Tsapatagh

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Coordinates: 40°24′27″N45°28′26″E / 40.40750°N 45.47389°E / 40.40750; 45.47389

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Tsapatagh

Ծափաթաղ
View from village Tsapatagh, Armenia.jpg
View of Lake Sevan from the village
Armenia adm location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Tsapatagh
Coordinates: 40°25′17″N45°32′00″E / 40.42139°N 45.53333°E / 40.42139; 45.53333
Country Flag of Armenia.svg  Armenia
Province Gegharkunik
Population
 (2011) [1]
  Total360
Time zone UTC+4 (AMT)
Area code(s) 1611 [2]
Tsapatagh at GEOnet Names Server

Tsapatagh (Armenian : Ծափաթաղ) is a resort village in the Shoghakat municipality of the Gegharkunik Province in Armenia, on the northeastern shore of Lake Sevan. [3]

Geography and nature

Scenery around Lake Sevan Sevan Lake - panoramio.jpg
Scenery around Lake Sevan
Hotel grounds with Lake Sevan in the background Tufenkian Avan Marak Tsapatagh hotel.jpg
Hotel grounds with Lake Sevan in the background

The village is located in the vicinity of the Tandzut river delta (not to be confused with identically named Tandzut river in the Lori province). [4] Other sources indicate different river names, the Tsapatagh river running through the village and the Shishkert river (or the Shampyrt river) to the southeast of the village. [5] In the surroundings of the village there is a 3,312 hectare large sanctuary with unique relict juniper and open oak woodlands with typical fauna and flora. [6] [7] The climate is somewhat milder than on the western shores and fruit trees like apricot trees can be grown.

Economy and tourism

The Tufenkian Hotel with adjacent solar photovoltaic installations is located in the village. To the southeast, another much larger photovoltaic station is being constructed as of 2020.

Historical heritage sites

There is a 3,000-year old burial area three kilometres to the east of the village. In the southeast, about 1.5 kilometres away, there is a cemetery with khachkars dating from between the 14th and 18th centuries. [4]

Demographics

Population

In 2014 there were 379 residents according to the local administration. [8] In 2018 there was only one child who begun attending the local school. [9]

Many of modern local residents relocated to the village from Kushchu village of Dashkasan, [10] as well as from Baku and Ganja around 1988–1989. [4] Quite a few of the houses are used only in summer by Yerevan residents.

Related Research Articles

Sevanavank

Sevanavank is a monastic complex located on a peninsula at the northwestern shore of Lake Sevan in the Gegharkunik Province of Armenia, not far from the town of Sevan. Initially the monastery was built at the southern shore of a small island. After the artificial draining of Lake Sevan, which started in the era of Joseph Stalin, the water level fell about 20 metres, and the island transformed into a peninsula. At the southern shore of this newly created peninsula, a guesthouse of the Armenian Writers' Union was built. The eastern shore is occupied by the Armenian president's summer residence, while the monastery's still active seminary moved to newly constructed buildings at the northern shore of the peninsula.

Nerkin Getashen Place in Gegharkunik, Armenia

Nerkin Getashen is a village in the Gegharkunik Province of Armenia, located along the southwestern coast of Lake Sevan. South of Nerkin Getashen lies Verin Getashen, founded 1828-29 by migrants from Mush and Alashkert, in present-day Eastern Turkey.

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Areguni Place in Gegharkunik, Armenia

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Artanish Place in Gegharkunik, Armenia

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Berdkunk Place in Gegharkunik, Armenia

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Chkalovka Place in Gegharkunik, Armenia

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Hayravank Place in Gegharkunik, Armenia

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Kalavan Place in Gegharkunik, Armenia

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Shoghakat, Armenia Place in Gegharkunik, Armenia

Shoghakat is a village and a rural community in the Gegharkunik Province of Armenia, located near Lake Sevan, northwest of the Artanish Peninsula. The village was populated by Azerbaijanis before the exodus of Azerbaijanis from Armenia after the outbreak of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict. In 1988-1989 Armenian refugees from Azerbaijan settled in the village.

Tsovinar, Armenia Place in Gegharkunik, Armenia

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Verin Getashen Place in Gegharkunik, Armenia

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Lchavan Place in Gegharkunik, Armenia

Lchavan is a village in the Gegharkunik Province of Armenia, located to the southeast of Lake Sevan.

Vanevan Monastery

Vanevan Monastery is a monastery located along a gorge south of the village of Artsvanist, southeast of Lake Sevan in the Gegharkunik Province of Armenia. The main church of Saint Grigor, was built in 903 by Prince Shapuh Bagratuni and his sister Mariam, siblings of King Smbat I. The church located on the southern end may have been built around the same time, while the gavit between the two was added at a later point in time. Saint Grigor was renovated and restored by King Gagik I of the Bagratid dynasty in the late 10th century. During this restoration a surrounding wall was built.

Kotavank

Kotavank is a church located on a hill overlooking the Argitchi River and village of Nerkin Getashen, south of Lake Sevan in the Gegharkunik Province of Armenia. A large medieval cemetery surrounds the church with numerous khachkars. A modern cemetery adjacent has started to encroach upon the old one, leaving many of the khachkars and ancient tombstones upturned in a pile, moved from their original locations. Upon a hill adjacent to the modern cemetery is yet another ancient cemetery with many khachkars. Within the village is a small ruined basilica called "Jam" by the locals with ancient khachkars and tombstones built into its walls, and not far away is a small shrine. There are also two large stone forts from the Middle Ages located 2 km to the east and 3 km the west of the village. Other khachkars may be seen along the main road leading to the hill where Kotavank rests upon. In early medieval years it was the capital of the region known during that time as Kot. Both Kotavank and Kot were partially destroyed during invasions in the 10th and 11th centuries and later by an earthquake.

References

  1. Statistical Committee of Armenia. "The results of the 2011 Population Census of the Republic of Armenia" (PDF).
  2. "Tzapatagh/Ծափաթաղ Postcode". armenia.postcode.info. Retrieved 2019-05-05.
  3. Kiesling, Brady; Kojian, Raffi (2005). Rediscovering Armenia: Guide (2nd ed.). Yerevan: Matit Graphic Design Studio. p. 82. ISBN   99941-0-121-8.
  4. 1 2 3 "Dictionary of settlements of Republic of Armenia" (PDF).
  5. "ЭКОЛОГИЯ ОЗЕРА СЕВАН В ПЕРИОД ПОВЫШЕНИЯ ЕГО УРОВНЯ" (PDF).
  6. "Story Map Journal". www.arcgis.com. Retrieved 2019-05-05.
  7. "mnp". www.mnp.am (in Amharic). Retrieved 2019-05-05.
  8. "Գեղարքունիքի մարզի Ծափաթաղ գյուղում բարելավվում են կենցաղային պայմանները". armenpress.am (in Armenian). Retrieved 2019-05-05.
  9. "Yerevan.Today | Ծափաթաղ գյուղի միակ առաջին դասարանցին". yerevan.today (in Armenian). Retrieved 2019-05-05.
  10. One, Studio. "Ծափաթաղ. փակ դռների ետևում միակ բնակիչը քամու սուլոցն է". www.yerkir.am (in Amharic). Retrieved 2019-05-05.