioneer of the theory of continental drift. Wegener was a professor of geophysics and meteorology at the University of Graz in Austria between 1924–30 and was the leader of German expeditions to Greenland in 1929 and 1930 before losing his life on the ice cap in November of that year.

Wiggans Hills are a range of exposed rock hills in Antarctica, 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) long, rising to about 700 m on the west side of the terminus of Gordon Glacier and forming the northernmost feature of La Grange Nunataks, Shackleton Range. Photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and surveyed by British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1968–71. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1971 for Thomas H. Wiggans, BAS general assistant at Halley Station, 1968–70, who worked in the area during two seasons.

Swinnerton Ledge is a flat-topped ridge rising to about 1,500 m and marking the east end of the Read Mountains, Shackleton Range. Photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967. Surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1968–71. In association with the names of geologists grouped in this area, named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) after Henry H. Swinnerton (1876–1966), British zoologist and paleontologist, Professor of Geology, University College, Nottingham, 1912–46; President, Geological Society, 1938–40.

Jamieson Ridge is a narrow ridge 1 nautical mile (2 km) long, rising to about 1,200 metres (4,000 ft) at the southwestern end of the Herbert Mountains, in the Shackleton Range, Antarctica. It was photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey, 1968–71. In association with the names of glacial geologists grouped in this area, it was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1971 after Thomas F. Jamieson, a Scottish geologist whose work on the ice-worn rocks of Scotland developed the true origin of glacial striae in 1862, and who in 1865 originated the theory of isostasy.

Sumgin Buttress is a prominent elevated rock mass 2.5 nautical miles (4.6 km) southwest of Charpentier Pyramid, rising to about 1,100 m on the west side of Herbert Mountains, Shackleton Range. It was roughly surveyed by the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1957 and was photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy in 1967. It was resurveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) between 1968 and 1971. In association with the names of glacial geologists grouped in this area, it was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1971 after Mikhail I. Sumgin (1873–1942), a Russian pioneer in permafrost research.

Guyatt Ridge is a ridge southwest of Wedge Ridge in the southern part of the Haskard Highlands, in the Shackleton Range, Antarctica. It was surveyed by the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1957, photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and further surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1968–71. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after Malcolm J. Guyatt, a BAS general assistant at Halley Station, 1969–71, who worked in the Shackleton Range, 1969–70.

Mount Etchells is one of the La Grange Nunataks in the Shackleton Range of Antarctica, rising to about 900 metres (3,000 ft) to the west of Mount Beney. It was photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy in 1967 and surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) between 1968–71. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after William A. Etchells, a diesel mechanic and Projects Officer (engineering) with the BAS from 1962–88, who worked in the Shackleton Range between 1968–69.

The Genghis Hills are hills rising to 1,305 metres (4,280 ft) to the south of Fuchs Dome and 4 nautical miles (7 km) west of Stephenson Bastion, in the Shackleton Range, Antarctica. They were photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1968–71. They were named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1971 after Graham K. ("Genghis") Wright, a BAS general assistant at Halley Station, 1968–71, who took part in the survey, 1969–70.

Mathys Bank is a rock ridge rising to about 750 metres (2,500 ft), located 2.5 nautical miles (5 km) southwest of Mount Etchells in the La Grange Nunataks, Shackleton Range, Antarctica. It was photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1968–71. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after Nicholas Mathys, BAS general assistant at Halley Station, 1967–69, who worked in the Shackleton Range in summer 1968–69.

Schimper Glacier is a glacier in the east part of Herbert Mountains, Shackleton Range, flowing north-northeast into Slessor Glacier. Photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and surveyed by British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1968–71. In association with the names of glacial geologists grouped in the area, named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) after Karl Friedrich Schimper (1803–67), German botanist who in 1835 originated the theory of the Ice Age in Europe to account for the distribution of erratic boulders.

Mount Skidmore is a mountain on the east side of the mouth of Stratton Glacier in the Shackleton Range. It was first mapped in 1957 by the CTAE, and it was photographed in 1967 by U.S. Navy trimetrogon aerial photography. It was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) for Michael J. Skidmore, a British Antarctic Survey (BAS) geologist at the Brunt Ice Shelf between 1966–69 who worked in the Shackleton Range from 1968–69.

Spath Crest is a summit rocks rising to about 1,450 m and marking the northwest end of Du Toit Nunataks, Read Mountains, in the Shackleton Range. It was photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy in 1967 and surveyed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) between 1968 and 1971. In association with the names of geologists grouped in the area, it was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) after Leonard Frank Spath (1882–1957), a British paleontologist and stratigrapher whose study of ammonites made possible the correlation of Mesozoic rocks. Spath was also a paleontologist for the British Museum of Natural History from 1912 to 1957.

Ramsay Wedge is a narrow rock spur, 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) long, with talus slopes rising to about 1,200 m, located 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) southwest of Mount Absalom in the southwest portion of the Herbert Mountains, Shackleton Range. Photographed from the air by the U.S. Navy, 1967, and surveyed by British Antarctic Survey (BAS), 1968–71. In association with the names of glacial geologists grouped in this area, named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) after Sir Andrew C. Ramsay (1814–91), Scottish geologist who first recognized the glacial origin of rock basins in 1862; Director-General, Geological Survey of Great Britain, 1871–81.