UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship

Last updated
UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship
UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship logo.png
Founded2007
Region Europe (UEFA)
Number of teamsMaximum of 54 (qualifying round)
24 (elite round)
8 (finals)
Current championsFlag of Spain.svg  Spain (4th title)
Most successful team(s)Flag of Germany.svg  Germany (6 titles)
Soccerball current event.svg 2019 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship qualification

The UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship is a European championship football tournament, organized by UEFA, for national teams of women under age seventeen. The tournament was first played out in 2007–08, having been approved by the UEFA Executive Committee on 22 May 2006. It is also a FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup qualifying competition in even years. National under-17 teams whose countries belong to the European governing body UEFA can register to enter the competition. [1] Germany is the most successful team in this competition, having won six titles. Spain are the current champions.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

UEFA international sport governing body

The Union of European Football Associations is the administrative body for association football, futsal and beach soccer in Europe, although several member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia. It is one of six continental confederations of world football's governing body FIFA. UEFA consists of 55 national association members.

The FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup is an international association football tournament for female players under the age of 17. It is organized by Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA). The tournament is held in even-numbered years, starting in 2008.

Contents

Format

After two qualifying rounds, open to all eligible nations, four teams qualify for the final stage. They face in the semi-finals, with the winners contesting the final.

In 2011 it was announced, that the tournament will be expanded to eight teams [2] and beginning with the 2014 edition the eight qualified teams play round-robin in two groups of four.

Results

Finals so far. [3]

YearHostFinalThird place match
ChampionScoreSecond placeThird placeScoreFourth place
2008
Details
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
3 – 0Flag of France.svg
France
Flag of Denmark.svg
Denmark
4 – 1Flag of England.svg
England
2009
Details
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
7 – 0Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
Flag of France.svg
France
3 – 1Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
2010
Details
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
0 – 0
(4 – 1 pen.)
Flag of Ireland.svg
Republic of Ireland
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
3 – 0Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
2011
Details
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
1 – 0Flag of France.svg
France
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
8 – 2Flag of Iceland.svg
Iceland
2012
Details
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
1 – 1
(4 – 3 pen.)
Flag of France.svg
France
Flag of Denmark.svg
Denmark
0 – 0
(5 – 4 pen.)
Flag of Switzerland.svg
Switzerland
2013
Details
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Flag of Poland.svg
Poland
1 – 0Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
4 – 0Flag of Belgium (civil).svg
Belgium
YearHostFinalThird place match
(or losing semifinalists if third place match not played) [lower-alpha 1]
ChampionScoreSecond placeThird placeScoreFourth place
2014
Details
Flag of England.svg  England Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
1 – 1
(3 – 1 pen.)
Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
Flag of Italy.svg
Italy
0 – 0
(4 – 3 pen.)
Flag of England.svg
England
2015
Details
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
5 – 2Flag of Switzerland.svg
Switzerland
Flag of France.svg  France and Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2016
Details
Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
0 – 0
(3 – 2 pen.)
Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
Flag of England.svg
England
2 – 1Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
2017
Details
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
0 – 0
(3 – 1 pen.)
Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands and Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
2018
Details
Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
2 – 0Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
2 – 1Flag of England.svg
England
2019
Details
Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria
2020
Details
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden

Winners

As 2018

CountryWinnersRunners-upThird-placeFourth-placeLosing semifinalistsTotal (Top Four)
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 6 (2008, 2009, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2017)1 (2018)2 (2010, 2011)1 (2015)10
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 4 (2010, 2011, 2015, 2018)4 (2009, 2014, 2016, 2017)1 (2013)9
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 1 (2013)1
Flag of France.svg  France 3 (2008, 2011, 2012)1 (2009)1 (2015)5
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 1 (2015)1 (2012)2
Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 1 (2010)1
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1 (2013)1
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 2 (2008, 2012)2
Flag of England.svg  England 1 (2016)3 (2008, 2014, 2018)4
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 1 (2014)1
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 1 (2018)1
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 2 (2009, 2016)1 (2017)3
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 1 (2010)1 (2017)2
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 1 (2011)1
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 1 (2013)1
Total111199444

Comprehensive team results by tournament

Legend

For each tournament, the number of teams in each finals tournament (in brackets) are shown.

Team 2008
Flag of Switzerland.svg
(4)
2009
Flag of Switzerland.svg
(4)
2010
Flag of Switzerland.svg
(4)
2011
Flag of Switzerland.svg
(4)
2012
Flag of Switzerland.svg
(4)
2013
Flag of Switzerland.svg
(4)
2014
Flag of England.svg
(8)
2015
Flag of Iceland.svg
(8)
2016
Flag of Belarus.svg
(8)
2017
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
(8)
2018
Flag of Lithuania.svg
(8)
2019
Flag of Bulgaria.svg
(8)
2020
Flag of Sweden.svg
(8)
Total
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria ××GS1
Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus GS1
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 4th1
Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria q1
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic GSGS2
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 3rd3rd2
Flag of England.svg  England 4th4thGS3rdGS4th6
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 3rd1
Flag of France.svg  France 2nd3rd2nd2ndGS3rdGS7
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 1st1st3rd3rd1st1st3rd1st1st2nd10
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 3rdGSGS3
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 4thGS2
Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania GS1
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 4th3rdGS3
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 4thGS4th3rd4
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 1stGS2
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal ××××××GS1
Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 2ndGSGS3
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland GS1
Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia ×GS1
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 2nd1st1st3rd2nd1st2nd2nd1st9
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 2ndq2
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 4th2nd2

In 2015 and 2017, the 3rd-4th places match was not played.

Golden Player by tournament

Since the 2008 edition, the Golden Player Award has been given to the most valuable player of the tournament. [4]

YearPlayer
2008 Flag of Germany.svg Alexandra Popp
2009 Flag of Germany.svg Kyra Malinowski
2010 Flag of Spain.svg Dolores Gallardo
2011 Flag of Spain.svg Alba Pomares
2012 Flag of France.svg Sandie Toletti
2013 Flag of Poland.svg Ewa Pajor
2014 Flag of Spain.svg Andrea Falcón
2015 Flag of Germany.svg Stefanie Sanders
2016 Flag of Germany.svg Caroline Siems
2017 Flag of Germany.svg Lena Oberdorf

Number of teams

Year of tournamentNumber of teamsFormat
2008–20134Semifinals, third place play-off and final
2014–present8Two groups of four team, semifinals, third place play-off (in even years only, for qualifying to FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup) and final

See also

FIFA Womens World Cup international association football competition

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

The FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup is an international association football tournament, organized by FIFA, for national teams of women under the age of 20. The tournament is held in even-numbered years. It was first conducted in 2002 as the FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship with an upper age limit of 19. In 2006, the age limit was raised to the current 20. The event was renamed as a World Cup effective with the 2008 competition, making its name consistent with FIFA's other worldwide competitions for national teams.

UEFA Womens Under-19 Championship U19-womens national team association football tournament

The UEFA European Women's Under-19 Championship is a competition in women's football for European national teams of players under 19 years of age. National under-19 teams whose countries belong to the European governing body UEFA can register to enter the competition.

Notes

  1. Since expansion to eight teams in 2014, the third place match is only played for even-numbered years when used to decide the third UEFA qualifier for the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup. For odd-numbered years, the losing semifinalists are listed in alphabetical order.

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References

  1. "UEFA European Women's U-17 C'ship". uefa.com. Retrieved 2007-07-19.
  2. "Women's EURO and U17s expanded". UEFA. 8 December 2011. Retrieved 8 December 2011.
  3. "European Women's Under-17 Championship". RSSSF. Retrieved 27 March 2014.
  4. History