USS Norman Scott

Last updated
USS Norman Scott (DD-690) at sea in October 1945.jpg
USS Norman Scott (DD-690) in October 1945
History
US flag 48 stars.svgUnited States
Name: USS Norman Scott
Namesake: Norman Scott
Builder: Bath Iron Works
Laid down: 26 April 1943
Launched: 28 August 1943
Commissioned: 5 November 1943
Decommissioned: 30 April 1946
Struck: 15 April 1973
Fate:
  • sold for scrap,
  • 3 December 1973
General characteristics
Class and type: Fletcher-class destroyer
Displacement: 2,050 tons
Length: 376.4 ft (114.7 m)
Beam: 39.6 ft (12.1 m)
Draft: 13.8 ft (4.2 m)
Propulsion:
  • 60,000  shp (45,000 kW);
  • 2 propellors
Speed: 38 knots (70 km/h; 44 mph)
Range: 6,500 nautical miles (12,000 km; 7,500 mi) at 15 knots (28 km/h; 17 mph)
Complement: 329
Armament:

USS Norman Scott (DD-690) was a United States Navy Fletcher-class destroyer named for Rear-Admiral Norman Scott (18891942), who was killed in the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal and awarded the Medal of Honor.

United States Navy Naval warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Navy (USN) is the naval warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States. It is the largest and most capable navy in the world and it has been estimated that in terms of tonnage of its active battle fleet alone, it is larger than the next 13 navies combined, which includes 11 U.S. allies or partner nations. with the highest combined battle fleet tonnage and the world's largest aircraft carrier fleet, with eleven in service, and two new carriers under construction. With 319,421 personnel on active duty and 99,616 in the Ready Reserve, the Navy is the third largest of the service branches. It has 282 deployable combat vessels and more than 3,700 operational aircraft as of March 2018, making it the second-largest air force in the world, after the United States Air Force.

<i>Fletcher</i>-class destroyer 1940s class of destroyers of the United States Navy

The Fletcher class was a class of destroyers built by the United States during World War II. The class was designed in 1939, as a result of dissatisfaction with the earlier destroyer leader types of the Porter and Somers classes. Some went on to serve during the Korean War and into the Vietnam War.

Destroyer Type of warship

In naval terminology, a destroyer is a fast, maneuverable long-endurance warship intended to escort larger vessels in a fleet, convoy or battle group and defend them against smaller powerful short-range attackers. They were originally developed in the late 19th century by Fernando Villaamil for the Spanish Navy as a defense against torpedo boats, and by the time of the Russo-Japanese War in 1904, these "torpedo boat destroyers" (TBDs) were "large, swift, and powerfully armed torpedo boats designed to destroy other torpedo boats". Although the term "destroyer" had been used interchangeably with "TBD" and "torpedo boat destroyer" by navies since 1892, the term "torpedo boat destroyer" had been generally shortened to simply "destroyer" by nearly all navies by the First World War.

Contents

Norman Scott was laid down 26 April 1943 by Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine. She was launched 28 August 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Norman Scott, widow of Admiral Scott; and commissioned 5 November 1943, Commander Seymour D. Owens in command.

Bath Iron Works American shipyard located on the Kennebec River in Bath, Maine

Bath Iron Works (BIW) is a major United States shipyard located on the Kennebec River in Bath, Maine, founded in 1884 as Bath Iron Works, Limited. BIW has built private, commercial, and military vessels, most of which have been ordered by the United States Navy. The shipyard has built and sometimes designed battleships, frigates, cruisers, and destroyers, including the Arleigh Burke class which are currently among the world's most advanced surface warships.

Bath, Maine City in Maine, United States

Bath is a city in Sagadahoc County, Maine, in the United States. The population was 8,514 at the 2010 census, and 8,357 as of 2013, the population has had a change of -10.2% since 2000. It is the county seat of Sagadahoc County, which includes one city and 10 towns. The city is popular with tourists, many drawn by its 19th-century architecture. It is home to the Bath Iron Works and Heritage Days Festival, held annually on the Fourth of July weekend. It is commonly known as "The City of Ships". Bath is part of the metropolitan statistical area of Greater Portland.

Ship commissioning is the act or ceremony of placing a ship in active service, and may be regarded as a particular application of the general concepts and practices of project commissioning. The term is most commonly applied to the placing of a warship in active duty with its country's military forces. The ceremonies involved are often rooted in centuries old naval tradition.

History

On 14 January 1944, Norman Scott left Boston, escorting the cruiser Canberra to Pearl Harbor, arriving 1 February. Immediately, she served in the Marshall Islands Operations, accompanying the aircraft carrier USS Gambier Bay to newly-won Majuro. She returned to Pearl Harbor to prepare for the Mariana Islands Operations, during which she escorted heavy bombardment ships as well as conducting fire support missions of her own, during the invasions of Saipan, 15 June, and of Tinian. While firing on Tinian 24 July, during the invasion, the battleship Colorado came under fire from shore batteries. Norman Scott maneuvered to draw fire away from Colorado, and was hit six times within a few seconds. Norman Scott's captain Seymour Owens and 22 others were killed, with an additional 57 wounded. Temporary repairs were made at Saipan. On 28 July, she sailed for Pearl Harbor and Mare Island Naval Shipyard, where permanent repairs were completed on 21 October. Norman Scott featured in the October 1944 RKO-Pathé film This is America-Navy Yard, about her repairs after being hit at Tinian.

Boston Navy Yard shipbuilding facility in the United States Navy

The Boston Navy Yard, originally called the Charlestown Navy Yard and later Boston Naval Shipyard, was one of the oldest shipbuilding facilities in the United States Navy. It was established in 1801 as part of the recent establishment of the new U.S. Department of the Navy in 1798. After 175 years of military service, it was decommissioned as a naval installation on 1 July 1974.

Cruiser Type of large warships

A cruiser is a type of warship. Modern cruisers are generally the largest ships in a fleet after aircraft carriers and amphibious assault ships, and can usually perform several roles.

USS <i>Canberra</i> (CA-70)

USS Canberra (CA-70/CAG-2) was a Baltimore-class cruiser and later a Boston-class guided missile cruiser of the United States Navy. Originally to be named USS Pittsburgh, the ship was renamed before launch to honor the loss of the Australian cruiser HMAS Canberra during the Battle of Savo Island. USS Canberra was the first USN warship named for a foreign warship or a foreign capital city.

Norman Scott was part of the famed squadron Desron 54 that opened the Battle of Surigao Strait, though she was not present for that action. Norman Scott left Mare Island on 21 October 1944 after her repair to rejoin Desron 54.

Norman Scott trained her new crew in Hawaiian waters, then sailed for Manus. She escorted transports from Manus to the Philippines until 9 February 1945. She then joined the fast carrier task forces of the Fifth and Third Fleets, ranging the western Pacific for strikes which supported the assaults on Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Later in the war, she closed the Japanese home shores as battleships bombarded them. On 15 July 1945, Norman Scott joined battleships Missouri, Wisconsin, and Iowa and destroyers Remey and McGowan in attacking the seaport city of Muroran. These were the first surface ships to bomb the Japanese homeland.

Manus Island part of Manus Province in northern Papua New Guinea

Manus Island is part of Manus Province in northern Papua New Guinea and is the largest of the Admiralty Islands. It is the fifth-largest island in Papua New Guinea, with an area of 2,100 km2 (810 sq mi), measuring around 100 km × 30 km. According to the 2000 census, the whole Manus Province had a population of 43,387, rising to 50,321 as of 2011 Census. Lorengau, the capital of Manus Province, is located on the island. Momote Airport, the terminal for Manus Province, is located on nearby Los Negros Island. A bridge connects Los Negros Island to Manus Island and the province capital of Lorengau. In addition to its resident population, asylum seekers have been relocated here from Australia between 2001 and 2004 and since 2012.

Philippines Republic in Southeast Asia

The Philippines, officially the Republic of the Philippines, is an archipelagic country in Southeast Asia. Situated in the western Pacific Ocean, it consists of about 7,641 islands that are categorized broadly under three main geographical divisions from north to south: Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao. The capital city of the Philippines is Manila and the most populous city is Quezon City, both part of Metro Manila. Bounded by the South China Sea on the west, the Philippine Sea on the east and the Celebes Sea on the southwest, the Philippines shares maritime borders with Taiwan to the north, Vietnam to the west, Palau to the east, and Malaysia and Indonesia to the south.

United States Fifth Fleet Ocean-going component of the United States Navy

The Fifth Fleet is a numbered fleet of the United States Navy. It has been responsible for naval forces in the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, Arabian Sea, and parts of the Indian Ocean since 1995 after a 48-year hiatus. It shares a commander and headquarters with U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT) in Bahrain. As of 7 December 2018, the commander of the 5th Fleet is Vice Admiral James J. Malloy. Fifth Fleet/NAVCENT is a component command of, and reports to, U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM).

After supporting the occupation of the Japanese naval base at Yokosuka, Norman Scott returned briefly to Okinawa, then proceeded to the west coast, arriving for Navy Day (27 October) celebrations at Tacoma, Washington. After operating out of San Francisco, she was decommissioned 30 April 1946 and was berthed in reserve at San Diego, moving in 1947 to Mare Island. Norman Scott was stricken on 15 April 1973. She was sold for scrap on 3 December 1973.

United States Fleet Activities Yokosuka United States Navy base in Yokosuka, Japan

United States Fleet Activities Yokosuka or Commander Fleet Activities Yokosuka is a United States Navy base in Yokosuka, Japan. Its mission is to maintain and operate base facilities for the logistic, recreational, administrative support and service of the U.S. Naval Forces Japan, Seventh Fleet and other operating forces assigned in the Western Pacific. CFAY is the largest strategically important U.S. naval installation in the western Pacific. As of August 2013, it was commanded by Captain David Glenister.

Navy Day an annual celebration a countrys navy

Several nations observe or have observed a Navy Day to recognize their navy.

Tacoma, Washington City in Washington, United States

Tacoma is a mid-sized urban port city and the county seat of Pierce County, Washington, United States. The city is on Washington's Puget Sound, 32 miles (51 km) southwest of Seattle, 31 miles (50 km) northeast of the state capital, Olympia, and 58 miles (93 km) northwest of Mount Rainier National Park. The population was 198,397, according to the 2010 census. Tacoma is the second-largest city in the Puget Sound area and the third largest in the state. Tacoma also serves as the center of business activity for the South Sound region, which has a population of around 1 million.

Norman Scott received seven battle stars for World War II service.

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