Tsubame gaeshi

Last updated
Tsubame gaeshi
Classification Nage-waza
Sub classification Ashi-waza
Kodokan Yes
Technique name
Rōmaji Tsubame gaeshi
Japanese燕返し
EnglishSwallow counter

Tsubame Gaeshi (燕返し) is a Judo throw that falls within the seventeen techniques of the Shimmeisho no waza, officially recognised by the Kodokan in 1982. [1] Literally translated as "Swallow Counter", Tsubame gaeshi is the countering of an ashi waza with Deashi harai from the opposite leg. A right-handed Deashi-harai executed by uke, for instance, would be avoided by tori bending his right knee, followed by a left-handed Deashi-harai. Tsubame gaeshi as a counter against uke's Deashi harai is the opening move of the Kaeshi-no-kata. As a counter against Okuriashi harai, it forms the sixth technique of the Nage-Waza-Ura-no-kata. [2]

The name Tsubame Gaeshi is a reference to the famous technique of the legendary Japanese swordsman Sasaki Kojirō. It was an overhead katana (or, in Sasaki's case, a nodachi ) stroke that was performed so swiftly it resembled the flight of a sparrow, hence the name. [3]

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Judo Modern martial art, combat and Olympic sport

Judo is generally categorized as a modern Japanese martial art, which has since evolved into a combat and Olympic sport. The sport was created in 1882 by Jigoro Kano (嘉納治五郎) as a physical, mental, and moral pedagogy in Japan. With its origins coming from jujutsu, judo's most prominent feature is its competitive element, where the objective is to either throw or take down an opponent to the ground, immobilize or otherwise subdue an opponent with a pin, or force an opponent to submit with a joint lock or a choke. Strikes and thrusts by hands and feet as well as weapons defences are a part of judo, but only in pre-arranged forms and are not allowed in judo competition or free practice. It was also referred to as Kanō Jiu-Jitsu until the introduction to the Olympic Games. A judo practitioner is called a "judoka", and the judo uniform is called "judogi".

Nage-no-kata Martial arts forms/techniques

Nage-no-kata is one of the two randori-no-kata of Kodokan Judo. It is intended as an illustration of the various concepts of nage-waza that exist in judo, and is used both as a training method and as a demonstration of understanding.

Kōdōkan Goshin Jutsu or Kōdōkan goshinjutsu is the most recent Judo kata of Kodokan and was established in 1956. Compared to Kime no kata it is a more modern set of self-defence techniques. Instead of attacks with swords, the kata contains defences against attacks with stick and pistol.

Deashi harai Judo technique

Deashi Harai (出足払), more accurately romanized: Deashibarai, is one of the original 40 throws of Judo as developed by Jigoro Kano. It belongs to the first group, Dai-Ikkyo, of the traditional throwing list, Gokyo-no-Nagewaza, of Kodokan Judo. It is also part of the current 67 Throws of Kodokan Judo. It is classified as a foot technique, Ashi-Waza. Deashi Harai is also one of the 20 techniques in Danzan Ryu's (DZR) Nagete list.

Uki goshi Judo technique

Uki Goshi (浮腰) is one of the original 40 throws of Judo as developed by Jigoro Kano. It belongs to the first group, Dai Ikkyo, of the traditional throwing list, Gokyo, of Kodokan Judo. It is also part of the current 67 Throws of Kodokan Judo. It is classified as a hip technique, Koshi-Waza. Uki goshi is known as a favorite throw of Jigoro Kano himself. It is demonstrated in the Nage no Kata. It used to be much drilled in traditional judo dojos.

O goshi Judo technique

Ō goshi is one of the original 40 throws of Judo as compiled by Jigoro Kano.

Kata gatame Judo technique

Kata-Gatame (肩固) is one of the seven mat holds, Osaekomi-waza, of Kodokan Judo. It is also one of the 25 techniques of Danzan Ryu's constriction arts, Shimete, list. In grappling terms, it is categorized as a side control hold. Primarily used as a hold down in Judo, it is mostly used as a choke in Jiu-Jitsu and mixed martial arts. WWE wrestler Braun Strowman and former Impact Wrestling Superstar, Samuel Shaw use this move as their finishing maneuver.

Ippon seoi nage Judo technique

The ippon seoi nage (一本背負投) is a throw in judo. It is a variant of Seoi nage, and is one of the nineteen accepted techniques in Shinmeisho No Waza of Kodokan Judo. It is classified as a hand throwing technique, or te-waza.

Yoko wakare Judo technique

Yoko wakare (横分) is one of the original 40 throws of Judo as developed by Jigoro Kano. It belongs to the fifth group,

Yoko guruma Judo technique

Yoko Guruma (横車), is one of the original 40 throws of judo as developed by Jigoro Kano. It belongs to the fifth group, Gokyo, of the traditional throwing list, Gokyo, of Kodokan Judo. It is also part of the current 67 throws of Kodokan Judo. It is classified as a side sacrifice technique, Yoko-sutemi. This technique is considerably difficult to perform, and can be used as either a direct attack or a counter. In classical study of nage-waza, it is preferable to use it as a counter throw to seoi-nage.

Hikikomi Gaeshi (引込返), also known as pulling-in counter, is one of the preserved throwing techniques, Habukareta Waza, of judo. It belonged to the fourth group, Yonkyo, of the 1895 Gokyo no Waza lists. It is categorized as a front sacrifice technique, Ma-sutemi.

Kibisu gaeshi Judo technique

Kibisu gaeshi (踵返) is a single leg takedown or "Ankle Pick" adopted later by the Kodokan into their Shinmeisho No Waza list. It is categorized as a hand technique, Te-waza.

Kouchi Gaeshi (小内返し) is one of the techniques adopted later by the Kodokan into their Shinmeisho No Waza list. The technique is executed by first dodging Uke's Kouchi gari, thereby forcing them off balance, and subsequently throwing Uke to the left or right by twisting their hands. Therefore, it is categorized as a hand technique (Te-waza).

Harai Goshi Gaeshi (払腰返) is a hip sweep counter in judo. It is one of the techniques adopted later by the Kodokan into their Shinmeisho No Waza list. It is categorized as a foot technique, Ashi-waza.

Hane Goshi Gaeshi is a throw in judo and is categorized as a foot technique, Ashi-waza. It is one of the techniques adopted later by the Kodokan into their Shinmeisho No Waza list.

Gonosen-no-kata is a judo kata that focuses on counter-attacks to throwing techniques. It is not an officially recognized kata of judo, but its importance is attested to by its inclusion in Kawaishi's The complete seven katas of judo. Writing in the early post-war period, Kawaishi described the kata as being practiced less in Japan than in Europe.

Practice of Kaeshi no Kata is almost entirely limited to Great-Britain, where until today it has been understood as a judo kata which, like the Gonosen-no-kata, focuses on counter-attacks to throwing techniques. The kata was commonly explained as being an older form than Gonosen-no-kata, that was passed onto Ōtani Masutarō from Tani Yukio.

The Nage-waza ura-no-kata is a judo kata that, like the Gonosen-no-kata, focuses on counter-attacks to throwing techniques. It was developed by Mifune Kyūzō, and is not an officially recognized Kodokan kata.

References

  1. Kano, Jigoro (1986), Kodokan Judo, Tokyo: Kodansha
  2. Mifune, Kyuzo (2004), Canon of Judo, Tokyo: Kodansha
  3. Lowry, Dave (1986). Bokken: Art of the Japanese Sword. Ohara Publications. p. 2122. ISBN   978-0-89750-104-0.