Turakina River

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Turakina River
Turakina River from SH3 bridge, after 13 Dec 2021 flood.jpg
Turakina River. looking south west from SH3 bridge, after 13 Dec 2021 flood
Turakina River
Etymology Māori meaning "tree felled across a river for a bridge"
Native nameTurakina  (Māori)
Location
CountryNew Zealand
Region Manawatū-Whanganui
Settlements Papanui Junction, Turakina, Koitiata
Physical characteristics
Source5 km (3.1 mi) south west of Waiouru
  coordinates 39°31′0″S175°37′57″E / 39.51667°S 175.63250°E / -39.51667; 175.63250
  elevation900 metres (3,000 ft)
Mouth Tasman Sea
  location
Koitiata
  coordinates
40°03′58″S175°07′35″E / 40.06611°S 175.12639°E / -40.06611; 175.12639 Coordinates: 40°03′58″S175°07′35″E / 40.06611°S 175.12639°E / -40.06611; 175.12639
  elevation
Sea level
Length137 kilometres (85 mi)
Basin size962 square kilometres (371 sq mi)
Discharge 
  average12,528 cubic metres (442,400 cu ft)/day
Basin features
River system Turakina River
Tributaries 
  left Mangapapa River

The Turakina River is a river of the southwestern North Island of New Zealand. It flows generally southwestward from its source south of Waiouru, [1] roughly paralleling the larger Whangaehu River, and reaches the Tasman Sea 20 kilometres (12 mi) southeast of Whanganui. [2]

The river flows near Papanui Junction and Turakina. sites existed at Te Maire, Pukemata, Toakaituna, and Maipaua. [3] Donald McLean arranged signing of the Rangitīkei–Turakina deed with some of the owners on 15 May 1849, [4] when The Crown claimed the Rangitīkei Block. [5] Scottish settlers arrived from the late 1860s. [6]

Floods on the Turakina are frequent, including 1897, [7] 1920, [8] 1939, [9] 1940, [10] 2013, [11] 2015, [12] 2017 [13] and 2021. [14]

Te Araroa long-distance walkway crosses the river at the beach at Koitiata at low tide. [15] The outlet of the river changes frequently, moving up to 4.5 km (3 mi) along the lagoon, which is formed by a sand bar. [16] [17] [2] In 1997 an outlet was dug to reduce flooding. [18] [19]

12% of samples taken at the lagoon in 5 years to 2022 found E. coli levels too high for swimming. [20] 81.1% of land in the catchment is used for animal grazing. Native bush covers only 8.5%. [1]

Redfin bully live in the river. [1]

Turakina Valley Road closely follows the river for 104 km (65 mi) between Tangiwai and Turakina. [21] Much of it is a gravel road. [22]

The river is crossed by SH3 and by the Marton–New Plymouth railway. [2]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Environmental monitoring data for Turakina". Land, Air, Water Aotearoa (LAWA). Retrieved 2 January 2022.
  2. 1 2 3 "Turakina River, Manawatu-Wanganui". NZ Topo Map. Retrieved 2 January 2022.
  3. "Schedule to the deed of settlement of the Historical Claims of Ngati Apa" (PDF). 8 October 2008.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. "Report on aspects of the Wai 655 claim" (PDF). Waitangi Tribunal. 2009.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. "Turakina | NZHistory, New Zealand history online". nzhistory.govt.nz. Retrieved 2 January 2022.
  6. "Forging a region, 1870s–1920s". teara.govt.nz. Retrieved 2 January 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  7. "The Whole of the Turakina Valley Inundated. WANGANUI HERALD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 17 April 1897. Retrieved 2 January 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  8. "RANGITIKEI COUNTY COUNCIL. TAIHAPE DAILY TIMES". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 5 October 1920. Retrieved 2 January 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. "August 1939 Manawatu-Wanganui Flooding". hwe.niwa.co.nz. Retrieved 2 January 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  10. "February 1940 North Island and West Coast Flooding". hwe.niwa.co.nz. Retrieved 2 January 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  11. "Turakina farmland remains under water". Stuff. 17 October 2013. Retrieved 2 January 2022.
  12. "June 2015" (PDF).{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  13. "Significant flood levels for Whanganui, Whangaehu and Turakina Rivers". 4 April 2017.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  14. "'Tourists' made heavy rain and flooding seem worse, say residents". Stuff. 14 December 2021. Retrieved 2 January 2022.
  15. "Manawatū-Whanganui trail notes". www.teararoa.org.nz. Retrieved 2 January 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  16. "Koitiata" . Retrieved 2 January 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  17. "1:63360 map Sheet: N143 Marton". www.mapspast.org.nz. 1975. Retrieved 2 January 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  18. "Trench cut to release Turakina floodwater. Wanganui Chronicle" (PDF). 14 January 1997.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  19. "1997: Second attempt to drain the water" (PDF).{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  20. "Turakina River". Land, Air, Water Aotearoa (LAWA). Retrieved 2 January 2022.
  21. "Tangiwai to 3 Turakina Valley Road". Google maps. Retrieved 2 January 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  22. "Mangara Stream, Manawatu-Wanganui". NZ Topo Map. Retrieved 2 January 2022.