Twenty pounds (British coin)

Last updated
Twenty pounds
United Kingdom
Value£20
Mass15.71 g
Diameterapprox 27 mm
EdgeMilled
Composition.999 fine silver
Years of minting2013-present
Obverse
British twenty pound coin 2013 obverse.png
Design Queen Elizabeth II
Designer Ian Rank-Broadley
Design date1998
Reverse
British twenty pound coin 2013 reverse.png
DesignNo standard reverse design;

The British twenty pound (£20) coin is a commemorative denomination of sterling coinage, first issued by the Royal Mint in 2013. [1] It is minted in .999 fine silver. [2] Twenty pound coins are legal tender [3] but are intended as souvenirs and are almost never seen in general circulation.

Contents

Design

The designs which have appeared on the twenty pound coin's reverse are summarised in the table below.

Welsh Dragon £20

From 2016-2020 the royal mint has produced a Welsh Dragon £20 on a backdrop of the Visitor centre at the Royal mint experience. Some of these years have been accompanied by the same coin on a backdrop of the Welsh flag. The Visitor centre coin could only be purchased at the shop. [4]

YearEventDesign [5] Edge InscriptionDesigner
2013- Saint George and the Dragon Milled Benedetto Pistrucci
2014The 100th anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War Britannia and a lion on the left-hand side with warships in the background. An inscription above and to the right reads THE FIRST WORLD WAR, and below and to the left of that the dates 1914-1918John Bergdahl
2015The 50th anniversary of Sir Winston Churchill's deathWinston ChurchillEtienne Millner
The Longest Reigning MonarchThe five portraits of Queen Elizabeth II to appear on British coinage above the words "EIIR The Longest Reign"Stephen Taylor
201690th Birthday of Queen Elizabeth IIThe royal cypher wreathed and crowned, all surrounded by rosesChristopher Hobbs
Welsh Dragon CelebrationThe Welsh dragonNorman Sillman
Christmas The nativity Gregory Cameron
2017Platinum Wedding Anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince PhilipEquestrian portrait of the Queen and Prince PhilipJohn Bergdahl
2019Welsh Dragon CelebrationThe Welsh dragonNorman Sillman

The prolific issuance since 2013 of silver commemorative £20, £50 and £100 coins at face value has led to attempts to spend or deposit these coins, [1] prompting the Royal Mint to clarify the legal tender status of these silver coins. [6] [7] Royal Mint guidelines advise that, although these coins were approved as legal tender, they are considered limited edition collectables not intended for general circulation.

Related Research Articles

Coins of the pound sterling British current and historic coinage

The standard circulating coinage of the United Kingdom, British Crown Dependencies and British Overseas Territories is denominated in pennies and pounds sterling, and ranges in value from one penny sterling to two pounds. Since decimalisation, on 15 February 1971, the pound has been divided into 100 (new) pence. Before decimalisation, twelve pence made a shilling, and twenty shillings made a pound.

There are eight euro coin denominations, ranging from one cent to two euros. The coins first came into use in 2002. They have a common reverse, portraying a map of Europe, but each country in the eurozone has its own design on the obverse, which means that each coin has a variety of different designs in circulation at once. Four European microstates that are not members of the European Union use the euro as their currency and also have the right to mint coins with their own designs on the obverse side.

Twenty pence (British coin) British decimal coin

The British decimal twenty pence coin is a denomination of sterling coinage worth 1/5 of a pound. Like the 50p coin, it is an equilateral curve heptagon. Its obverse has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the coin's introduction on 9 June 1982. Four different portraits of the Queen have been used; the latest design by Jody Clark was introduced in 2015. The second and current reverse, featuring a segment of the Royal Shield, was introduced in 2008.

Fifty pence (British coin) British decimal coin; half of one pound sterling

The British decimal fifty pence coin is a denomination of sterling coinage worth one half of a pound. It is a seven-sided coin formed as an equilateral-curve heptagon, or Reuleaux polygon, a curve of constant width, meaning that the diameter is constant across any bisection. Its obverse has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the coin's introduction in 1969. Four different portraits of the Queen have been used, with the latest design by Jody Clark being introduced in 2015. The second and current reverse, featuring a segment of the Royal Shield, was introduced in 2008.

Two pounds (British coin) British coin denominating two pounds sterling

The British two pound (£2) coin is a denomination of sterling coinage. Its obverse has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the coin’s introduction. Three different portraits of the Queen have been used, with the current design by Jody Clark being introduced in 2015. The reverse design features Britannia.

One pound (British coin) British coin, denomination of the pound sterling

The British one pound (£1) coin is a denomination of sterling coinage. Its obverse bears the Latin engraving ELIZABETH II D G REG F D meaning, 'Elizabeth II, by the grace of God, Queen, Defender of the Faith'. It has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the original coin's introduction on 21 April 1983. Four different portraits of the Queen have been used, with the latest design by Jody Clark being introduced in 2015. The design on the reverse side of the current, 12-sided coin features four emblems to represent each of the nations of the United Kingdom — the English rose, the leek for Wales, the Scottish thistle, and the shamrock for Northern Ireland, also two or three oak leaves — emerging from a single 5-branched stem within a crown. In May 2022 the Royal Mint announced that the Kenyan-born artist Michael Armitage is designing a new £1 coin which will be issued in 2023 and will celebrate the "history of the UK in the 21st century".

The British five pound (£5) coin is a commemorative denomination of sterling coinage. Its obverse has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the coin’s introduction in 1990. Two different portraits of the Queen have graced the coin, with the latest design by Ian Rank-Broadley being introduced in 1998. The coin has no standard reverse; instead it is altered each year to commemorate important events. Variant obverses have also been used on occasion.

Crown (British coin) British coin introduced in 1707

The British crown was a denomination of sterling coinage worth 1/4 of one pound, or 5 shillings, or 60 pence. The crown was first issued during the reign of Edward VI, as part of the coinage of the Kingdom of England.

Legal tender is a form of money that courts of law are required to recognize as satisfactory payment for any monetary debt. Each jurisdiction determines what is legal tender, but essentially it is anything which when offered ("tendered") in payment of a debt extinguishes the debt. There is no obligation on the creditor to accept the tendered payment, but the act of tendering the payment in legal tender discharges the debt.

Quarter (Canadian coin) Canadian coin worth 25 cents

The quarter, short for quarter dollar, is a Canadian coin worth 25 cents or one-fourth of a Canadian dollar. It is a small, circular coin of silver colour. According to the Royal Canadian Mint, the official name for the coin is the 25-cent piece, but in practice it is usually called a "quarter", much like its American counterpart. In French, it is called a caribou or trente sous. The coin is produced at the Royal Canadian Mint's facility in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

British twenty-five pence coin British commemorative coin

The British decimal twenty-five pence (25p) coin was a commemorative denomination of sterling coinage issued in four designs between 1972 and 1981. These coins were a post-decimalisation continuation of the traditional crown, with the same value of a quarter of a pound. Uniquely in British decimal coinage, the coins do not have their value stated on them. This is because previous crowns rarely did so. The British regular issue coin closest to the coin’s nominal value is the twenty pence coin.

There have been three sets of coins in Ireland since independence. In all three, the coin showed a Celtic harp on the obverse. The pre-decimal coins of the Irish pound had realistic animals on the reverse; the decimal coins retained some of these but featured ornamental birds on the lower denominations; and the euro coins used the common design of the euro currencies. The pre-decimal and original decimal coins were of the same dimensions as the same-denomination British coins, as the Irish pound was in currency union with the British pound sterling. British coins were widely accepted in Ireland, and conversely to a lesser extent. In 1979 Ireland joined the Exchange Rate Mechanism and the Irish pound left parity with sterling; coin designs introduced after this differed between the two countries.

Australian fifty-cent coin Current denomination of Australian currency

The twelve-sided Australian fifty-cent coin is the third-highest denomination coin of the Australian dollar and the largest in terms of size in circulation. It is equal in size and shape to the Cook Island $5 coin, and both remain to be the only 12-sided coins in the southern hemisphere. It was introduced in 1969 to replace the round fifty-cent coin issued in 1966.

Australian twenty-cent coin Current denomination of Australian currency

The Australian twenty-cent coin (Quinter) of the Australian decimal currency system was issued with conversion to decimal currency on 14 February 1966, replacing the florin which was worth two shillings, a tenth of a pound.

Australian two-dollar coin Current denomination of Australian currency

The Australian two-dollar coin is the highest-denomination coin of the Australian dollar. It was first issued on 20 June 1988, having been in planning since the mid-1970s. It replaced the Australian two-dollar note due to having a longer circulatory life. The only "mint set only" year was 1991.

Coins of the Australian dollar were introduced on 14 February 1966, although they did not at that time include the one-dollar or two-dollar coins. The dollar was equivalent in value to 10 shillings in the former currency.

The coins of the New Zealand dollar are used for the smallest physical currency available in New Zealand. The current denominations are ten cents, twenty cents, fifty cents, one dollar and two dollars. The $1 and $2 coins are minted in a gold colour, the 20c and 50c coins are silver colour and the 10c coin is plated in copper.

Euro gold and silver commemorative coins

This article covers the gold and silver issues of the euro commemorative coins. It also includes some rare cases of bimetal collector coins.

One hundred pounds (British coin) Commemorative denomination of the pound sterling

The one hundred pound coin (£100) is a commemorative denomination of sterling coinage. Issued for the first time by the Royal Mint in 2015 and sold at face value, £100 coins hold legal tender status but are intended as collectors' items and are not found in general circulation. As of 1 November 2021, the silver content of each coin was worth about £35.

The fifty pound coin (£50) is a commemorative denomination of sterling coinage. Issued for the first time by the Royal Mint in 2015 and sold at face value, fifty pound coins hold legal tender status but are intended as collectors' items and are not found in general circulation. 100,000 coins will be produced in limited edition presentation.

References

  1. 1 2 Royal Mint creates first £20 coin, The Daily Telegraph, 5 September 2013
  2. £20 coin on its way - but expert says it's only worth £8, The Guardian, 5 September 2013
  3. Are £20 coins legal tender?, Royal Mint, 9 April 2014
  4. "The Royal Mint announces Welsh Dragon Silver £20 coin". Royal Mint.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. Five Pound Coin Designs and Specifications, Royal Mint
  6. "Legal Tender Guidelines | the Royal Mint".
  7. "How the Royal Mint is Attempting to Redefine "Legal Tender" for Collector Coins". 27 March 2016.