Tsarevich (disambiguation)

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Tsarevich is a Slavic title given to tsars' sons.

Tsarevich may also refer to:

Ivan Tsarevich

Ivan Tsarevich is one of the main heroes of Russian folklore, usually a protagonist, often engaged in a struggle with Koschei. Along with Ivan the Fool, Ivan Tsarevich is a placeholder name rather than a certain character. Tsarevich is a title given to the sons of tsars.

Tsarevich (Fabergé egg) Fabergé egg

The Tsarevich Egg, also known as the Czarevich Egg, is a Fabergé egg, one of a series of jewelled eggs made under the supervision of Peter Carl Fabergé. It was created in 1912 for Empress Alexandra Fyodorovna as a tribute by Fabergé to her son the Tsarevich Alexei (Alexei). The egg currently resides in the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, Virginia.

<i>The Tsarevich</i> (1929 film) 1929 film by Jacob Fleck

The Tsarevich is a 1929 German silent historical film directed by Jacob Fleck and Luise Fleck and starring Iván Petrovich, Marietta Millner and Albert Steinrück. The film's sets were designed by Willi Herrmann.

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Peter Carl Fabergé Russian jeweller

Peter Carl Fabergé, also known as Karl Gustavovich Fabergé, was a Russian jeweller best known for the famous Fabergé eggs made in the style of genuine Easter eggs, but using precious metals and gemstones rather than more mundane materials. He was the founder of the famous jewelry legacy House of Fabergé.

Fabergé egg Jeweled Easter eggs mostly made for the Czar of Russia

A Fabergé egg is a jewelled egg created by the House of Fabergé, in St. Petersburg, Imperial Russia. Virtually all were manufactured under the supervision of Peter Carl Fabergé between 1885 and 1917, the most famous being the 50 "Imperial" eggs, 43 of which survive, made for the Russian Tsars Alexander III and Nicholas II as Easter gifts for their wives and mothers.

Imperial Coronation (Fabergé egg) Fabergé egg

The Imperial Coronation egg is a jewelled Fabergé egg made under the supervision of the Russian jeweller Peter Carl Fabergé in 1897 by Fabergé ateliers, Mikhail Perkhin and Henrik Wigstrom. The egg was made to commemorate Tsaritsa, Empress Alexandra Fyodorovna.

House of Fabergé Russian jewelry firm

The House of Fabergé is a jewellery firm founded in 1842 in Saint Petersburg, Russia, by Gustav Faberge, using the accented name Fabergé. Gustav's sons, Peter Carl and Agathon, and grandsons followed him in running the business until it was nationalised by the Bolsheviks in 1918. The firm was famous for designing elaborate jewel-encrusted Fabergé eggs for the Russian Tsars, and for a range of other work of high quality and intricate detail. In 1924, Peter Carl's sons Alexander and Eugène Fabergé opened Fabergé & Cie in Paris, making similar jewellery items and adding the name of the city to their rival firm's trademark, styling it FABERGÉ, PARIS. In 1937, the rights to the Fabergé brand name were sold to Samuel Rubin for the marketing of perfume. The brand name was then resold in 1964 to cosmetics company Rayette Inc., which changed its name to Rayette-Fabergé Inc. As the name was resold more times, Fabergé companies launched clothing lines, the cologne Brut, the perfume Babe, hair products, and also undertook film production. The brand changed hands a few more times, and jewellery was eventually added back to the product lines. Next to branded Fabergé products, the world market has been continuously supplied with imitation "Fauxbergé" items and "Fabergé-style" products. Today, the brand is solely used for jewellery items and gem stones.

Steel Military (Fabergé egg) Fabergé egg

The Steel Military egg is one of a series of approximately 50 Russian jewelled Easter eggs created under the supervision of the Russian jeweller Peter Carl Fabergé. This particular egg was delivered to Alexandra Fyodorovna, the Russian Tsarina, on Easter Eve of 1916 on behalf of the last Tsar of Russia, Nicholas II by Fabergé's son Eugène while Nicholas II was away at the Russian front of World War I; Carl Fabergé was himself busy delivering the other Easter egg for 1916, the Order of St. George Egg, to Nicholas's mother, the Dowager Empress Maria. It is one of only ten Imperial eggs that were not sold following the Russian Revolution and subsequent execution of the immediate Imperial Romanov family, and is now held in the collection of the Kremlin Armoury.

Constellation (Fabergé egg) Fabergé egg

The Constellation Egg is one of two Easter eggs designed under the supervision of Peter Carl Fabergé in 1917, for the last Tsar of Russia, Nicholas II. It was the last Fabergé egg designed. It remains unfinished.

Romanov Tercentenary (Fabergé egg) Fabergé egg

The Romanov Tercentenary Egg is a jewelled Easter egg made under the supervision of the Russian jeweller Peter Carl Fabergé in 1913, for Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. It was presented by Nicolas II as an Easter gift to his wife, the Tsaritsa Alexandra Fyodorovna. It is currently held in the Kremlin Armoury Museum in Moscow.

Rothschild (Fabergé egg) 1902 Fabergé egg

The Rothschild egg is a jewelled, enameled, decorated egg that was made under the supervision of the Russian jeweller Peter Carl Fabergé by the workshop of Michael Perchin in 1902. Béatrice Ephrussi de Rothschild presented this egg to Germaine Halphen upon her engagement to Béatrice's younger brother, Édouard Alphonse James de Rothschild.

Rosebud (Fabergé egg) Fabergé egg

The Rosebud egg is a jewelled enameled Easter egg made by Michael Perchin under the supervision of the Russian jeweller Peter Carl Fabergé in 1895, for Nicholas II of Russia, who presented the egg to his wife, Empress Alexandra Feodorovna. It was the first egg that Nicholas presented to Alexandra.

The Colonnade egg is a jewelled enameled Easter egg made by Henrik Wigström under the supervision of the Russian jeweller Peter Carl Fabergé in 1910. The egg was made for Nicholas II of Russia, who presented it to his wife, Alexandra Feodorovna to celebrate the birth of their only son, the tsarevich Alexei. As a clock-egg, the Colonnade egg contained no surprise.

Red Cross with Imperial Portraits (Fabergé egg) Fabergé egg

The Red Cross with Imperial portraits egg is a jewelled and enameled Easter egg made by Henrik Wigström (1862–1923) under the supervision of the Russian jeweller Peter Carl Fabergé in 1915, for Nicholas II of Russia, who presented the egg to his mother, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna, in the same year.

Basket of Flowers (Fabergé egg) Fabergé egg

The Basket of Flowers egg is a jewelled enameled Easter egg made under the supervision of the Russian jeweller Peter Carl Fabergé in 1901. The egg was made for Nicholas II of Russia, who presented it to his wife, the Empress Alexandra Feodorovna.

Rose Trellis (Fabergé egg) Fabergé egg

The Rose Trellis Fabergé egg is a jewelled enameled imperial Easter egg made in Saint Petersburg, Russia under the supervision of the jeweler Peter Carl Fabergé in 1907, for Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. It was presented by Tsar Nicholas II to his wife, the Empress Alexandra Fyodorovna, on Easter 1907. It is now in the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland.

The Mosaic egg is a jewelled enameled Easter egg made under the supervision of the Russian jeweller Peter Carl Fabergé in 1914. The egg was made for Nicholas II of Russia, who presented it to his wife, the Empress Alexandra Feodorovna on Easter 1914. Its Easter 1914 counterpart is the Catherine the Great egg.

The Twelve Panel is a jewelled enameled Easter egg made under the supervision of the Russian jeweller Peter Carl Fabergé in 1899. The egg was made for Alexander Kelch, who presented it to his wife, Barbara (Varvara) Kelch-Bazanova.

Fabergé Museum Museum in Baden-Baden

The Fabergé Museum is a privately owned museum located in the German spa city of Baden-Baden, dedicated to items made by the Russian jewellery firm Fabergé. It was opened by Russian art collector Alexander Ivanov on 15 May 2009.

<i>The Tsarevich</i> (1933 film) 1933 film by Victor Janson

The Tsarevich is a 1933 German historical musical film directed by Victor Janson and starring Mártha Eggerth, Hans Söhnker and Ery Bos. It is based on the 1927 operetta Der Zarewitsch by Franz Lehar. It was one of a number of operetta film that Eggerth appeared in during the decade.

<i>The Little Czar</i> 1954 film by Arthur Maria Rabenalt

The Little Czar is a 1954 French-German historical drama film directed by Arthur Maria Rabenalt and starring Luis Mariano, Sonja Ziemann and Iván Petrovich. It is based on the operetta Der Zarewitsch by Franz Lehár. It was shot in Eastmancolor.