Tukchang

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Tŭkchang District

득장지구
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl
   Hancha
   McCune–Reischauer Tŭkchang-jigu
   Revised Romanization Deukjang-jigu
DPRK2006 Pyongnam-Dukjang.PNG
Country North Korea
Province South P'yŏngan
Administrative divisions 4 workers' districts
Population
 (2008)
  Total50,033 [1]

Tŭkchang District is a chigu in South P'yŏngan province, North Korea.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

South Pyongan Province Province in Kwanso, North Korea

South Pyongan Province is a province of North Korea. The province was formed in 1896 from the southern half of the former Pyongan Province, remained a province of Korea until 1945, then became a province of North Korea. Its capital is Pyongsong.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers and to the south it is bordered by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Contents

Tŭkchang was established as its own administrative area after separating from Pukch'ang in 1995.

Pukchang County County in South Pyŏngan, North Korea

Pukch'ang County is a kun (county) in South P'yŏngan province, North Korea.

Administrative districts

The district is split into four rodongjagu (workers' districts)in 1995:

  • Kalgol-lodongjagu (갈골로동자구/갈골労働者区)
  • Tŭkchang-rodongjagu (득장로동자구/得將労働者区)
  • Myŏnghang-rodongjagu (명학로동자구/鳴鶴労働者区)
  • Poŏp-rodongjagu (보업로동자구/甫業労働者区)

The district is split into nine dong (neighborhoods) in 2008.

Transportation

Tŭkchang district is served by Myŏnghak Station in Myŏnghang-rodongjagu, the terminus of a branchline of the Korean State Railway's P'yŏngdŏk Line.

Korean State Railway

The Korean State Railway is the operating arm of the Ministry of Railways of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and has its headquarters at P'yŏngyang. The current Minister of Railways is Jang Hyuk, who has held the position since 2015.

Pyongdok Line

The P'yŏngdŏk Line is an electrified standard-gauge trunk line of the Korean State Railway in North Korea running from Taedonggang Station in P'yŏngyang, where it connects to the P'yŏngbu, P'yŏngnam, P'yŏngra and P'yŏngŭi Lines, to Kujang, where it connects to the Manp'o and Ch'ŏngnyŏn P'arwŏn Lines. The total length of the line is 192.3 km (119.5 mi).

Prison Camp

Political Prison Camp No. 18 is a large prison labour colony in Tŭkchang district and Pukch'ang County at the banks of Taedong River. In 1995, Camp 18 Tukchang part was returned to ordinary society and is called “Tukchang Coal Mine Complex”(득장지구탄광련합기업소). [2] [3] The camp was dismantled in 2006 and maybe reopened in 2016. [4] [5]

Pukch'ang concentration camp is a labor camp in North Korea for political prisoners. It is sometimes called Tŭkchang concentration camp. The official name is Kwan-li-so No. 18.

Taedong River river in North Korea

The Taedong River is a large river in the North Korea. It rises in the Rangrim Mountains of the country's north. It then flows southwest into Korea Bay at Namp'o. In between, it runs through the country's capital, Pyongyang. Along the river are landmarks such as the Juche Tower and Kim Il-sung Square.

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North Korea's political penal labour colonies, transliterated kwalliso or kwan-li-so, constitute one of three forms of political imprisonment in the country, the other two being what Hawk translated as "short-term detention/forced-labor centers" and "long-term prison labor camps", for misdemeanour and felony offenses respectively. In total, there are an estimated 80,000 to 120,000 political prisoners.

The Tŭkchang Line is an electrified railway line of the Korean State Railway in South P'yŏngan Province, North Korea, running from Pukch'ang on the P'yŏngdŏk Line to Sŏksan.

References

  1. DPR Korean Central Bureau of Statistics: 2008 Population Census (Population 2008, Published in 2009)
  2. <설 특집> ⑤명절이 슬픈 탈북자 망향가
  3. 「私は政治犯収容所に10年いた」(Rimjingang)
  4. Has Camp 18 been re-opened or merged with Camp 14?(North Korea Economy Watch)
  5. Committee for Human Rights in North Korea: The Hidden Gulag (Section: Testimony Kwan-li-so No. 18 Bukchang, p. 69 - 76)