Tscherim Soobzokov

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Tscherim Soobzokov
Native name
Щэбзыхъуэ Чэрим
Born24 August 1924
Died9 September 1985
Paterson, New Jersey, United States
AllegianceFlag of the United States.svg  United States

Tscherim Soobzokov (Adyghe : Щэбзыхъуэ Чэрим, romanized: Şəbzıxhwə Çərim; Russian : Черим Сообцоков, romanized: Cherim Soobtsokov) (24 August 1924 – 9 September 1985 [1] ) was a Circassian spy, politician, soldier, and an anti-Soviet pro-independence activist. He rose to prominence in the New Jersey Democratic Party and the Circassian community in Paterson, New Jersey. [2] During the Cold War, Soobzokov served the CIA as an anti-Soviet operative.

Contents

He was accused of collaborating with Nazi Germany during the invasion of the Soviet Union's North Caucasus before coming to the United States, but denied these allegations and sued CBS and The New York Times, and won. [3] :170–174 Soobzokov was murdered by a pipe bomb at his house, allegedly by the Jewish Defense League. He was publicly supported by Pat Buchanan [4] and Congressman Robert Roe. [3] :113

Background

According to the far-right organization Jewish Defense League, during World War II in August 1942 he recruited Circassians in 1943-1944 to the Wehrmacht, and in early 1945, he was promoted to lieutenant of the SS. Richard Breitman also claimed that Soobzokov had ties to the SS. [5]

In 2006, declassified documents of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) confirmed that Soobzokov had been a CIA agent in Jordan. [6] This was part of a wider post-World War II CIA program. [7]

On 15 August 1985, a pipe bomb set outside his home in Paterson, New Jersey critically injured Soobzokov. [8] [9] He died of his wounds in the hospital on 9 September 1985. [10] An anonymous caller claiming to represent the Jewish Defense League (JDL) said they had carried out the bombing. A spokesman for the JDL later denied responsibility. [11] No one was ever charged with leaving either bomb, but Aslan Soobzokov (Tscherim's son) has twice sued the federal government over its investigation. The bombing was linked by the FBI to a similar bomb attack on Elmārs Sproģis, that took place in Long Island on the day Soobzokov died. [3] :179–180

See also

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References

  1. Richard Breitman. "Tscherim Soobzokov" (PDF). Government Secrecy e-Prints. Federation of American Scientists.
  2. Shane, Scott (7 June 2006). "C.I.A. Knew Where Eichmann Was Hiding, Documents Show". The New York Times.
  3. 1 2 3 Lichtblau, Eric (2014). The Nazis Next Door: How America Became a Safe Haven for Hitler's Men . New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. ISBN   978-0-547-66919-9.
  4. Pat Buchanan (5 November 1999). "Response to Norman Podhoretz". letter to The Wall Street Journal . Archived from the original on 11 May 2008.
  5. "CIA declassifies 27,000 Nazi files". The Washington Times . 6 June 2006.
  6. "New Records Now Available as a Result of IWG Extension – CIA Agrees to Disclose Operational Materials". Press Release. National Archives and Records Administration. 6 June 2006.
  7. Toby Harnden (14 November 2010). "Secret papers reveal Nazis given 'safe haven' in US". The Telegraph. Archived from the original on 16 November 2010.
  8. Ralph Blumenthal (16 August 1985). "Man Accused of Nazi Past Injured by Bomb in Jersey". The New York Times : B2.
  9. "Bomb Victim on Critical List". The New York Times . AP. 17 August 1985.
  10. Eric Lichtblau (13 November 2010). "Nazis Were Given 'Safe Haven' in U.S., Report Says". The New York Times : A1.
  11. Judith Cummings (9 November 1985). "F.B.I. Says Jewish Defense League May Have Planted Fatal Bombs". The New York Times : A1.