Trunk Line Bridge No. 1

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Trunk Line Bridge No. 1
US 41 Peshekee Bridge.jpg
Abandoned Peshekee River Bridge in Michigamme Township
USA Michigan location map.svg
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Usa edcp location map.svg
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LocationOld US 41/M-28 over Peshekee River, Michigamme Township, Michigan
Coordinates 46°31′42″N88°0′13″W / 46.52833°N 88.00361°W / 46.52833; -88.00361 Coordinates: 46°31′42″N88°0′13″W / 46.52833°N 88.00361°W / 46.52833; -88.00361
Built1914 (1914)
ArchitectPowell and Mitchell; Michigan State Highway Department
Architectural styleOther
MPS Highway Bridges of Michigan MPS
NRHP reference # 99001530
Added to NRHPDecember 17, 1999 [1]

Trunk Line Bridge No. 1, [lower-alpha 1] also known as Peshekee River Bridge, is a bridge adjacent to US Highway 41/M-28 (US 41/M-28). It was the first of many trunkline bridges designed by the Michigan State Highway Department. [2] [3] It was built in 1914, and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1999. [1]

US Highway 41 (US 41) is a part of the United States Numbered Highway System that runs from Miami, Florida, to the Upper Peninsula of the US state of Michigan. In Michigan, it is a state trunkline highway that enters the state via the Interstate Bridge between Marinette, Wisconsin, and Menominee, Michigan. The 278.769 miles (448.635 km) of US 41 that lie within Michigan serve as a major conduit. Most of the highway is listed on the National Highway System. Various sections are rural two-lane highway, urbanized four-lane divided expressway and the Copper Country Trail National Scenic Byway. The northernmost community along the highway is Copper Harbor at the tip of the Keweenaw Peninsula. The trunkline ends at a cul-de-sac east of Fort Wilkins State Park after serving the Central Upper Peninsula and Copper Country regions of Michigan.

M-28 is an east–west state trunkline highway that traverses nearly all of the Upper Peninsula of the U.S. state of Michigan, from Wakefield to near Sault Ste. Marie in Bruce Township. Along with US Highway 2 (US 2), M-28 forms a pair of primary highways linking the Upper Peninsula from end to end, providing a major access route for traffic from Michigan and Canada along the southern shore of Lake Superior. M-28 is the longest state trunkline in Michigan numbered with the "M-" prefix at 290.373 miles (467.310 km). The entire highway is listed on the National Highway System, while three sections of M-28 are part of the Lake Superior Circle Tour. M-28 also carries two memorial highway designations along its route.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

Contents

Description

Trunk Line Bridge No. 1 is a multiple-span concrete bridge which is located five miles (8.0 km) east of Michigamme. The bridge used to carry US 41/M-28 across the Pesheskee River near the river's mouth at Lake Michigamme. It is located between a Soo Line Railroad (ex-Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railway) bridge to the south and the modern replacement bridge to the north. [2]

Michigamme, Michigan Census-designated place & Unincorporated community in Michigan, United States

Michigamme is an unincorporated community in Marquette County of the U.S. state of Michigan. It is a census-designated place (CDP) for statistical purposes and without any legal status as a municipality. As of the 2000 census, the CDP population was 287.

Lake Michigamme lake in Marquette and Baraga counties, Michigan, United States

Lake Michigamme, one of Michigan's largest lakes, reaches a depth of over 70 feet (21 m). It covers 4,292 acres (17.37 km2) in Marquette and Baraga County, Michigan. Van Riper State Park provides public access. The vast majority of the lake lies in Marquette County, with only its westernmost part extending into Baraga County.

Soo Line Railroad American Class I Railroad

The Soo Line Railroad is the primary United States railroad subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific Railway, one of seven U.S. Class I railroads, controlled through the Soo Line Corporation. Although it is named for the Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie Railroad (MStP&SSM), which was commonly known as the Soo Line after the phonetic spelling of Sault, it was formed in 1961 by the consolidation of that company with two other CP subsidiaries, the Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railroad and Wisconsin Central Railroad. It is also the successor to other Class I railroads, including the Minneapolis, Northfield and Southern Railway and Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad. On the other hand, a large amount of mileage was spun off in 1987 to Wisconsin Central Ltd., now part of the Canadian National Railway. The Soo Line and the Delaware and Hudson Railway, the CP's other major subsidiary, presently do business as the Canadian Pacific Railway, and most equipment has been repainted into the CP's scheme, but the U.S. Surface Transportation Board groups all CP's U.S. subsidiaries under the Soo Line name for reporting purposes. The Minneapolis headquarters are located in the Canadian Pacific Plaza building, having moved from the nearby Soo Line Building.

The bridge is 240 feet (73 m) in length, composed of six 40-foot (12 m) concrete through girders. This carries a concrete deck and full-height abutments over solid concrete piers with bullnosed cutwaters. In total, it used some 600 cubic yards (459 m3) of concrete in the design. The girder walls feature rectangular recessed panels capped by concrete copings. [2]

History

Today, drivers cannot use the Peshekee River Bridge south of US 41/M-28 in western Marquette County's Michigamme Township, although access can be had on foot from the eastern side. The bridge is under the supervision of the Michigan State Parks with the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and is part of the Van Riper State Park. The bridge was built in 1914 in response to the 1913 State Trunk Line Act passed by the Michigan Legislature. This act created the State Trunkline Highway System comprising nearly 3,000 miles (4,828 km). The act further said that the Michigan State Highway Department would design, build and maintain trunkline bridges spanning 30 feet (9 m) or more so long as the local governments improved an adjacent three miles (4.8 km) of roads. Marquette County built a mainline road from Marquette west to Michigamme near the county line, including an improved three-mile (4.8 km) section in 1913 to encourage the state to build the bridge. The bridge was designed by C.V. Dewart for the department and built by the local firm of Powell and Mitchell in Marquette. The Peshekee River Bridge would later be incorporated into the routing of US 41 in the 1920s. [2]

Marquette County, Michigan County in the United States

Marquette County is a county located in the Upper Peninsula of the US state of Michigan. As of the 2010 census, the population was 67,077. The county seat is Marquette. The county is named for Father Marquette, a Jesuit missionary. It was set off in 1843 and organized in 1851. Marquette County is the largest county in land area in Michigan, and the most populous county in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Michigamme Township, Michigan Civil township in Michigan, United States

Michigamme Township is a civil township of Marquette County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 377 at the 2000 census. The unincorporated community of Michigamme is located within the township.

Michigan Legislature

The Michigan Legislature is the legislature of the U.S. state of Michigan. It is organized as a bicameral body composed of an upper chamber, the Senate, and a lower chamber, the House of Representatives. Article IV of the Michigan Constitution, adopted in 1963, defines the role of the Legislature and how it is to be constituted. The primary purpose of the Legislature is to enact new laws and amend or repeal existing laws. The Legislature meets in the Capitol building in Lansing.

The bridge was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1999 as "Trunk Line Bridge No. 1" for its engineering and architectural significance. [1] MDOT has listed it as "one of Michigan's most important vehicular bridges." [2] It was the first bridge designed by the Michigan State Highway Department, the forerunner to MDOT, in 1914. The original bridge was abandoned as a roadway when a second crossing was built. The second crossing was bypassed and demolished during the construction of the current highway bridge over the Peshekee River on US 41/M-28 in late 1995. [4]

See also

Notes

  1. The bridge is incorrectly listed as "Truck Line Bridge No. 1" in the National Register Information System (NRIS) database, hence it is also incorrectly listed in various websites echoing the public domain NRIS data. Its correct name, using "Trunk" not "Truck", is clear from the Michigan Department of Transportation webpage on the bridge and also in the context given in the National Register's own Highway Bridges of Michigan MPS, another reference here.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 National Park Service (April 15, 2008). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. Retrieved January 18, 2008.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Michigan Department of Transportation (April 23, 2002). "US 41 (Abandoned)–Peshekee River Bridge". Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 18, 2008.
  3. Roise, Charlene K.; Fraser, Clayton B. (1999). "National Register of Historic Places Multiple Property Submission: Highway Highway Bridges of Michigan, 1875–1948" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved January 18, 2008.
  4. A. Lindberg & Sons. "Projects". A. Lindberg & Sons. Archived from the original on February 6, 2010. Retrieved February 13, 2008.