Tsai Ing-wen

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  1. Also translated as the Enforcement Act of Judicial Yuan Interpretation No. 748.

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Further reading

Tsai Ing-wen
蔡英文
Cai Ying Wen Guan Fang Yuan Shou Xiao Xiang Zhao .png
Official portrait, 2016
President of the Republic of China
Assumed office
20 May 2016
Political offices
Preceded by Minister of the Mainland Affairs Council
2000–2004
Succeeded by
Preceded by Vice Premier of the Republic of China
2006–2007
Succeeded by
Preceded by President of the Republic of China
2016–present
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by
Frank Hsieh
Acting
Leader of the Democratic Progressive Party
2008–2011
Succeeded by
Preceded by Leader of the Democratic Progressive Party
2011–2012
Succeeded by
Chen Chu
Acting
Preceded by DPP nominee for President of the Republic of China
2012, 2016, 2020
Most recent
Preceded by Leader of the Democratic Progressive Party
2014–2018
Succeeded by
Lin Yu-chang
Acting
Preceded by Leader of the Democratic Progressive Party
2020–present
Incumbent