U.S. Olympic Festival

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The U.S. Olympic Festival was an amateur multi-sport event held in the United States by the United States Olympic Committee in the years between Olympic Games. Started in 1978 as an American counterpart to the communist Spartakiade – a similar event held on a quadrennial basis by the former Soviet Union and its former satellite in East Germany. As the competitive position of U.S. athletes in the Olympics slipped relative to that of the Soviets and East Germans, it was felt the U.S. needed some kind of multi-sports event to simulate the Olympic experience. [1] It was originally called the National Sports Festival and was the nation's largest amateur sporting event, before ending in 1995. [2]

A multi-sport event is an organized sporting event, often held over multiple days, featuring competition in many different sports among organized teams of athletes from (mostly) nation-states. The first major, modern, multi-sport event of international significance is the modern Olympic Games.

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References

  1. Hersh, Philip. "Olympic Festival's Success May Cause Its Demise". Chicago Tribune.
  2. Reid, Ron. "Olympic Festival Was A Big Hit In Oklahoma". philly.com.