Tsarche fortress

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Tsarche fortress
Georgian :წარჩეს ციხე Abkhazian: Ҵарчатәи абааш
Tsarche in  Georgia, Abkhazia
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Tsarche fortress
Tsarche fortress
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Tsarche fortress
Tsarche fortress (Georgia)
Coordinates 42°42′30″N41°39′30″E / 42.70833°N 41.65833°E / 42.70833; 41.65833 Coordinates: 42°42′30″N41°39′30″E / 42.70833°N 41.65833°E / 42.70833; 41.65833
Site information
Conditionruins
DesignationsGeorgia cultural heritage monument

Tsarche fortress (Georgian :წარჩეს ციხე, Abkhazian : Ҵарчатәи абааш) is a ruined Early Medieval fortification near the village of Tsarche in Abkhazia, Georgia. [1]

History

The Tsarche fortress sits on the top of a hill, near confluence of rivers Okhoja and Chkhortoli. Contours of the fortress walls repeat an elliptical shape of the hill. The fortress lies in ruins; only a 7–8 m high northern arc survives. In the middle of the fortress, a narrow stone staircase runs to a combat path. The wall is supplied with a walking trail whose width could accommodate two persons at a time. In the southeastern section, there is a reservoir with plastered walls. [2]

The law of Georgia treats the monument as part of cultural heritage in the occupied territories and reported an urgent need of conservation. [2]

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References

  1. Fortress in Tsarche village Map of Architectural and Historical Buildings of Abkhazia
  2. 1 2 Gelenava, Irakli, ed. (2015). Cultural Heritage in Abkhazia (PDF). Tbilisi: Meridiani. pp. 68–69.