Trzypole

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Trzypole
Settlement
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Trzypole
Coordinates: Coordinates: 52°57′48″N14°14′14″E / 52.9632°N 14.2371°E / 52.9632; 14.2371
Country Flag of Poland.svg Poland
Voivodeship West Pomeranian
County Gryfino
Gmina Cedynia

Trzypole [tʂɨˈpɔlɛ] (German : Försterei Dreipfuhl) is a settlement in the administrative district of Gmina Cedynia, within Gryfino County, West Pomeranian Voivodeship, in north-western Poland, close to the German border. [1]

For the history of the region, see History of Pomerania.

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References

  1. "Central Statistical Office (GUS) - TERYT (National Register of Territorial Land Apportionment Journal)" (in Polish). 2008-06-01.