USS Laboon

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US Navy 100209-N-4774B-016 The guided-missile destroyer USS Laboon (DDG 58) pulls alongside the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) during a refueling-at-sea.jpg
USS Laboon on 9 February 2010
History
Flag of the United States.svgUnited States
Name:Laboon
Namesake: John Francis Laboon
Ordered: 13 December 1988
Builder: Bath Iron Works
Laid down: 23 March 1992
Launched: 20 February 1993
Commissioned: 18 March 1995
Homeport: Norfolk
Identification:
Motto:Without Fear
Status: in active service
Badge: USS Laboon DDG-58 Crest.png
General characteristics
Class and type: Arleigh Burke-class destroyer
Displacement:
  • Light: approx. 6,800 long tons (6,900 t)
  • Full: approx. 8,900 long tons (9,000 t)
Length: 505 ft (154 m)
Beam: 59 ft (18 m)
Draft: 31 ft (9.4 m)
Propulsion: 2 × Shafts
Speed: >30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph)
Range:
Complement:
Sensors and
processing systems:
Electronic warfare
& decoys:
Armament:
Aircraft carried: 2 Sikorsky MH-60R helicopters can be embarked

USS Laboon (DDG-58) is an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer in the United States Navy. She is named for Father John Francis Laboon (1921–1988), a captain in the Chaplain Corps of the United States Navy, who was awarded the Silver Star during World War II while serving on the submarine USS Peto.

Contents

Construction and career

Laboon's keel was laid down on 23 March 1992 at the Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine. She was launched on 20 February 1993. Laboon was commissioned on 18 March 1995, commanded by CDR Douglas D. McDonald. In the fall of 1996, she fired Tomahawk missiles at targets in Iraq, thus becoming the first Arleigh Burke-class destroyer to engage in combat.

In 1998, Laboon took part in NATO Exercise Dynamic Response 98, together with USS Wasp's Amphibious Ready Group.

On 12 September 2012, Laboon was ordered to the coast of Libya in what the Pentagon called a "contingency" in case a strike was ordered. This was in response to the 2012 diplomatic missions attacks. [1]

On 21 June 2015, Laboon entered the Black Sea along with the French ship Dupuy de Lôme as part of NATO's presence missions following the Annexation of Crimea by the Russian Federation. [2] While in the Black Sea, Laboon participated in joint maneuvers with a Romanian Navy Rear-Admiral Eustațiu Sebastian-class corvette for two days beginning on 22 June 2015.[ citation needed ] On 27 June 2015, Laboon began a two-day visit to the Black Sea port of Batumi, Georgia to participate in training with the Coast Guard of Georgia and offer tours of the ship. [3]

On 14 April 2018, she fired seven Tomahawk missiles from a position in the Red Sea as part of a bombing campaign in retaliation for the Syrian government's use of chemical weapons against people in Douma. [4]

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References

  1. "US moving Navy destroyers off coast of Libya". CNN. 12 September 2012. Retrieved 12 September 2012.
  2. LaGrone, Sam (22 June 2015). "Destroyer USS Laboon, French Surveillance Ship Enter Black Sea". USNI News. Retrieved 27 October 2015.
  3. "USS Laboon Missile Destroyer Visits Georgia". Georgia Today. 2 July 2015. Retrieved 27 October 2015.
  4. Mehta, Aaron; Copp, Tara (14 April 2018). "Coalition launched 105 weapons against Syria, with none intercepted, DoD says". Military Times. Retrieved 14 April 2018.