Truthall Halt railway station

Last updated

Truthall Halt
Station on heritage railway
SDJR Peckett 0-4-0ST Kilmersdon - Truthall Halt.jpg
The restored station taken from the road bridge to the South in May 2018.
LocationEngland
Coordinates 50°07′15″N5°17′01″W / 50.1209°N 5.2837°W / 50.1209; -5.2837 Coordinates: 50°07′15″N5°17′01″W / 50.1209°N 5.2837°W / 50.1209; -5.2837
Platforms1
Key dates
3 July 1905Opened
July 1906Renamed Truthall Platform
5 November 1962Closed
16 March 2017Reopened [1]

A latecomer to the passenger facilities on the Helston branch, Truthall Halt was opened on 3 July 1905, at a location about one and three-quarters miles (2.8 km) north of Helston. [2] It was located just above the 300 feet (91 m) contour and served the villages of Trannack and Gwavas, and also Truthall Manor. Truthall Halt was the first stop on the line from Helston and was a short platform with an iconic "Pagoda" style shelter.

Contents

Description

Thuthall Halt was constructed adjacent to a road overbridge and had pedestrian access down a short flight of shallow steps from the road; there was no vehicular access. It had a single platform 84 feet long on the down side of the line, though it was shortened later to about 50 feet. [3] The platform had stone edging and a cinder surface and infill held back by wooden slats retained by wooden posts. [4]

History

Truthall Halt opened as such but changed its name to Truthall Platform in July 1906 and closed with this name on 5 November 1962. [5] The station has held three different names – Truthall Platform, Truthall Halt and Truthall Bridge Halt – although the last one was only referred to in ticketing. [6]

In 2016–17 the platform was rebuilt and re-opened in March 2017. [7] On 9 February 2019, Truthall Halt and the Helston Railway won the Heritage Railway Association Annual Award for Small Groups for the work in restoring Truthall. [8]

Restoration

Truthall Halt in 2017 Truthall halt.jpg
Truthall Halt in 2017

The platform has been rebuilt by the Helston Railway as their third station along the line. The halt has been restored in its original two coach length with as many original features as possible [9] including a replica of the GWR Pagoda shelter has been built new from photos and original drawings of the shelter. [1] The restored station won the Cornish Buildings Group award in 2019 for its "considerable research and constructional ingenuity". [10]

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References

  1. 1 2 Jones, Robin, ed. (February 2018). "Cornwall's Truthall Halt reappears from the past". Heritage Railway. No. 238. Horncastle: Mortons Media. p. 10. ISSN   1466-3562.
  2. "Helston Branch - Cornwall Railway Society". Cornwallrailwaysociety.org.uk. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 7 March 2017.
  3. Cornwall Railway Stations, Mike Oakley, 2009, Dovecote Press, Wimborne Minster, ISBN   978-1-904-34968-6
  4. Heginbotham, Stephen (2010). Cornwall's Railways Remembered. Halsgrove. pp. 91–92. ISBN   978-0-85704-005-3.
  5. "Cornwall railway society webpage". Cornwallrailwaysociety.org.uk. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 16 February 2017.
  6. "Photo of a ticket from Truthall Bridge Halt to Helston". Cornwall Railway Society. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 1 September 2017.
  7. "Helston Railway website photos November 2016". Helston Railway. Archived from the original on 17 February 2017. Retrieved 16 February 2017.
  8. "2019 Awards - Winners and Shortlists". Heritage Railway Association. Archived from the original on 10 February 2019.
  9. "Helston Railway Info page". Helstonrailway.org. Archived from the original on 17 February 2017. Retrieved 17 February 2017.
  10. "Awards 2019". Cornish Buildings Group. Archived from the original on 16 October 2020. Retrieved 8 January 2021.
Preceding station Historical railways Following station
Nancegollan   Great Western Railway
Helston Railway
  Helston