U.S. Route 141

Last updated

US 141 (WI).svg

US Highway 141
U.S. Route 141
US 141 highlighted in red
Route information
Auxiliary route of US 41
Maintained by WisDOT and MDOT
Length168.82 mi [lower-alpha 1] (271.69 km)
ExistedNovember 11, 1926 (1926-11-11) [1] –present
Tourist
routes
Lake Michigan Circle Tour.svg Lake Michigan Circle Tour
Major junctions
South endI-43.svg I-43 near Bellevue, WI
 
North endUS 41.svgM-28.svg US 41 / M-28 near Covington, MI
Location
States Wisconsin, Michigan
CountiesWI: Brown, Oconto, Marinette; Florence
MI: Dickinson; Iron, Baraga
Highway system
WIS 140.svg WIS 140 WI WIS 142 WIS 142.svg
M-140 rectangle.svg M-140 MI M-142 M-142 rectangle.svg
M-100 rectangle.svg M-100 US 102 M-102 M-102 rectangle.svg

US Highway 141 (US 141) is a north–south United States Numbered Highway in the states of Wisconsin and Michigan. The highway runs north-northwesterly from an interchange with Interstate 43 (I-43) in Bellevue, Wisconsin, near Green Bay, to a junction with US 41/M-28 near Covington, Michigan. In between, it follows city streets in Green Bay and has a concurrent section with US 41 in Wisconsin. North of Green Bay, US 141 is either a freeway or an expressway into rural northern Wisconsin before downgrading to an undivided highway. In Michigan, US 141 is an undivided highway that runs through rural woodlands. The highway has two segments in each state; after running through Wisconsin for about 103 miles (166 km), it crosses into Michigan for approximately another eight miles (13 km). After that, it crosses back into Wisconsin for about 14 12 miles (23 km) before crossing the state line one last time. The northernmost Michigan section is about 43 12 miles (70 km), making the overall length about 169 miles (272 km).

Contents

When the US Highway System was formed on November 11, 1926, US 141 ran from Milwaukee to Green Bay, and one segment of the modern highway in Michigan was originally designated US Highway 102 (US 102). This other designation was decommissioned in 1928 when US 141 was extended north from Green Bay into Michigan. Michigan has rebuilt the highway in stages over the years to smooth out sharp curves in the routing. Since the 1960s, the section south of Green Bay has been converted into a freeway in segments. US 141 has ended southeast of Green Bay in Bellevue since the 1980s—the southern freeway segment was redesignated as I-43. The section north of Abrams, Wisconsin, was converted to a freeway in the opening years of the 21st century, with an additional divided-highway section opening a few years later.

Route description

As a bi-state highway, US 141 is a state trunk highway in Wisconsin and a state trunkline highway in Michigan. In Wisconsin, the segment through the Green Bay area is not on the National Highway System (NHS), [2] except for about four blocks along Broadway Avenue that is part of an intermodal connector with the Port of Green Bay. [3] The NHS is a network of roads important to the country's economy, defense, and mobility. [4] From the Green Bay suburb of Howard northward, including the entire length through Michigan, US 141 is a part of the NHS. [5] [6] From the I-43 interchange in Howard north to the split at Abrams, US 141 is also a part of the Lake Michigan Circle Tour (LMCT), a tourist route that surrounds Lake Michigan. [7]

Green Bay to Niagara

Ray Nitschke Memorial Bridge in Green Bay Ray Nitschke Memorial Bridge.jpg
Ray Nitschke Memorial Bridge in Green Bay

US 141 starts at an interchange with I-43 southeast of Green Bay in the suburb of Bellevue. From the terminus at exit 178, US 141 runs north to Main Street, and then northwesterly along Main Street through town. Wisconsin Highway 29 (WIS 29) merges with US 141 at an intersection on the northwest side of Bellevue, and the two highways run concurrently through residential subdivisions. Main Street passes over I-43 and continues to the north and into the city of Green Bay. US 141/WIS 29 crosses Baird Creek and runs along the banks of the East River. At the intersection with Monroe Avenue, WIS 29 turns south, joining WIS 54/WIS 57 while US 141 continues westward on Main Street to cross the Fox River on the Ray Nitschke Memorial Bridge. On the west side of the river, the highway follows Dousman Street for a block before turning north along Broadway Avenue for four blocks. From there, the highway follows Mather Street west to Velp Avenue. US 141 follows that street northwesterly and parallel to I-43 on the north side of Green Bay. This area is mostly residential with some businesses immediately on either side. In the suburb of Howard, US 141 merges onto the I-41/US 41 freeway via the interchange at exit 170. I-41/US 41/US 141 has an interchange for I-43 just south of the Duck Creek crossing, where I-41 terminates. [8] [9]

From Howard northward, the freeway runs through suburban Brown County to Suamico, parallel to a line of the Escanaba and Lake Superior Railroad (ELS), through a mixture of farm fields and residential subdivisions. There are frontage roads on both sides of the freeway to provide access to the properties immediately adjacent to US 41/US 141. There are a number of interchanges with county-maintained roads between Suamico and Abrams in Oconto County. At Abrams, US 141 splits from US 41 and heads northward while the latter freeway turns northeasterly. The landscape north of the split transitions to forest, and the freeway crosses the Oconto River in Stiles south of the interchange with WIS 22. The freeway bypasses Lena to the east and continues north through mixed farm fields and forest to the county line. North of the line, US 141 continues to the Marinette County communities of Coleman and Pound as an expressway. Through Coleman and Pound there is also a Business US 141. Past the latter town, US 141 transitions from expressway to a two-lane undivided highway. [7] [8]

Headed northward into Beecher, Wisconsin BeecherWisconsinSignUS141.jpg
Headed northward into Beecher, Wisconsin

South of Crivitz, US 141 crosses the Peshtigo River. The highway crosses a branch line of the ELS on the east side of Crivitz and continues north through woodland to the community of Middle Inlet. North of town, the roadway turns northeasterly to the community of Wausaukee where it intersects WIS 180. From there, the highway passes through the communities of Amberg and Beecher before coming into Pembine, where US 8 merges in from the west. The two highways run concurrently north and northeasterly to an intersection southeast of Niagara. US 8 separates to the east, and US 141 turns northwesterly along River Street into Niagara. The highway then turns north along Roosevelt Road and over the Menominee River to exit the state of Wisconsin. [7] [8]

Quinnesec northward

Once in Michigan, one mile (1.6 km) west of Quinnesec, US 141 meets and joins US 2. The two highways run concurrently westward into Iron Mountain along Stephenson Avenue, passing through a retail business corridor and into downtown. M-95 joins the two highways, and all three pass Lake Antoine. M-95 turns off north of town and US 2/US 141 crosses the Menominee River back into Wisconsin. [8] [10]

US 2/US 141 makes a 14.5-mile (23.3 km) run through Florence County, passing the Spread Eagle Chain of Lakes. The highway serves the communities of Spread Eagle and Florence. The only junction with another state trunk highway in Wisconsin on the northern section is with the concurrent highways WIS 70/WIS 101 in Florence. The highway crosses back into Michigan on a bridge over the Brule River south of Crystal Falls. [7] [8]

Northern terminus US141NorthernTerminusUS41M28.jpg
Northern terminus

Across the state line, the trunkline runs through forest near several smaller bodies of water such as Stager, Kennedy, and Railroad lakes. The highway enters Crystal Falls on 5th Street. US 2/US 141 runs along the top of the hill in town and intersects the western terminus of M-69 next to the Iron County Courthouse. US 141 continues westward on Crystal Avenue and separates from the US 2 concurrency on the western edge of town. Running north and northwesterly, US 141 passes to the east of the Ottawa National Forest through rural Iron County. The highway crosses the Paint River and continues through forest to the community of Amasa. The trunkline crosses the Hemlock River on the west side of town. From there, US 141 runs northward into the southwest corner of Baraga County and also enters the Eastern Time Zone. West of Worm Lake, US 141 meets M-28 in the community of Covington. The two highways merge and run easterly for about four miles (6.4 km) before US 141 terminates at US 41; M-28 continues eastward, merging with US 41. [8] [10]

History

Initial state highways

In 1918, when Wisconsin initially numbered its highway system, the route of what later became US 141 followed two separate state highways: WIS 17 from downtown Milwaukee to Manitowoc and WIS 16 from Manitowoc north to Green Bay. Segments that later became US 141 in Wisconsin were numbered WIS 15 between Green Bay and Abrams, and WIS 38 between Abrams and Wausaukee. North of Wausaukee, the future US Highway was an unnumbered secondary highway. [11] In 1919, Michigan signed its highway system, [12] but the state did not have a highway running south from Quinnesec to the state line. The highway from Quinnesec into Iron Mountain was part of M-12. [13] The segment through Florence County, Wisconsin, was WIS 69, [11] and from the Crystal Falls area north to Covington, the M-69 moniker was used. [13] In 1919, the WIS 38 designation was extended northward to Niagara and the state line. [14] [15] The highway was straightened to eliminate a series of sharp curves between Crivitz and Beaver in 1921. The same year, WIS 17 was realigned between Sheboygan and Cedar Grove to run via Oostburg. [16] [17] WIS 17 was also realigned in 1922 to follow a separate routing south of Port Washington; previously it was routed concurrently with WIS 57 in the area. [17] [18] By 1924, maps showed an unnumbered roadway running south from Quinnesec to connect with WIS 57 at the state line. [19]

Conversion to a US Highway

US 102 Michigan 1926.svg

US Highway 102
Location Crystal Falls, MICovington, MI
Length44.094 mi [20] (70.962 km)
ExistedNovember 11, 1926 [1]
c.September 20, 1928 [21]

As originally proposed in 1925, several US Highways in Wisconsin and Michigan's Upper Peninsula were to be designated. However, the routings for two highways were different in Michigan in 1925 than on the final 1926 map. In the original plan, US 102 was supposed to replace M-15 from US 2 at Rapid River, continue via Marquette to Humboldt, and the highway between Crystal Falls and Covington was not included in the system. [22] However, when the final plan was approved and implemented on November 11, 1926, [1] US 41 took the eastern routing through Rapid River and Marquette, and US 102 was routed between Crystal Falls and Covington. [23] In both plans, US 141 was only routed between Milwaukee and Green Bay, replacing WIS 17 and WIS 16. [22] [23] At the time the two US Highways were created, WIS 57 was left untouched between Abrams and Niagara. [24] The next year, the M-57 designation was assigned to connect WIS 57 to Quinnesec, and US 8 was extended to follow US 141 to US 2 near Iron Mountain. [25]

By September 20, 1928, the extension of US 141 northward from Green Bay along WIS 57 to the Michigan state line had been approved, [21] and the signage was readied for installation the following month. [26] The US 102 designation was decommissioned when US 141 was also extended to replace M-57 from the state line, along US 2 to Crystal Falls and north to Covington. [27] [28] US 8's eastern end was rerouted along a separate bridge over the Menominee River to a new terminus at an intersection with US 2 in Norway in 1929. [29] [30] US 141 was fully paved in Wisconsin in the early 1930s; the last segment to be completed was between Pound and Abrams. [31] [32]

The next major changes were made at the beginning of the 1930s in Michigan. A realignment in the Iron Mountain area shifted US 2/US 141 to a new bridge over the Menominee River between 1932 and 1934. [33] [34] In 1940, a new routing from the state line north to Crystal Falls was opened; the previous routing was returned to local control. [35] [36] The northern end was relocated near Covington in late 1948 or early 1949 when US 41 was realigned in the area. [37] [38] This terminus was shifted again when US 141/M-28 was realigned in the area in late 1955 or early 1956. [39] [40]

Freeway era

I-43 near Manitowoc, originally part of US 141 I43atU S 151Sign.jpg
I-43 near Manitowoc, originally part of US 141

At about the same time as the realignments in Michigan, two-lane bypasses of Manitowoc and Port Washington in Wisconsin were opened in 1957. [41] [42] The state built a divided-highway segment that opened the following year running from the Milwaukee area northward to the OzaukeeMilwaukee county line. [42] [43] The highway was rerouted to run further inland, bypassing Haven, Wisconsin, in 1959. [43] [44] In late 1961, the highway in Michigan was rebuilt in northern Iron and southern Baraga counties between Amasa and Covington as the state smoothed out sharp corners in the routing and finished paving US 141; [45] [46] a similar project was completed in 1972 south of Amasa to Crystal Falls. [47] [48]

Wisconsin proposed an addition to the Interstate Highway System in the 1950s to connect Green Bay, the state's third-largest city, to the system. Variations on this proposal included using either the US 41 or US 141 corridors, or a new corridor in between. This request was rejected in the 1950s, but it was approved in the 1960s. After approval, the state started the process to convert US 141 between Milwaukee and Abrams into a freeway. [49] The first segments of freeway were opened in the Milwaukee area, starting in 1963 between Locust Street and Good Hope Road. [50] [51] The following year, an extension of the freeway opened southward from Locust to North Avenue. [51] [52] By 1965, the bypass of Sheboygan was opened; [49] the Milwaukee area freeway was extended northward to Brown Deer Road the following year. [53] [54] Another freeway segment in the Milwaukee area opened in 1967, extending northward to Grafton in Ozaukee County. [55] [56] The last section of US 141 in the city of Milwaukee to open as a freeway was completed in 1968 when I-94 was finished through downtown; at the same time, US 141 was extended southward from North Avenue to meet I-94. [57] [58]

Northbound approaching the US 41/US 141 split at Abrams Junction of US 41 and US 141.jpg
Northbound approaching the US 41/US 141 split at Abrams

Another freeway section from north of Green Bay to Suamico was opened in 1971. [59] [60] In 1972, the divided-highway segment between Suamico and Abrams opened, [60] [61] and the state started the construction of additional freeways between Green Bay and Milwaukee. [49] The bypasses of Sheboygan and Cedar Grove were converted to full freeways in 1973. [61] [62] Another segment of freeway opened in 1975 that bypassed Port Washington and connected the freeway sections that ended near Grafton and Cedar Grove. [63] [64] I-43 was first designated on the 1978 official state highway map along US 141 from Milwaukee to Sheboygan; missing segments of I-43 between Green Bay and Milwaukee are shown as either under construction or proposed. [65] In November of that year, the nine-mile (14 km) section bypassing Maribel opened. [66] In October 1980, the 33-mile (53 km) segment of freeway between Sheboygan and Denmark opened. [67] At the same time, the northern bypass of Green Bay was under construction and I-43/US 141 was open from Maribel to Branch northwest of Manitowoc; US 141 was truncated to end at the northern end of the Sheboygan bypass. [68] I-43 was initially completed in 1981, [49] and the southern terminus of US 141 was moved again, truncating the highway to end in Bellevue by 1983. [69]

In 1986, the states in the Great Lakes region created the LMCT as part of a larger program of tourist routes in the region; [70] US 141 carries the LMCT between the northern I-43 junction in the Green Bay area north to the split with US 41 at Abrams. [7] In the first years of the 21st century, US 141 was expanded to a four-lane expressway northward from Abrams to Oconto Falls. [71] [72] A further upgrade in 2006 expanded the highway to four-lanes northward to Beaver. [73] [74] On April 7, 2015, the segment of US 141 that runs concurrently with US 41 on the west side of Green Bay was designated a part of I-41 by the Federal Highway Administration. [75]

Major intersections

StateCountyLocationmi [lower-alpha 2] kmExitDestinationsNotes
Wisconsin Brown Town of Ledgeview 0.000.00I-43.svg I-43  Milwaukee, Green Bay
WIS County MM.svg CTH-MM (Elm View Road)
Exit 178 on I-43; roadway continues southward as CTH-MM
0.811.30WIS 29.svg WIS 29 east Kewaunee Eastern end of WIS 29 concurrency
Green Bay 7.7212.42WIS 29.svgWIS 54.svgWIS 57.svg WIS 29 west / WIS 54 / WIS 57  Algoma, Sturgeon Bay, Shawano Western end of WIS 29 concurrency
Howard 11.0617.80Military AvenueFormer Bus. US 41
12.0119.33170AI-41.svgUS 41 (WI).svg I-41 south / US 41 south Appleton
WIS County HS.svg CTH-HS (Velp Avenue north)
Southern end of I-41/US 41 concurrency; exit numbers follow US 41's mileage
12.3919.94170BI-41.svg I-41 south
I-43.svgLake Michigan Circle Tour.svg I-43 south / LMCT south Milwaukee
Northern end of I-41 concurrency; southern end of LMCT concurrency; northern termini of I-41 and I-43; I-43 exit 192
Suamico 14.4523.26173WIS County M.svg CTH-M (Lineville Road)
17.5028.16176WIS County B.svg CTH-B (Sunset Beach Road)
Oconto Town of Little Suamico 20.4832.96179Brown Road
23.4937.80182WIS County S.svg CTH-S
Town of Abrams 26.5342.70185WIS County D.svg CTH-D (Sampson Road)
28.1245.25187US 41 (WI).svgLake Michigan Circle Tour.svg US 41 north / LMCT north Oconto, Marinette Interchange; left exit and entrance southbound; northern end of US 41/LMCT concurrency
Town of Stiles 35.1256.52WIS 22.svg WIS 22  Oconto Falls, Gillett, Oconto Diamond interchange
Town of Lena 39.7063.89WIS County A.svg CTH-A Lena Diamond interchange
OcontoMarinette
county line
LenaPound
town line
44.8372.15Northern end of freeway; southern end of expressway
Marinette Coleman 47.4376.33Business plate.svgNo image wide.svg
US 141 (WI).svgWIS County B.svg Bus. US 141 / CTH-B Coleman, Pound
Diamond interchange; Bus. US 141 only signed northbound
Town of Beaver 51.7283.24No image wide.svgBusiness plate.svg
WIS 64.svgUS 141 (WI).svg WIS 64 / Bus. US 141  Marinette, Pound, Antigo
Diamond interchange; Bus. US 141 only signed southbound
53.1085.46Northern end of expressway
Crivitz 60.5897.49WIS County A.svgWIS County W.svg CTH-A north / CTH-W Athelstane Former western terminus for WIS 158
Wausaukee 70.41113.31WIS 180.svg WIS 180 south Marinette
Town of Pembine 88.76142.85US 8 (WI).svg US 8 west Goodman, Rhinelander Southern end of US 8 concurrency
Town of Niagara 98.28158.17US 8.svg US 8 east Norway Northern end of US 8 concurrency
Menominee River 102.87
0.000
165.55
0.000
State line
Michigan Dickinson Breitung Township 1.1321.822US 2.svg US 2 east Escanaba Eastern end of US 2 concurrency
Iron Mountain 3.6205.826M-95.svg M-95 south Kingsford Southern end of M-95 concurrency
Breitung Township 7.22711.631M-95.svg M-95 north Sagola, Republic, Marquette Northern end of M-95 concurrency
Menominee River 7.892
0.00
12.701
0.00
State line
Wisconsin Florence Town of Florence 3.916.29WIS 70.svgWIS 101.svg WIS 70 west / WIS 101 south Eagle River, Armstrong Creek
Brule River 14.46
0.000
23.27
0.000
State line
Michigan Iron Crystal Falls 10.03016.142M-69.svg M-69 east Sagola Western terminus of M-69
Crystal Falls Township 11.18618.002US 2.svg US 2 west Iron River, Ironwood Northern end of US 2 concurrency
Baraga Covington 39.44863.485M-28.svg M-28 west Wakefield Western end of M-28 concurrency
Covington Township 43.60270.171US 41.svgM-28.svgLake Superior Circle Tour.svg US 41 / M-28 east / LSCT  Baraga, Houghton, Marquette Eastern end of M-28 concurrency
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Business route

Business plate.svg

US 141 (WI).svg

BusinessUS Highway 141
Location ColemanPound
Length4.5 mi [78] (7.2 km)
Existed2006 [73] [74] –present

Business U.S. Highway 141 (Bus. US 141) is a business loop of US 141 that runs through the communities of Coleman and Pound. The loop follows County Trunk Highway B (CTH-B) northeasterly from the US 141 expressway into downtown Coleman and then turns northward near Coleman High School. Bus. US 141 continues northward into Pound, crossing the Peshtigo River in between the two communities. North of Pound, the loop crosses over US 141 on 21st Road and continues to an intersection with WIS 64. The business loop follows WIS 64 back to an interchange on US 141 northwest of Pound where the loop terminates. [78]

In 2006, the US 141 expressway was extended northward near Beaver, and the former route of US 141, plus a connector roadway southwest of downtown Coleman was designated as a business loop. [73] [74] This route does not appear on the official Wisconsin Department of Transportation maps, so it is a locally designated business loop under local maintenance. [7]

See also

Notes

  1. Total mileage is a summation of the state mileages.
  2. Mileage numbers reset at the Michigan–Wisconsin state line crossings. [20] [76] [77]

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There are currently four business routes of Interstate 69 (I-69) in the US state of Michigan. Designated Business Loop Interstate 69, they are all former routings of I-69's predecessor highways, US Highway 27 (US 27), M-78 or M-21, in whole or in part. The BL I-69 in Coldwater and the one in Charlotte were both parts of US 27 before the freeway bypassed those two cities in 1967 and the early 1970s, respectively. The BL I-69 through Lansing and East Lansing was previously part of M-78 and Temporary I-69 until it was redesignated in 1987. Before 1984, the loop in Port Huron was originally part of M-21 and was initially a business spur numbered Business Spur Interstate 69. It was later redesignated when it was extended to run concurrently with that city's BL I-94 which was originally part of I-94's predecessor, US 25. Each business loop follows streets through each city's downtown areas and connects to I-69 on both ends, giving traffic a route through the downtown and back to the freeway.

There have been six business routes of Interstate 96 (I-96) in the US state of Michigan. There are two business loops designated Business Loop Interstate 96 : one through Lansing and one through Howell. Both follow the old route of US Highway 16 (US 16), with appropriate connections to I-96. There are three former business spurs that were designated Business Spur Interstate 96. One connected to the carferry docks in Muskegon, running concurrently with part of Business US 31 along former US 16, but it has been eliminated. The second spur ran into downtown Portland until it was decommissioned in 2007. Two routes in the Detroit area—a loop through Farmington and a spur into Detroit—both using Grand River Avenue, and meeting at the temporary end of I-96 near Purdue Avenue, were eliminated when I-96 was moved to the completed Jeffries Freeway in 1977. The Farmington business route is still state-maintained as an unsigned highway, while the Detroit business route remained unsigned until it was decommissioned in 2016 and replaced by an extension of M-5.

There have been nine business routes for Interstate 75 in the US state of Michigan. Numbered either Business Loop Interstate 75 or Business Spur Interstate 75 depending if they are a full business loop or a business spur, these highways are former routings of I-75's predecessor highways in the state. They were designated as I-75 was completed through the various areas of Michigan. The business loop in Pontiac runs through that city's downtown along a section of Woodward Avenue and a segment of roadway formerly used by M-24. The former Saginaw business loop was once a part of US Highway 23 (US 23), as was most of the original Bay City business loop. The roadways that make up the business loops in West Branch and Roscommon were previously part of M-76, I-75's predecessor through that part of the state. In Northern Michigan, the Grayling and Gaylord BL I-75s were part of US 27, and the two business routes in St. Ignace and Sault Ste. Marie in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan were part of US 2. A tenth business route, a loop through Indian River has been proposed. Each of the business loops connects to I-75 on both ends and runs through their respective cities' downtown areas. The two business spurs only connect to I-75 on one end and run into the appropriate downtown.

US Highway 127 (US 127) is a part of the United States Numbered Highway System that runs from Chattanooga, Tennessee, to the Lower Peninsula of Michigan. In Michigan, it is a state trunkline highway that runs for 214.17 miles (344.67 km), entering from Ohio south of Hudson and ending at a partial interchange with Interstate 75 (I-75) south of Grayling. US 127 is the primary route connecting Lansing and Central Michigan to Northern Michigan and the Mackinac Bridge. From the south side of Jackson northerly, it is mostly a four-lane freeway. A notable exception is a 16-mile (26 km) stretch from north of St. Johns to just south of Ithaca, where the highway is built as an expressway and speed limits are lower. South of Jackson to the state line, the trunkline is a two-lane, undivided highway with access from adjacent properties.

US Highway 25 (US 25) was a part of the United States Numbered Highway System in the state of Michigan that ran from the Ohio state line near Toledo and ended at the tip of The Thumb in Port Austin. The general routing of this state trunkline highway took it northeasterly from the state line through Monroe and Detroit to Port Huron. Along this southern half, it followed undivided highways and ran concurrently along two freeways, Interstate 75 (I-75) and I-94. Near the foot of the Blue Water Bridge in Port Huron, US 25 turned north and northwesterly along the Lake Huron shoreline to Port Austin.

M-56 was a state trunkline highway in the southeastern part of the US state of Michigan. It existed from 1919 until 1957. The highway ran north from Monroe, where it connected with US Highway 24, to Flat Rock where it terminated at an intersection with US 24/US 25. Before a series of truncations in the 1950s, the highway continued along the Huron River to New Boston and Belleville. The trunkline was progressively scaled back to Flat Rock before being decommissioned in 1957.

There have been five different business routes of US Highway 23 in the state of Michigan. These business routes were designated along former sections of US Highway 23 (US 23) to provide signed access from the main highway to the downtowns of cities bypassed by new routings of US 23. Two are still extant, connecting through downtown Ann Arbor and Rogers City. Three others have been decommissioned. The former Business US 23 in Fenton was split in half during the 1970s and later completely turned back to local control in 2006. The former business loops through Saginaw and Bay City were renumbered as business loops of Interstate 75 in the 1960s.

References

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