USS Heed (AM-100)

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History
US flag 48 stars.svgUnited States
Name: USS Heed (AM-100)
Builder: General Engineering & Dry Dock Company, Alameda, California
Launched: 19 June 1942
Commissioned: 27 February 1943
Decommissioned: 15 January 1947
Recommissioned: 5 March 1952
Decommissioned: 27 January 1954
Reclassified: MSF-100, 7 February 1955
Struck: 1 March 1967
Honours and
awards:
5 battle stars (World War II)
General characteristics
Class and type: Auk-classminesweeper
Displacement: 890 long tons (904 t)
Length: 220 ft 3 in (67.13 m)
Beam: 32 ft 2 in (9.80 m)
Draft: 10 ft 9 in (3.28 m)
Speed: 18 knots (33 km/h; 21 mph)
Complement: 100 officers and enlisted
Armament:

USS Heed (AM-100) was an Auk-class minesweeper built for the United States Navy during World War II. She earned five battle stars for her World War II service. She was recommissioned during the Korean War. She was placed in reserve in 1954 and remained there until struck from the Naval Vessel Register in 1967.

<i>Auk</i>-class minesweeper 1942 class of minesweepers of the United States Navy

The Auk class were Allied minesweepers serving with the United States Navy and the British Royal Navy during the Second World War. In total, there were 95 Auks built.

Minesweeper Vessel for removing naval mines

A minesweeper is a small naval warship designed to engage in minesweeping. Using various mechanisms intended to counter the threat posed by naval mines, waterways are kept clear for safe shipping.

United States Navy Naval warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Navy (USN) is the naval warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States. It is the largest and most capable navy in the world and it has been estimated that in terms of tonnage of its active battle fleet alone, it is larger than the next 13 navies combined, which includes 11 U.S. allies or partner nations. with the highest combined battle fleet tonnage and the world's largest aircraft carrier fleet, with eleven in service, and two new carriers under construction. With 319,421 personnel on active duty and 99,616 in the Ready Reserve, the Navy is the third largest of the service branches. It has 282 deployable combat vessels and more than 3,700 operational aircraft as of March 2018, making it the second-largest air force in the world, after the United States Air Force.

Contents

Career

Heed was launched 19 June 1942 by the General Engineering & Dry Dock Company of Alameda, California; and commissioned 27 February 1943, Lt. J. J. Lind in command. After shakedown out of San Diego, California, Heed sailed on 24 April for the Aleutians where she took up patrolling station then acted as escort for convoys sailing to and from Alaskan ports. After minesweeping operations out of Dutch Harbor, Alaska, she sailed for Pearl Harbor on 1 December and took up duty there.

General Engineering & Dry Dock Company was a shipbuilding company in Alameda, California that was active from the 1920s through the 1940s. Relatively little is known about the history of the shipyard, but the company built ships for the Southern Pacific Railroad and the United States Coast Guard in the late 1920s and early 1930s.

Alameda, California City in California in the United States

Alameda is a city in Alameda County, California, United States. It is located on Alameda Island and Bay Farm Island, and is adjacent to and south of Oakland and east of San Francisco across the San Francisco Bay. Bay Farm Island, a portion of which is also known as "Harbor Bay Isle", is not actually an island, and is part of the mainland adjacent to the Oakland International Airport. The city's estimated 2017 population was 79,928. Alameda is a charter city, rather than a general law city, allowing the city to provide for any form of government. Alameda became a charter city and adopted a council–manager government in 1916, which it retains to the present.

Shakedown (testing)

A shakedown is a period of testing or a trial journey undergone by a ship, aircraft or other craft and its crew before being declared operational. Statistically, a proportion of the components will fail after a relatively short period of use, and those that survive this period can be expected to last for a much longer, and more importantly, predictable life-span. For example, if a bolt has a hidden flaw introduced during manufacturing, it will not be as reliable as other bolts of the same type.

On 22 January 1944 she joined Rear Admiral Richard L. Conolly's Northern Attack Force for the Marshall Islands Operations (29 January23 February 1944). Heed screened the transports until they entered Kwajalein Lagoon on 31 January for the initial landings then began her sweep of the anchorage areas. Screening, mine-sweeping operations and hydrographic work kept Heed busy until 31 March when she sailed for Pearl Harbor.

Richard L. Conolly United States Navy admiral

Richard Lansing Conolly was a United States Navy Admiral, who served during World War I and World War II.

Marshall Islands country in Oceania

The Marshall Islands, officially the Republic of the Marshall Islands, is an island country and a United States associated state near the equator in the Pacific Ocean, slightly west of the International Date Line. Geographically, the country is part of the larger island group of Micronesia. The country's population of 53,158 people is spread out over 29 coral atolls, comprising 1,156 individual islands and islets.

Hydrography Applied science of measurement and description of physical features of bodies of water

Hydrography is the branch of applied sciences which deals with the measurement and description of the physical features of oceans, seas, coastal areas, lakes and rivers, as well as with the prediction of their change over time, for the primary purpose of safety of navigation and in support of all other marine activities, including economic development, security and defence, scientific research, and environmental protection.

After escort duties at Pearl Harbor, Heed joined Vice Admiral Turner's Northern Attack Force as a unit of the Minesweeping and Hydrographic Survey Group for capture of Marianas' Saipan and Tinian (June–August 1944). After screening USS Louisville during fire support missions off the southern coast of Saipan, Heed patrolled between Saipan and Tinian and subsequently for the next seven months screened convoys between the Marshalls, the Carolines, and Marianas.

Richmond K. Turner Admiral in the United States Navy

Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner, commonly known as Admiral Kelly Turner, served in the United States Navy during World War II, and is best known for commanding the Amphibious Force during the campaign across the Pacific.

Saipan American island in the Mariana Islands

Saipan is the largest island of the Northern Mariana Islands, a commonwealth of the United States in the western Pacific Ocean. According to 2017 estimates by the United States Census Bureau, Saipan's population was 52,263.

Tinian island in the United States of America

Tinian is one of the three principal islands of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Together with uninhabited neighboring Aguigan, it forms Tinian Municipality, one of the four constituent municipalities of the Northern Marianas. Tinian's largest village is San Jose.

Heed sortied from Ulithi on 19 March 1945 as a unit of Admiral Blandy's Amphibious Support Force for the capture of Okinawa (14 March – 30 June 1945). After sweeping operations off Okinawa, she acted as patrol and escort ship until 28 April when she sailed for the United States via Pearl Harbor, arriving Seattle, Washington, 24 May. With the newest of sweep gear, Heed sailed again for the Western Pacific, arriving Eniwetok 9 October via Johnston Island. She carried out minesweeping operations at Okinawa, Sasebo, Formosa, and the East China Sea.

Ulithi island

Ulithi is an atoll in the Caroline Islands of the western Pacific Ocean, about 191 km (103 nmi) east of Yap. It consists of 40 islets totalling 4.5 km2 (1.7 sq mi), surrounding a lagoon about 36 km (22 mi) long and up to 24 km (15 mi) wide—at 548 km2 (212 sq mi) one of the largest in the world. It is administered by the state of Yap in the Federated States of Micronesia. Ulithi's population was 773 in 2000. There are four inhabited islands on Ulithi Atoll. They are Falalop, Asor (Yasor), Mogmog (Mwagmwog), and Fedarai (Fedraey). Falalop is the most accessible with an air strip, a small resort hotel, gas dealership, store and one of three public high schools in Yap state. Mogmog is the seat of the high chief of Ulithi Atoll though each island has its own chief. Other important islands are Losiap, Sorlen (Sohl'oay), and Potangeras (Potoangroas).

William H. P. Blandy American admiral

William Henry Purnell Blandy, known to friends as "Spike", was an admiral in the United States Navy during World War II.

Pacific Ocean Ocean between Asia and Australia in the west, the Americas in the east and Antarctica or the Southern Ocean in the south.

The Pacific Ocean is the largest and deepest of Earth's oceanic divisions. It extends from the Arctic Ocean in the north to the Southern Ocean in the south and is bounded by Asia and Australia in the west and the Americas in the east.

Heed returned to San Diego, California, 9 February 1946. Heed remained at San Diego, California and decommissioned there on 15 January 1947, joining the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Heed received five battle stars for World War II service.

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

Heed was recommissioned on 5 March 1952, Lt. E. N. Robinson, in command. Departing San Diego, California, 12 May 1952, Heed transited the Panama Canal and arrived Charleston, South Carolina, on 6 June. Between June 1952 and November 1953 Heed operated out of Charleston, South Carolina, and Norfolk, Virginia, making one deployment to the Mediterranean (6 January – 21 May 1953) and a cruise to Quebec, Canada (3–29 August 1953). Departing Charleston 16 November she sailed to Orange, Texas, and decommissioned there on 27 January 1954, and once again joined the Reserve Fleet. Reclassified MSF-100 on 7 February 1955, Heed remained at Orange, Texas, until struck from the Navy List on 1 March 1967.

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References

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships .The entry can be found here.