Tryne Fjord

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Tryne Fjord
Location of Tryne Fjord
Antarctica

Tryne Fjord is an irregular-shaped fjord that idents the northern side of Langnes Peninsula in the Vestfold Hills. Mapped and named Tryne Fjord (snout fjord) by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936–37. Barrier Island lies at the entrance to the fjord. [1]

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The Vestfold Hills are rounded, rocky, coastal hills, 411 square kilometres (159 sq mi) in extent, on the north side of Sorsdal Glacier on the Ingrid Christensen Coast of Princess Elizabeth Land, Antarctica. The hills are subdivided by three west-trending peninsulas bounded by narrow fjords. Most of the hills range between 30 and 90 metres in height, with the highest summit reaching nearly 160 metres (520 ft).

Billefjorden

Billefjorden is the central fjord of the three branching from the innermost part of the Isfjorden to the northeast, in Svalbard, Norway. It is 30 km long and 5–8 km wide. Billefjorden lies between Dickson Land to the northwest and Bünsow Land in the southeast. Located on its northwestern shore is the former Russian mining community of Pyramiden. To the northeast is Nordenskiöldbreen.

Walkabout Rocks is a prominent rock exposure along the coast at the north-eastern extremity of the Vestfold Hills, about 0.5 nautical miles south of the Wyatt Earp Islands of Princess Elizabeth Land, Antarctica. It was mapped from aerial photographs taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936–37.

Tryne Islands Islands of Antarctica

The Tryne Islands are a group of numerous small Antarctic islands and rocks, about 7 km (4 mi) in extent, forming the western limit of Tryne Bay and Tryne Sound at the north-eastern end of the Vestfold Hills. The islands were mapped by Norwegian cartographers from aerial photographs taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition (1936–37) and named Trynøyane.

Wright Peninsula

Wright Peninsula is a peninsula on the east coast of Adelaide Island, Antarctica, lying between Stonehouse Bay to the north and Ryder Bay to the south. On its northern coastline the peninsula is fringed by the Stokes Peaks; on its southern side by the Reptile Ridge. The Princess Royal Range separates the peninsula from the rest of Adelaide Island; the only 'gap' is provided by McCallum Pass.

Armadillo Hill

Armadillo Hill is an ice-covered hill in Antarctica which rises to 1,760 metres (5,770 ft) and projects 120 metres (400 ft) above the surrounding ice sheet. It is situated in the south part of Hemimont Plateau in Graham Land 4 nautical miles (7 km) east-southeast of the head of Northeast Glacier and 8 nautical miles (15 km) northeast of the head of Neny Fjord. First roughly surveyed by the British Graham Land Expedition, 1934–37, it was resurveyed in 1940 by sledging parties of the United States Antarctic Service on whose field charts the hill is labelled "Sawtooth". It was named Armadillo Hill by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey following its 1946–47 survey, because when viewed from the northeast the tumbled ice blocks on the summit and general shape of the hill resemble the side view of an armadillo.

The Blackwall Mountains in Antarctica rise to 1,370 metres (4,500 ft), extending in a west-northwest–east-southeast direction for 5 nautical miles (9 km) and lying close south of Neny Fjord on the west coast of Graham Land. They are bounded to the east by Remus Glacier, to the south by Romulus Glacier, and are separated from Red Rock Ridge to the west by Safety Col. First roughly surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill, they were re-surveyed in 1948–49 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, and so named by them because the black cliffs of the mountains facing Rymill Bay remain snow free throughout the year.

Breidnes Peninsula is a rocky peninsula, 13 nautical miles (24 km) long and 5 nautical miles (9 km) wide, between Ellis Fjord and Langnes Fjord in the Vestfold Hills. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition (1936–37) and named "Breidneset".

Krok Fjord is a narrow sinuous fjord, 11 nautical miles (20 km) long, between Mule Peninsula and Sorsdal Glacier Tongue, at the south end of the Vestfold Hills, Antarctica. It was mapped from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition (1936–37) and named "Krokfjorden".

Tryne Bay is a bay about 3 nautical miles (6 km) wide at the northeast end of the Vestfold Hills, lying between the Tryne Islands and the coast. Charted by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition (1936–37) and named "Trynevika".

Tryne Crossing is a low but rough pass across Langnes Peninsula, Vestfold Hills, leading from the southwest arm of Tryne Fjord to Langnes Fjord. Used for portage and sledges and probably suitable for tracked vehicles. The area was mapped from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition (1936–37), and was photographed by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump (1946–47). First traversed by an ANARE party led by B.H. Stinear, May 13, 1957, and named for its association with Tryne Fjord.

Tryne Sound is a short, narrow passage on the north side of Langnes Peninsula, Vestfold Hills, connecting Tryne Bay and Tryne Fjord. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition (1936–37) and named Tryne Sund.

Ellis Fjord is a long narrow fjord between Breidnes Peninsula and Mule Peninsula in the Vestfold Hills of Antarctica. It was photographed by the Lars Christensen Expedition (1936–37), and plotted by Norwegian cartographers as a bay and a remnant lake which were called "Mulvik" and "Langevatnet" respectively. Analysis by John Roscoe of air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump (1946–47) showed these two features to be connected. The feature was renamed Ellis Fjord by Roscoe after Edwin E. Ellis, aerial photographer on U.S. Navy Operation Highjump flights over this area.

Gibbs Glacier is a glacier, 15 nautical miles (28 km) long, flowing southeast into the northern part of Mercator Ice Piedmont on the east side of the Antarctic Peninsula. This feature together with Neny Glacier, which flows northwest, occupy a transverse depression between Mercator Ice Piedmont and Neny Fjord on the west side of the Antarctic Peninsula. Gibbs Glacier was photographed from the air and first mapped by the United States Antarctic Service, 1939–41, and the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition, 1947–48. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Peter M. Gibbs of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, a surveyor at Horseshoe Island, 1957, and leader at Stonington Island, 1958, who was responsible for the first ground survey of the glacier.

Sørsdal Glacier

Sørsdal Glacier is a heavily crevassed glacier on the Ingrid Christensen Coast of Princess Elizabeth Land in Antarctica, 15 nautical miles (28 km) long, flowing westward along the south side of Krok Fjord and the Vestfold Hills and terminating in a prominent glacier tongue at Prydz Bay. Discovered in February 1935 by a Norwegian expedition under Captain Klarius Mikkelsen and named for Lief Sørsdal, a Norwegian dentist and a member of the party from the whaling ship Thorshavn that landed at the northern end of the Vestfold Hills.

Sorenson Glacier is a glacier between Moore Dome and Rogers Spur on Bear Peninsula, flowing west into Dotson Ice Shelf on Walgreen Coast, Marie Byrd Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy aerial photographs, 1959–67. Named in 1977 by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Jon E. Sorenson, civil engineer, USGS, a member of the satellite surveying team at South Pole Station, winter party 1975.

Langnes Fjord is a narrow fjord, 10 nautical miles (19 km) long, between Langnes Peninsula and Breidnes Peninsula in the Vestfold Hills of Antarctica. It was mapped from air photos by the Lars Christensen Expedition (1936–37) and named after Langnes Peninsula. John Roscoe's 1952 study of air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump (1946–47) revealed that this fjord continues farther east than was previously mapped, and that it includes what had been plotted as an isolated lake which the Norwegians had called "Breidvatnet."

Langnes Peninsula is a narrow rocky peninsula in Antarctica. Of irregular shape, and 9 nautical miles (17 km) long, it is the northernmost of the three main peninsulas that comprise the Vestfold Hills. The name derives from "Langneset", applied by the Lars Christensen Expedition (1936–37) which mapped the peninsula from aerial photographs.

Barrier Island is an island, 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km) long, at the north end of the Vestfold Hills, lying just north of the entrance to Tryne Fjord in Tryne Sound. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936–37. Visited in 1957 by an ANARE party and so named because the island appeared to form a barrier to the passage of icebergs up Tryne Fjord.

References

  1. https://geonames.usgs.gov/apex/f?p=gnispq:5:::NO::P5_ANTAR_ID:1018.Missing or empty |title= (help)

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document: "Tryne Fjord".(content from the Geographic Names Information System )  OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg

Coordinates: 68°28′S78°22′E / 68.467°S 78.367°E / -68.467; 78.367