Tsiigehtchic

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Tsiigehtchic
Tsiigehtshik
Charter Community
Charter Community of Tsiigehtchic
TsiigehtchicChurchWaterAN.JPG
The Church in Tsiigehtchic with the Arctic Red River and Mackenzie River in the background
NWT All Region Locator.svg
Red pog.svg
Tsiigehtchic
Canada location map 2.svg
Red pog.svg
Tsiigehtchic
Coordinates: 67°26′26″N133°44′43″W / 67.44056°N 133.74528°W / 67.44056; -133.74528 Coordinates: 67°26′26″N133°44′43″W / 67.44056°N 133.74528°W / 67.44056; -133.74528
CountryCanada
Territory Northwest Territories
Region Inuvik Region
Constituency Mackenzie Delta
Census division Region 1
Mission1868
Charter Community21 June 1993
Government
  ChiefPhillip Blake
  Senior Administrative OfficerJeff Mercier
   MLA Frederick Blake Jr.
Area
[1]
  Land48.98 km2 (18.91 sq mi)
Elevation
6 m (20 ft)
Population
 (2011) [1]
  Total172
  Density3.5/km2 (9/sq mi)
Time zone UTC−07:00 (MST)
  Summer (DST) UTC−06:00 (MDT)
Canadian Postal code
X0E 0B0
Area code(s) 867
Telephone exchange 953
- Living cost167.5 A
- Food price index170.3 B
Sources:Department of Municipal and Community Affairs, [2]
Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre, [3]
Canada Flight Supplement [4]
^A 2013 figure based on Edmonton = 100 [5]
^B 2015 figure based on Yellowknife = 100 [5]

Tsiigehtchic ( /ˈtsɡɛɪk/ TSEE-getch-ik; "mouth of the iron river"), officially the Charter Community of Tsiigehtchic, [2] is a Gwich'in community located at the confluence of the Mackenzie and the Arctic Red Rivers, in the Inuvik Region of the Northwest Territories, Canada. The community was formerly known as Arctic Red River, until 1 April 1994. The Gwichya Gwich'in First Nation is located in Tsiigehtchic.

Contents

Demographics

Federal census population history of Tsiigehtchic
YearPop.±%
1976121    
1981120−0.8%
1986108−10.0%
1991 144+33.3%
1996 162+12.5%
2001 195+20.4%
2006 175−10.3%
2011 143−18.3%
2016 172+20.3%
2021 138−19.8%
Source: Statistics Canada
[6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [1] [13]
Annual population estimates
YearPop.±%
1996168    
1997169+0.6%
1998165−2.4%
1999188+13.9%
2000192+2.1%
2001195+1.6%
2002213+9.2%
2003209−1.9%
2004202−3.3%
2005190−5.9%
2006181−4.7%
YearPop.±%
2007177−2.2%
2008159−10.2%
2009154−3.1%
2010154+0.0%
2011152−1.3%
2012150−1.3%
2013162+8.0%
2014167+3.1%
2015167+0.0%
2016170+1.8%
2017179+5.3%
Sources: NWT Bureau of Statistics (2001 - 2017) [14]

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, Tsiigehtchic recorded a population of 138 living in 59 of its 73 total private dwellings, a change of

In 2016, 130 people identified as First Nations and 10 as Inuit. However, only 5 people said that an Indigenous language (Gwich’in) was their mother tongue. [1]

Transportation

The Dempster Highway, NWT Highway 8, crosses the Mackenzie River at Tsiigehtchic. [15] During winter, vehicle traffic is over the ice, during the rest of the year, traffic is carried by the ferry MV Louis Cardinal.

The ferry stops at Tsiigehtchic, on the eastern bank of the Arctic Red River, and on the southwestern and northeastern banks of the Mackenzie River, connecting the two legs of the Dempster Highway. The community is one of the few in the NWT not to be served by a permanent airport.

Tsiigehtchic from the Dempster Highway, looking towards Inuvik Panorama Tsiigehtchic.jpg
Tsiigehtchic from the Dempster Highway, looking towards Inuvik

Steppe bison carcass

In early September 2007, near Tsiigehtchic, local resident Shane Van Loon discovered a carcass of a steppe bison, which was radiocarbon dated to c. 13,650 cal BP. [16] This carcass appears to represent the first Pleistocene mummified soft tissue remains from the glaciated regions of northern Canada (Zazula et al. 2009). [16]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Northwest Territories)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  2. 1 2 "NWT Communities - Tsiigehtchic". Government of the Northwest Territories: Department of Municipal and Community Affairs. Retrieved 2014-01-29.
  3. "Northwest Territories Official Community Names and Pronunciation Guide". Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre . Yellowknife: Education, Culture and Employment, Government of the Northwest Territories. Archived from the original on 2016-01-13. Retrieved 2016-01-13.
  4. Canada Flight Supplement. Effective 0901Z 16 July 2020 to 0901Z 10 September 2020.
  5. 1 2 Tsiigehtchic - Statistical Profile at the GNWT
  6. "1981 Census of Canada: Census subdivisions in decreasing population order" (PDF). Statistics Canada. May 1992. Retrieved February 1, 2021.
  7. "1986 Census: Population - Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions" (PDF). Statistics Canada. September 1987. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  8. "91 Census: Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions - Population and Dwelling Counts" (PDF). Statistics Canada. April 1992. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  9. "96 Census: A National Overview - Population and Dwelling Counts" (PDF). Statistics Canada. April 1997. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  10. "Population and Dwelling Counts, for Canada, Provinces and Territories, and Census Subdivisions (Municipalities), 2001 and 1996 Censuses - 100% Data (Northwest Territories)". Statistics Canada. August 15, 2012. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  11. "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2006 and 2001 censuses - 100% data (Northwest Territories)". Statistics Canada. August 20, 2021. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  12. "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses (Northwest Territories)". Statistics Canada. July 25, 2021. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  13. 1 2 "Population and dwelling counts: Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), Northwest Territories". Statistics Canada. February 9, 2022. Retrieved February 18, 2022.
  14. Population Estimates By Community from the GNWT
  15. "Canadian Ferry Operators Association 2006 Annual Report". Canadian Ferry Operators Association. 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-11-22.
  16. 1 2 Zazula, Grant D.; MacKay, Glen; Andrews, Thomas D.; et al. (December 2009). "A late Pleistocene steppe bison (Bison priscus) partial carcass from Tsiigehtchic, Northwest Territories, Canada". Quaternary Science Reviews. 28 (25–26): 2734–2742. doi:10.1016/j.quascirev.2009.06.012.

Further reading