Trumpet Concerto (Hummel)

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Johann Nepomuk Hummel wrote his Concerto a Trombe Principale (Trumpet Concerto in E Major) for Viennese trumpet virtuoso and inventor of the keyed trumpet, Anton Weidinger (as had Joseph Haydn). It was written in December 1803 and performed on New Year's Day 1804 to mark Hummel's entrance into the court orchestra of Nikolaus II, Prince Esterházy as Haydn's successor. There are places, primarily in the second movement, where Weidinger is believed to have changed the music because of the execution of the instrument. It is unknown whether this was in agreement with Hummel.

Contents

Originally this piece was written in E major. [1] The piece is often performed in E-flat major, which makes the fingering less difficult on modern E-flat and B-flat trumpets.

Duration is 17 minutes approximately.

Form

The work is composed in three movements (typical of a concerto) and they are marked as follows:

Instrumentation

The work is scored for trumpet solo, flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 horns, timpani and strings.

See also

Notes

  1. Koehler, Elisa (January 2003). "In Search of Hummel: Perspectives on the Trumpet Concerto of 1803" (PDF). International Trumpet Guild Journal. Retrieved 4 May 2013.


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