Trypauchenopsis intermedia

Last updated

Trypauchenopsis intermedia
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Gobiiformes
Family: Oxudercidae
Subfamily: Amblyopinae
Genus: Trypauchenopsis
Species:
T. intermedia
Binomial name
Trypauchenopsis intermedia
Volz, 1903
Synonyms
  • Brachyamblyopus intermedius(Volz, 1903)

Trypauchenopsis intermedia, the bearded eel goby, is a species of goby native to fresh waters from the Atlantic coast of South Africa to the Pacific island of Guam. This species grows to a length of 9.5 centimetres (3.7 in) TL. This species is the only known member of its genus. [2]

Related Research Articles

Acentrogobius therezieni is a species of goby endemic to hard, fresh waters of Madagascar. This species can reach a length of 10 centimetres (3.9 in) TL.

Croilia mossambica, the burrowing goby or naked goby, is a species of goby native fresh, brackish and marine waters of Mozambique, South Africa and Madagascar. This species can be found on fine-grained sandy substrates in still waters at depths of from 1 to 16 metres. It can reach a length of 6 centimetres (2.4 in) TL. It is currently the only known member of its genus.

<i>Favonigobius reichei</i> Species of fish

Favonigobius reichei, the Indopacific Tropical Sand Goby, is a species of goby native to fresh, brackish and marine waters of coastal areas of the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific Ocean preferring muddy or sandy substrates, often with weed growth. This species can reach a length of 8.3 centimetres (3.3 in) TL.

Chinestripe goby Species of fish

Stenogobius polyzona, the Chinestripe goby, is a species of goby native to streams and rivers on Madagascar and Réunion. Males of this species can reach a length of 15 centimetres (5.9 in) SL while females can reach 6.6 centimetres (2.6 in) SL.

Tank goby Species of fish

Glossogobius giuris, the tank goby, is a species of goby native to fresh, marine and brackish waters from the Red Sea and East Africa through South Asia and the Indian Ocean to China, Australia and the islands of the Pacific Ocean. This species can also be found in the aquarium trade. It is also known as the bar-eyed goby, flat-headed goby and the Gangetic tank goby.

<i>Valenciennea wardii</i> Species of fish

Valenciennea wardii, Ward's sleeper,Ward's sleeper goby, is a species of goby native to the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific Ocean in bays, reefs and lagoons at depths of from 12 to 35 metres. It can be found on sandy or silty substrates. This species can reach a length of 15 centimetres (5.9 in) SL. It can also be found in the aquarium trade. The specific name honours the United Kingdom diplomat Swinburne Ward (1830-1897) who was Her Majesty's Civil Commissioner for the Seychelles, although this species was described from specimens collected off Zanzibar.

<i>Koumansetta rainfordi</i> Species of fish

Koumansetta rainfordi, the old glory or Court Jester goby, is a species of goby native to tropical reefs of the western Pacific Ocean where it occurs at depths of from 2 to 30 metres. This species can reach a length of 8.5 centimetres (3.3 in) SL. It can also be found in the aquarium trade. The specific name honours the viticulturalist E. H. Rainford, of the Queensland Agricultural Department, who also collected specimens for the Australian Museum, and in 1924 he collected specimens of this species.

Hectors goby Species of fish

Hector's goby is a species of goby native to the Indian Ocean to the islands of Micronesia in the western Pacific Ocean. It can be found on sheltered coral reefs at depths of from 3 to 30 metres. This species reaches a length of 8.5 centimetres (3.3 in) SL. It can also be found in the aquarium trade. The specific name honours Gordon Hector who was Chief Secretary to the Government of the Seychelles, in gratitude for his help to Smith's work in the Seychelles.

Gorgeous prawn goby Species of fish

Amblyeleotris wheeleri, the Gorgeous prawn-goby, is a species of goby native to tropical reefs of the Indian Ocean to the western Pacific Ocean. It can be found at depths of from 5 to 40 metres though is usually does not occur deeper than 15 metres (49 ft). It is a commensal with alpheid shrimps, most often being found in association with Alpheus ochrostriatus. This species can reach a length of 10 centimetres (3.9 in) SL. It can also be found in the aquarium trade. The specific name honours the English ichthyologist Alwynne Cooper Wheeler (1929-2005), who was curator of Fishes at the British Museum, "for his help over the years, particularly with the authors’ study of prawn-associated gobies of the Seychelles".

Candycane pygmy goby Species of fish

Trimma cana, the Candy cane pygmy-goby, is a species of goby native to the western Pacific Ocean where it can be found from the Philippines to Palau. It inhabits steep slopes on the outer side of reefs, preferring a hard coral substrate, at depths of from 12 to 35 metres. This species can reach a length of 2.5 centimetres (0.98 in) SL.

<i>Oxyurichthys microlepis</i> Species of fish

Oxyurichthys microlepis, the maned goby, is a species of goby native to tropical marine and brackish waters along the coasts of the Indian Ocean from Africa to the western Pacific Ocean where it occurs in estuaries and inshore waters to depths of about 75 metres (246 ft). It occurs in the Mekong Delta and is suspected to use the tidal flow up the river to reach as far inland as Cambodia. This species can reach a length of 13.5 centimetres (5.3 in) TL. It is of minor importance to local commercial fisheries and can also be found in the aquarium trade.

Golden goby Species of fish

The golden goby is a species of goby from the family Gobiidae endemic to the Mediterranean Sea. It prefers areas with rocky substrates at depths of from 5 to 80 metres with plentiful growth of algae and gorgonians. This species can reach a length of 10 centimetres (3.9 in) TL. It can also be found in the aquarium trade. Gobius xanthocephalus is the name that is applied to the populations of similar gobies in the eastern Atlantic and western Mediterraean which were previously considered to be G. auratus.

Bucchichs goby Species of fish

Bucchich's goby is a species of goby native to the Eastern Mediterranean Sea and perhaps the Black Sea. It has traditionally been considered to be more widespread, but in 2016 the similar incognito goby was described. It had been confused with the Bucchich's goby and much information formerly published for this species is now considered to actually be for the incognito goby.

Amblyopinae Subfamily of fishes

Amblyopinae is a subfamily of elongated mud-dwelling gobies commonly called eel gobies or worm gobies; it has been regarded as a subfamily of the family Gobiidae, while the 5th edition Fishes of the World classifies it as a subfamily of the family Oxudercidae. The members in the subfamily have two dorsal fins that are connected by a membranous structure and their eyes are highly reduced in size. They are usually pink, red, or purple in coloration.

<i>Vanderhorstia ambanoro</i> Species of fish

Vanderhorstia ambanoro, the Ambanoro prawn-goby or twin-spotted shrimp-goby, is a species of fish native to the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific Ocean, where it occurs in lagoons and coastal bays at depths of from 1 to 30 metres. This species inhabits areas with mud or sand substrates, where it lives in association with Alpheus shrimps. This species can reach a length of 13 centimetres (5.1 in) TL. It can also be found in the aquarium trade.

<i>Bryaninops yongei</i> Species of fish

Bryaninops yongei, the wire-coral goby or whip coral goby, is a benthic species of goby widely distributed from the tropical and subtropical waters of the Indian Ocean to the islands in the center of the Pacific Ocean.

Isthmus goby Species of fish

The Isthmus goby is a species of goby native to marine and brackish waters of the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific Ocean where it can be found at depths of from 3 to 15 metres. This species lives on substrates consisting of a mix of sand and rubble. This species grows to a length of 10.2 centimetres (4.0 in) SL. This species is the only known member of its genus.

Small-eyed goby Species of fish

The small-eyed goby is a species of goby native to tropical reefs of the Indian Ocean through the western Pacific Ocean where it inhabits areas of coral rubble. As its common name suggests, this species has particularly small eyes. This species grows to a length of 6 centimetres (2.4 in) TL. This species is the only known member of its genus. The small-eyed goby is specialised to feed on seagrass and they share a burrows with mud lobsters of the genus Thalassina. The specific name honours Charles Melbourne Ward (1903-1966), the Australian actor, naturalist and collector of specimens who collected the type specimen.

Wolfsnout goby Species of fish

The wolfsnout goby, also known as the dognsout goby or cup-sponge goby, is a species of goby native to the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific Ocean. This species lives on large fan-shaped or floppy sponges, particularly Phyllospongia foliascens and Phyllospongia papyracea, growing on reefs at depths down to 15 metres (49 ft). This species grows to a length of 3.5 centimetres (1.4 in) SL. This species is the only known member of its genus. It spans benthically and is a solitary species.

The comb goby is a species of goby native to marine and brackish waters of the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific Ocean. This species occurs mostly on muddy substrates near mangrove forests. This species grows to a length of 18 centimetres (7.1 in) TL. This species is of minor importance to local commercial fisheries and can also be found in the aquarium trade. This species is the only known member of its genus. Paratrypauchen microcephalus has been recorded from areas which have soft, muddy bottoms, in estuaries and around the mouths of rivers near mangroves where they inhabit deep burrows in the mud. It is not known if they excavate the burrows themselves. This species feeds on benthic invertebrates such as crustaceans.

References

  1. Larson, H. (2016). "Trypauchenopsis intermedia". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 2016: e.T97780614A97780644. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-3.RLTS.T97780614A97780644.en.
  2. Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2013). "Trypauchenopsis intermedia" in FishBase . June 2013 version.