Tsaghkashat

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Tsaghkashat
Ծաղկաշատ
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Tsaghkashat
Coordinates: 41°04′36″N44°44′25″E / 41.07667°N 44.74028°E / 41.07667; 44.74028
Country Armenia
Marz (Province) Lori Province
Elevation
1,500 m (4,900 ft)
Population
 (2001)
  Total273
Time zone UTC+4

Tsaghkashat (Armenian : Ծաղկաշատ, also romanized as Tsakhkashat; formerly, Khachidur) is a town in the Lori Province of Armenia.

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