USS Mimosa (AN-26)

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History
Naval jack of the United States (1908-1912).svg US flag 48 stars.svgUnited States
Name: USS Mimosa
Namesake: A flowering tree found in warm regions
Builder: American Shipbuilding Company, Cleveland, Ohio
Laid down: 15 October 1940 as Mimosa (YN-21)
Launched: 15 March 1941
Sponsored by: Miss Alin Woehrman
Commissioned: 10 December 1942 as USS Mimosa (YN-21)
Decommissioned: 27 December 1946, at Vancouver, Washington
In service: 28 October 1941
Reclassified:AN-26, 20 January 1944
Struck: date unknown
Homeport: Tiburon, California
Honours and
awards:
two battle stars for World War II service
Fate: transferred to the U.S. Maritime Commission, 13 July 1961; scrapped at an unknown date
General characteristics
Type:Aloe-class net laying ship
Tonnage: 560 tons
Displacement: 850 tons
Length: 163 ft 2 in (49.73 m)
Beam: 30 ft 6 in (9.30 m)
Draft: 11 ft 8 in (3.56 m)
Propulsion: direct drive diesel engine, single propeller
Speed: 12.5 kn (23.2 km/h; 14.4 mph)
Complement: 4 officers, 44 enlisted
Armament: one single 3 in (76 mm) gun mount, three 20 mm guns, one y-gun

USS Mimosa (AN-26/YN-21) was an Aloe-class net laying ship which was assigned to serve the U.S. Navy during World War II with her protective anti-submarine nets.

<i>Aloe</i>-class net laying ship


The Aloe-class net laying ships were a class of thirty-two steel-hulled net laying ships built prior to World War II. The lead ship, USS Aloe, was laid down in October 1940 and launched the following January; the final member, USS Yew, was launched in October 1941. They were assigned tree and plant names in alphabetical order, but eight ships were renamed prior to launching, producing discontinuities in the name order. These ships were originally classed as YN and numbered 1-32, but were reclassified and renumbered in 1944 as AN-6 through AN-37.

A net laying ship, also known as a net layer, net tender, gate ship or boom defence vessel was a type of small auxiliary ship.

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

Contents

Built in Cleveland, Ohio

Mimosa (YN 21) was laid down 15 October 1940 by American Shipbuilding Company, Cleveland, Ohio, launched 15 March 1941, sponsored by Miss Alin Woehrman, and placed in service 28 October 1941, Lt. W. L. Freeburn in command.

World War service

East coast operations

Exiting the Great Lakes via the Welland Canal and the St. Lawrence River, Mimosa proceeded by short sailings down the U.S. East Coast. At the end of the year, with the United States at war, she steamed from Jacksonville, Florida, to bolster the defenses of the high priority Panama Canal.

Great Lakes System of interconnected, large lakes in North America

The Great Lakes, also called the Laurentian Great Lakes and the Great Lakes of North America, are a series of interconnected freshwater lakes primarily in the upper mid-east region of North America, on the Canada–United States border, which connect to the Atlantic Ocean through the Saint Lawrence River. They consist of Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario. Hydrologically, there are only four lakes, because Lakes Michigan and Huron join at the Straits of Mackinac. The lakes form the Great Lakes Waterway.

Welland Canal ship canal in Canada

The Welland Canal is a ship canal in Ontario, Canada, connecting Lake Ontario and Lake Erie. It forms a key section of the St. Lawrence Seaway and Great Lakes Waterway. Traversing the Niagara Peninsula from Port Weller to Port Colborne, it enables ships to ascend and descend the Niagara Escarpment and bypass Niagara Falls.

Jacksonville, Florida Largest city in Florida

Jacksonville is the most populous city in Florida, the most populous city in the southeastern United States and the largest city by area in the contiguous United States. It is the seat of Duval County, with which the city government consolidated in 1968. Consolidation gave Jacksonville its great size and placed most of its metropolitan population within the city limits. As of 2017, Jacksonville's population was estimated to be 892,062. The Jacksonville metropolitan area has a population of 1,523,615 and is the fourth largest in Florida.

For over 2 years she maintained the net defenses at Coco Solo, Panama Canal Zone, and also installed submarine nets at Trujillo Bay, Honduras; Port Limon, Costa Rica; and Talora Bay, Peru. Mimosa commissioned 10 December 1942.

Coco Solo United States Navy submarine base

Coco Solo was a United States Navy submarine base and naval air station, active from 1918 to the 1960s. It was established May 6, 1918. The site corresponds with modern-day Cativá in Panama. It was on the Atlantic Ocean (northwest) side of the Panama Canal Zone, near Colón, Panama. Five C-class submarines were based there during 1914–1919.

Panama Canal Zone Former unincorporated territory of the United States surrounded by the Republic of Panama

The Panama Canal Zone was an unincorporated territory of the United States from 1903 to 1979, centered on the Panama Canal and surrounded by the Republic of Panama. The zone consisted of the canal and an area generally extending five miles (8.0 km) on each side of the centerline, excluding Panama City and Colón, which otherwise would have been partly within the limits of the Zone. Its border spanned three of Panama's provinces. When reservoirs were created to assure a steady supply of water for the locks, those lakes were included within the Zone.

Trujillo, Honduras Municipality in Colón, Honduras

Trujillo is a city and a municipality on the northern Caribbean coast of the Honduran department of Colón, of which the city is the capital.

In January 1944, 1-1⁄2 years after she escaped a torpedo attack, Mimosa showed the effectiveness of the Navy’s antisubmarine program to check the U-boat menace when she assisted in removing the nets along the Costa Rican and Honduran coasts. During this duty, the vessel was redesignated AN-26 on 20 January 1944.

Torpedo self-propelled underwater weapon

A modern torpedo is a self-propelled weapon with an explosive warhead, launched above or below the water surface, propelled underwater towards a target, and designed to detonate either on contact with its target or in proximity to it.

U-boat German submarine of the First or Second World War

U-boat is an anglicised version of the German word U-Boot[ˈuːboːt](listen), a shortening of Unterseeboot, literally "underseaboat." While the German term refers to any submarine, the English one refers specifically to military submarines operated by Germany, particularly in the First and Second World Wars. Although at times they were efficient fleet weapons against enemy naval warships, they were most effectively used in an economic warfare role and enforcing a naval blockade against enemy shipping. The primary targets of the U-boat campaigns in both wars were the merchant convoys bringing supplies from Canada and other parts of the British Empire, and from the United States to the United Kingdom and to the Soviet Union and the Allied territories in the Mediterranean. German submarines also destroyed Brazilian merchant ships during World War II, causing Brazil to declare war on the Axis powers in 1944.

Pacific Ocean operations

Transiting the Panama Canal 21 April 1944, she sailed for the Mariana Islands, arriving 20 June 1944 in the midst of the Battle of Saipan. First removing the Japanese defensive nets and wrecked ships, Mimosa labored until 9 September 1944 helping to install a new net system for harbors on Saipan and Tinian.

Mariana Islands archipelago in western North Pacific Ocean

The Mariana Islands are a crescent-shaped archipelago comprising the summits of fifteen mostly dormant volcanic mountains in the western North Pacific Ocean, between the 12th and 21st parallels north and along the 145th meridian east. They lie south-southeast of Japan, west-southwest of Hawaii, north of New Guinea and east of the Philippines, demarcating the Philippine Sea's eastern limit. They are found in the northern part of the western Oceanic sub-region of Micronesia, and are politically divided into two jurisdictions of the United States: the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and, at the southern end of the chain, the territory of Guam. The islands were named after the influential Spanish queen Mariana of Austria.

Battle of Saipan battle of the Pacific campaign of World War II on the island of Saipan in the Mariana Islands

The Battle of Saipan was a battle of the Pacific campaign of World War II, fought on the island of Saipan in the Mariana Islands from 15 June to 9 July 1944. The Allied invasion fleet embarking the expeditionary forces left Pearl Harbor on 5 June 1944, the day before Operation Overlord in Europe was launched. The U.S. 2nd Marine Division, 4th Marine Division, and the Army's 27th Infantry Division, commanded by Lieutenant General Holland Smith, defeated the 43rd Infantry Division of the Imperial Japanese Army, commanded by Lieutenant General Yoshitsugu Saito. The loss of Saipan, with the death of at least 29,000 troops and heavy civilian casualties, precipitated the resignation of Japanese Prime Minister Hideki Tōjō and left the Japanese mainland within the range of United States Army Air Forces B-29 bombers.

Empire of Japan Empire in the Asia-Pacific region between 1868–1947

The Empire of Japan was the historical nation-state and great power that existed from the Meiji Restoration in 1868 to the enactment of the 1947 constitution of modern Japan.

On 2 September 1945 as the war ended, Mimosa began removing the 6.5 miles (10.5 km) of nets she had tended. When the job was completed, she sailed 26 October 1945 for San Pedro, California, arriving 27 November 1945.

Post-war deactivation

Following alterations, she departed San Pedro, California for Astoria, Oregon on 21 June 1946 with Teak (AN 35) in tow. Two months later Mimosa was herself towed from Portland, Oregon to Vancouver, Washington for inactivation. She was decommissioned 27 September 1946 and joined the Pacific Reserve Fleet.

On 13 July 1961 she was turned over to the U.S. Maritime Commission at Olympia, Washington and entered the National Defense Reserve Fleet there. She was eventually scrapped, but the date is unknown.

Honors and awards

Mimosa (AN 26) received two battle stars for World War II service.

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