UEFA Women's Euro 2013 Final

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UEFA Women's Euro 2013 Final
Swedbank Arena 1.jpg
Event UEFA Women's Euro 2013
Date28 July 2013
Venue Friends Arena, Solna, Sweden
Player of the Match Nadine Angerer (Germany) [1]
Referee Cristina Dorcioman (Romania)
Attendance41,301
WeatherScattered clouds
25 °C (77 °F) [2]
2009
2017

The UEFA Women's Euro 2013 Final was an association football match on 28 July 2013 at the Friends Arena in Solna, Sweden, to determine the winner of UEFA Women's Euro 2013. The match was won by the defending champions Germany, who earned their sixth consecutive European title – and eighth in total – with a 1–0 win over Norway.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Friends Arena Association football stadium in Solna, Sweden

Friends Arena, also known as Nationalarenan, is a retractable roof multi-purpose stadium in Stockholm, Sweden. Located next to the lake Råstasjön in Solna, just north of the City Centre, it is the biggest stadium in Scandinavia. Since its opening, the venue has served as Sweden's national stadium for men's football, hence its name. The main tenants of the stadium are Sweden's men's national football team and Allsvenskan football club AIK; both relocated from their previous home at the Råsunda Stadium. The venue has a total capacity of 65,000 at concerts and 50,000 seated at football matches, but the stadium can be scaled down to provide for smaller events with approximately 20,000 guests. If the city of Stockholm's bid with Åre, Falun and Sigulda, Latvia for the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games is successful, this arena would host the opening ceremony.

Solna Municipality Municipality in Stockholm County, Sweden

Solna Municipality is a municipality in Stockholm County in Sweden, located just north of the Stockholm City Centre. Its seat is located in the town of Solna, which is a part of the Stockholm urban area.

Contents

The match took place in front of a record crowd for a Women's European Championship fixture as 41,301 spectators saw Anja Mittag score the only goal of the game in the 49th minute. Norway were awarded two penalties during the match but both were saved by German goalkeeper Nadine Angerer. [1]

Anja Mittag German female footballer

Anja Mittag is a German footballer who plays for FC Rosengård as a striker.

Nadine Angerer German footballer

Nadine Marejke Angerer is a retired German footballer who played as a goalkeeper. She played for Frauen-Bundesliga clubs Bayern Munich, Turbine Potsdam and FFC Frankfurt. In 2008, she played for Djurgårdens IF of the Swedish Damallsvenskan and she spent two periods on loan with Brisbane Roar of the Australian W-League in 2013 and 2014, before finishing her career with Portland Thorns FC of the American National Women's Soccer League (NWSL). During her extensive international career, Angerer was recognised as one of the world's best female goalkeepers.

Background

Germany had previously won the competition a record seven times (including one title as West Germany) and had won six of the seven tournaments staged under its current title and status (in 1991, 1995, 1997, 2001, 2005 and 2009). Three of their seven titles had come after defeating Norway in the final. [3] Despite losing three finals, Norway had twice previously managed to win the competition: in 1987 under its original title of the UEFA European Competition for Representative Women's Teams, and in 1993; the only time since the competition was given European Championship status by UEFA that Germany did not win the competition. [4] With this unparalleled record in European women's football, Germany had begun the tournament as the number one ranked team, with Norway ranked fifth in UEFA's coefficient ranking before the competition. [5]

The 1991 UEFA Women's Championship took place in Denmark. It was won by Germany in a final against Norway in a repeat of the previous edition's final. Eighteen teams entered qualifying, which was enough to make the competition the first fully official one, so the name was changed to the UEFA Women's Championship.

The 1995 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1995 was a football tournament that happened between 1993 and 1995. The final game was held in Germany. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

The 1997 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1997 was a football tournament held in 1997 in Norway and Sweden. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

The two teams had already met during the finals just eleven days earlier. In their final game of the group stage, Norway became the first team to defeat Germany in any form of UEFA Women's Euros fixture since they lost a qualifying match in May 1996, again against the Norwegians. [6] [4] Prior to the final, the two sides had previously met each other a total of 36 times, with Germany winning 17 and Norway 14. [4] The 2013 Final was the fourth time that the two teams had met in the competition's final. [4]

Route to the final

Both teams began the tournament in Group B and achieved qualification for the knockout stage by gaining four points from their first two fixtures (both facing Iceland and the Netherlands, respectively). [7] Although Germany led the group going into their final group matchday meeting on goal difference, [7] Norway were able to defeat the Germans 1–0 through an Ingvild Isaksen goal to top the group and face Group C runner-up Spain in the quarter-final round. [6]

Group B of the UEFA Women's Euro 2013 consisted of Germany, the reigning champions, Iceland, Netherlands and Norway. Matches were staged in Kalmar and Växjö from 11–17 July 2013.

Iceland womens national football team womens national association football team representing Iceland

The Iceland women's national football team represents Iceland in international women's football. It is currently ranked as the 19th best national team in the world by FIFA as of June 2018. On October 30, 2008, the national team qualified to the 2009 UEFA Women's Championship, the first major football tournament Iceland take part in, having previously competed in the 1995 UEFA Women's Championship which was a home and away knockout competition. At the 2013 UEFA Women's Championship they've taken their first point in a major championship, following a draw against Norway in the opening game.

Netherlands womens national football team Womens national association football team representing the Netherlands

The Netherlands women's national football team is directed by the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB), which is a member of UEFA and FIFA.

Norway comfortably beat the Spanish team in a game that saw them three goals ahead by the 65th minute, eventually progressing as 3–1 victors. [8] In their semi-final against Denmark, the Norwegians took a third-minute lead but their advantage was eventually cancelled out three minutes from full-time to send the game into extra time. After no further additions to the 1–1 scoreline, Norway successfully converted all four of their penalty kicks to win the shootout 4–2. [9] Germany advanced through the knockout stage with two successive 1–0 wins, which firstly eliminated Italy, [10] then the host nation Sweden in two tightly-contested matches. [11]

Denmark womens national football team womens national association football team representing Denmark

The Denmark women's national football team represents Denmark in international women's football. The team is controlled by the Danish Football Association (DBU).

Italy womens national football team womens national association football team representing Italy

The Italy women's national football team represents Italy in international women's football at the senior level. The team is governed by the Italian Football Federation.

The Sweden women's national football team represents Sweden in international women's football competition and is controlled by the Swedish Football Association. The national team has won the European Competition for Women's Football in 1984, one World Cup-silver (2003), as well as three European Championship-silvers. The team has participated in six Olympic Games, seven World Cups, as well as nine European Championships. Sweden won the bronze medal at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

GermanyRoundNorway
OpponentResult Group stage OpponentResult
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 0–0 Match 1Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 1–1
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 3–0 Match 2Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 1–0
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 0–1 Match 3Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 1–0
TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 321031+27
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 311131+24
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 31112424
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 30120221
Source: [ citation needed ]
Final standing
TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 321031+27
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 311131+24
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 31112424
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 30120221
Source: [ citation needed ]
OpponentResult Knockout stage OpponentResult
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 1–0 Quarter-finalFlag of Spain.svg  Spain 3–1
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1–0 Semi-finalFlag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 1–1 (aet) (4–2 pen.)

Match

Team selection

Neither team had any suspensions; indeed no red cards were shown during the entire tournament. In Germany's only change to their starting XI in their semi-final victory, Célia Okoyino da Mbabi, who had scored a record 19 goals during the overall qualification campaign and final tournament but had suffered a hamstring injury during their quarter-final win, was now fit enough to start. She replaced Anja Mittag, who had been pushed forward from her usual midfield role to cover Okoyino da Mbabi, as the main forward.

Despite having played 120 minutes in their semi-final three days earlier, Norway had no injury concerns ahead of the match. Coach Even Pellerud opted to make one change from their previous game as Cathrine Dekkerhus was selected ahead of Ingvild Isaksen in central midfield.

Summary

In the opening moments a German free-kick from the right was met by a looping header from Nadine Keßler which Ingrid Hjelmseth in the Norwegian goal managed to keep out from underneath the crossbar. [1] The opening half-hour brought several other opportunities for Germany, but Norway received the best chance to take the lead when Okoyino da Mbabi was adjudged to have brought down Cathrine Dekkerhus in the area and a penalty kick was awarded in the 29th minute. Trine Bjerke Rønning struck the ball powerfully but centrally and the German captain Nadine Angerer blocked it with her outstretched leg. [1]

Nadine Angerer saved two penalties by Norway. 2011-08 Nadine Angerer.JPG
Nadine Angerer saved two penalties by Norway.

The deadlock was broken four minutes into the second-half when Okoyino da Mbabi's fast run along the left drew the attentions of the Norwegian defence. [1] She was therefore able to square the ball into the centre of the penalty area, where an unmarked Anja Mittag – a half-time replacement for Lena Lotzen – was awaiting to side-foot the ball into the net from close range. [1]

Germany then had further chances to increase their lead as two efforts from Okoyino da Mbabi had to be blocked on the goal-line by Norway. [1] However, on the hour mark, Norway received a second penalty when Saskia Bartusiak fouled Caroline Graham Hansen. [1] After Rønning's earlier miss, Solveig Gulbrandsen was instead chosen to take the kick but it was again saved by Angerer as she leapt to her left. [1]

Norway did finally have the ball in the net four minutes later when Ada Hegerberg turned Maren Mjelde's drilled cross in, but it was ruled out for offside. [1] In the 72nd minute the Norwegian substitute Elise Thorsnes beat Angerer to a lofted through-ball but poked it narrowly wide. [1] Eight minutes from time, Germany almost sealed victory when Leonie Maier crossed dangerously for Nadine Keßler to shoot, but her effort was scuffed and clipped the post. [1] However, the single-goal advantage proved sufficient as the time ran out on Norway's attempts to win an equaliser.

Details

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg1–0Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Mittag Soccerball shade.svg 49' Report
Friends Arena, Solna
Attendance: 41,301
Referee: Cristina Dorcioman (Romania) [12]
Kit left arm ger13a.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body ger13a.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm ger13a.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts ger13a.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks ger13a.png
Kit socks long.svg
Germany [13]
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body Norway12Home.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks nor13a wom.png
Kit socks long.svg
Norway [13]
Flag of Germany.svg
GERMANY:
GK1 Nadine Angerer (c)
RB4 Leonie Maier
CB5 Annike Krahn Yellow card.svg 70'
CB3 Saskia Bartusiak
LB15 Jennifer Cramer
DM8 Nadine Keßler
CM20 Lena Goeßling
RW9 Lena Lotzen Sub off.svg 46'
AM10 Dzsenifer Marozsán
LW6 Simone Laudehr Sub off.svg 77'
CF13 Célia Okoyino da Mbabi
Substitutions:
FW11 Anja Mittag Sub on.svg 46'
DF2 Bianca Schmidt Sub on.svg 77'
Manager:
Silvia Neid
GER-NOR-2013-07-28.svg
Flag of Norway.svg
NORWAY:
GK1 Ingrid Hjelmseth
RB6 Maren Mjelde
CB7 Trine Bjerke Rønning
CB3 Marit Fiane Christensen Sub off.svg 85'
LB5 Toril Hetland Akerhaugen
DM4 Ingvild Stensland (c)Sub off.svg 76'
CM8 Solveig Gulbrandsen Sub off.svg 68'
DM22 Cathrine Dekkerhus
RW10 Caroline Graham Hansen
LW16 Kristine Wigdahl Hegland
CF21 Ada Hegerberg
Substitutions:
FW9 Elise Thorsnes Sub on.svg 68'
MF19 Ingvild Isaksen Sub on.svg 76'
FW11 Leni Larsen Kaurin Sub on.svg 85'
Manager:
Even Pellerud

Player of the Match:
Nadine Angerer (Germany) [1]

Assistant referees: [12]
Maria Villa Gutiérrez (Spain)
Sian Massey (England)
Fourth official: [12]
Kirsi Heikkinen (Finland)

Match rules [14]

Statistics

Statistic [15] GermanyNorway
Goals scored10
Total shots239
Shots on target113
Corner kicks66
Fouls committed1213
Offsides21
Yellow cards10
Red cards00

Post match

After the match, the trophy was handed to the German captain and Player of the Match Award winner Nadine Angerer by UEFA president Michel Platini. The German squad celebrated at their team hotel in Solna before returning home to a public reception at Frankfurt's town hall. Here, they were greeted by a crowd outside the building in excess of 7,000. [16]

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References

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  2. "Weather history for Stockholm Bromma, Sweden". Wunderground.com. 28 July 2013.
  3. "Germany hold edge in Norway finals". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 26 June 2013.
  4. 1 2 3 4 "Norway aim to end Germany final jinx". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 26 June 2013.
  5. "UEFA Women's National Team Coefficient Ranking" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  6. 1 2 "Germany fall to a first defeat in 17 years". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 17 June 2013.
  7. 1 2 "'Hunted' Germany relaxed for Norway test". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 16 June 2013.
  8. "Norway ease past Spain into semi-finals". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 22 June 2013.
  9. "Norway defeat Denmark on penalties to reach final". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 25 June 2013.
  10. "Germany through as Laudehr sinks Italy". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 21 June 2013.
  11. "Marozsán fires Germany past Sweden into final". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 24 June 2013.
  12. 1 2 3 "Dorcioman appointed to referee final". UEFA . uefa.com. 26 July 2013.
  13. 1 2 "Tactical Line-up – Germany-Norway" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 28 July 2013. Retrieved 28 July 2013.
  14. "Regulations of the UEFA European Women's Football Championship 2011–13" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. p. 21.
  15. "Germany-Norway statistics". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 28 July 2013. Retrieved 28 July 2013.
  16. "Triumphant Germany return to heroes' welcome". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 30 July 2013. Retrieved 30 July 2013.