Tsama Pueblo

Last updated
Tsama Pueblo
2008-37-2-wiyo.png
Tsama bowl, an example of Rio Grande White Ware
Nearest city Abiquiú, New Mexico
Coordinates 36°11′43″N106°12′52″W / 36.19528°N 106.21444°W / 36.19528; -106.21444 Coordinates: 36°11′43″N106°12′52″W / 36.19528°N 106.21444°W / 36.19528; -106.21444
Area24.3 acres (9.8 ha)
NRHP reference # 83004158 [1]
NMSRCP # 929
Significant dates
Added to NRHPNovember 17, 1983
Designated NMSRCPAugust 25, 1983

The Tsama Pueblo is a Tewa Pueblo ancestral site in an address-restricted area of Abiquiú, New Mexico. It was occupied from around 1250 until around 1500 and contained 1100 rooms. [2] The site and others in the area were explored by Florence Hawley Ellis in the 1960s and 1970s. [3] In 1983, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places listings in Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. [4] Tsama is located 3 miles (4.8 km) from the Poshuouinge site. [5] The Sapawe site is closely related. [6] In December 2008, The Archaeological Conservancy extended the Tsama Archaeological Preserve by 11.6523 acres, mostly cobble mulch garden plots which were likely once constructed by the residents of Tsama Pueblo. [7]

Abiquiú, New Mexico CDP in New Mexico, United States

Abiquiú is a small census-designated place located in Rio Arriba County, in northern New Mexico in the southwestern United States, about 53 miles (85 km) north of Santa Fe. Abiquiu has an elementary school which is part of the Espanola Public Schools.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Rio Arriba County, New Mexico Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Rio Arriba County, New Mexico.

Poshuouinge

Poshuouinge is a large ancestral Pueblo ruin located on U.S. Route 84, about 2.5 miles (4.0 km) south of Abiquiu, New Mexico. Its builders were the ancestors of the Tewa Pueblos who now (2011) reside in Santa Clara Pueblo and San Juan Pueblo. It has also been referred to informally as Turquoise Ruin, although there is no evidence that turquoise has ever been found in the area. Poshuouinge is situated 3 miles (4.8 km) upstream and due west of another Tewa Pueblo ancestral site, Tsama.

See also

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References

  1. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. 2010-07-09.
  2. Killion, Thomas W. (1992). Gardens of prehistory: the archaeology of settlement agriculture in Greater Mesoamerica. Society for American Archaeology. Meeting, University of Alabama Press. p. 56. ISBN   978-0-8173-0565-9 . Retrieved 27 September 2011.
  3. Kass-Simon, Gabriele (February 1993). Women of science: righting the record. Indiana University Press. p. 24. ISBN   978-0-253-20813-2 . Retrieved 27 September 2011.
  4. Capace, Nancy. Encyclopedia of New Mexico. North American Book Dist LLC. pp. 322–. ISBN   978-0-403-09607-7 . Retrieved 27 September 2011.
  5. Koenig, Harriet (March 2005). Acculturation in the Navajo Eden: New Mexico, 1550-1750, Archaeology, Language, Religion of the Peoples of the Southwest. YBK Publishers, Inc. pp. 90–. ISBN   978-0-9764359-1-4 . Retrieved 26 September 2011.
  6. Baker, Lee A.; Sundt, William M. (1990). Clues to the past: papers in honor of William M. Sundt. Archaeological Society of New Mexico. p. 89. Retrieved 27 September 2011.
  7. "The Archaeological Conservancy 2008 Annual Report" (PDF). Archaeological Conservancy. Archived from the original (PDF) on 7 July 2011. Retrieved 27 September 2011.Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)