USS Palau

Last updated

USS Palau CVE-122 1950.jpg
USS Palau (CVE-122) in 1950
History
Flag of the United States.svgUnited States
Name: USS Palau
Builder: Todd Pacific Shipyards
Laid down: 19 February 1945
Launched: 6 August 1945
Commissioned: 15 January 1946
Decommissioned: 15 June 1954
Stricken: 1 April 1960
Fate: Sold for scrapping 13 July 1960
General characteristics
Class and type: Commencement Bay-class escort carrier
Displacement: 10,900 long tons (11,100 t)
Length: 557 ft (170 m)
Beam: 75 ft (23 m)
Draft: 32 ft (9.8 m)
Propulsion:
  • Steam turbines, 16,000 shp
  • 2 shafts
Speed: 19 knots (22 mph; 35 km/h)
Complement: 1,066
Armament:
Aircraft carried: 34
Service record
Part of:

USS Palau (CVE–122) was a Commencement Bay-class escort carrier of the United States Navy.

She was laid down by the Todd-Pacific Shipyards Inc., Tacoma, Washington, 19 February 1945; launched 6 August 1945; sponsored by Mrs. J. P. Whitney; and commissioned 15 January 1946, Capt. W. E. Cleaves in command.

Commissioned as the Navy began its post-war demobilization, Palau completed shakedown off California, transited the Panama Canal, underwent post shakedown availability at Boston, and on 11 May moved down the coast to Norfolk where she was immobilized until May 1947. On 22 May she steamed south to Cuba for refresher training, after which she headed north to Norfolk and New York, whence she steamed to Recife, thence to West Africa. She returned to the east coast 16 August and after another availability at Boston was again immobilized at Norfolk, December 1947 – March 1948. During the spring of 1948 she conducted operations off the east coast and on 3 June departed for the Mediterranean to deliver planes, under the Turkish Aid Program, to representatives of that country at Yesilkoy. During this mission the ship and crew helped in the evacuation of U.N. delegation and officials from Haifa on 8 July during the second phase of the Arab–Israeli War. Transiting to Isle of Rhodes and staying there until 24 July with their return to Haifa after a truce was negotiated in the war. Returning to Norfolk 7 August, she remained in the western Atlantic, ranging from the Maritime Provinces to the West Indies, until April 1952. Then departing Norfolk she returned to the Mediterranean to operate with the 6th Fleet until late June, when she resumed duties with the 2nd Fleet on the east coast.

USS Palau with HRP helicopters, in 1951. USS Palau (CVE-122) with HRPs NAN8-51.jpg
USS Palau with HRP helicopters, in 1951.

Palau, which was designated for inactivation in early 1953, was retained in commission to perform one final ferry assignment, planes to Yokosuka (8 August – 22 October). On her return she entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, decommissioning 15 June 1954. Berthed with the Philadelphia Group, Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Palau remained a unit of that fleet until struck from the Navy List 1 April 1960 and sold, 13 July 1960, to Jacques Pierot, Jr. and Sons, New York.

Some parts were salvaged from the scrapyard in Sestao, and installed in Picos de Europa as a mountaineers' hut.

Related Research Articles

USS <i>Ault</i>

USS Ault (DD-698) was an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer in the United States Navy. She was named for Commander William B. Ault, air group commander aboard Lexington. Commander Ault was declared missing in action on 8 May 1942 after leading an air attack in the Battle of the Coral Sea and was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for his action in the battle.

USS <i>Randolph</i> (CV-15)

USS Randolph (CV/CVA/CVS-15) was one of 24 Essex-class aircraft carriers built during World War II for the United States Navy. The second US Navy ship to bear the name, she was named for the frigate Randolph of the Continental Navy,. Randolph was commissioned in October 1944, and served in several campaigns in the Pacific Theater of Operations, earning three battle stars. Decommissioned shortly after the end of the war, she was modernized and recommissioned in the early 1950s as an attack carrier (CVA), and then eventually became an antisubmarine carrier (CVS). In her second career she operated exclusively in the Atlantic, Mediterranean, and Caribbean. In the early 1960s she served as the recovery ship for two Project Mercury space missions, including John Glenn's historic first orbital flight.

USS <i>Kula Gulf</i>

USS Vermillion Bay (CVE-108) was an Commencement Bay-class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was renamed Kula Gulf on 6 November 1943; laid down by Todd-Pacific Shipyards, Inc., Tacoma, Wash. on 16 December 1943; launched on 15 August 1944; sponsored by Miss Dorothy Mott; completed by Willamette Iron & Steel Corp., Portland, Oregon; and commissioned at Portland on 12 May 1945, Captain J. W. King in command.

USS <i>Siboney</i> (CVE-112)

USS Siboney (CVE-112/AKV-12) was a Commencement Bay-class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was the second ship named for Siboney, Cuba, the Cuban Village near which troops of Theodore Roosevelt's Rough Riders fought during the Spanish–American War.

USS <i>Hawkins</i> (DD-873)

USS Hawkins (DD-873) was a Gearing-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. Following the war, the ship saw service in the Korean War and in the 1970s, was transferred to the Republic of China Navy as Shao Yang, also known as Tze Yang. She remained in service until the 1990s. The ship was then scrapped with the exception of her superstructure, which became part of a display at a museum.

USS <i>Vogelgesang</i> (DD-862)

USS Vogelgesang (DD-862) was a Gearing-class destroyer in the United States Navy. She was named for Rear Admiral Carl Theodore Vogelgesang USN (1869–1927).

USS <i>Harold J. Ellison</i> (DD-864)

USS Harold J. Ellison (DD-864) was a Gearing-class destroyer in service with the United States Navy from 1945 to 1983. She was then transferred to Pakistan and renamed Shah Jahan (D-164). The ship was finally sunk as a target in 1994.

USS <i>Portsmouth</i> (CL-102)

USS Portsmouth (CL–102) was a Cleveland-class light cruiser of the United States Navy, the third ship to carry the name.

USS <i>Douglas H. Fox</i>

USS Douglas H. Fox (DD-779) an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer, was named in honor of Lieutenant Commander Douglas H. Fox, the commanding officer of the destroyer USS Barton, who went down with his ship when she was torpedoed and sunk in the naval battle of Guadalcanal on 13 November 1942. Fox was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for his contribution to the defeat of a superior enemy force in this battle, and was later awarded a Gold Star in lieu of a second Navy Cross for earlier actions on 26 and 30 October and 3 November, when he rescued survivors of the aircraft carrier USS Hornet under hazardous conditions.

USS <i>Sharkey</i> (DD-281)

USS Sharkey (DD-281) was a Clemson-class destroyer in the United States Navy following World War I. She was named for William J. Sharkey.

USS <i>Kimberly</i> (DD-521)

USS Kimberly (DD-521) was a Fletcher-class destroyer in service with the United States Navy from 1943 to 1947 and from 1951 to 1954. In 1967, she was transferred Republic of China Navy where she served as ROCS An Yang (DD-18/DDG-918) until 1999. The destroyer was finally sunk as a target in 2003.

USS <i>Nantahala</i> (AO-60)

USS Nantahala (AO–60), the second ship of this name, was laid down under Maritime Commission contract by Bethlehem Sparrows Point Shipyard, Inc., Sparrows Point, Maryland, on 31 October 1943. Launched on 29 April 1944; sponsored by Miss Mary Louise Reed; delivered to the Navy 19 June 1944; and commissioned the same day, Comdr. Palmer M. Gunnell in command.

USS <i>Waldron</i>

USS Waldron (DD-699), an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for John C. Waldron, a U.S. Naval aviator who led a squadron of torpedo bombers in World War II.

USS <i>Zellars</i>

USS Zellars (DD-777), an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer, was named for Lt. (j.g.) Thomas Edward Zellars, a sailor who served on the battleship USS Mississippi. On 12 June 1924, Thomas Zellars and 47 other crew members died in a firing accident. However, before they were killed, Zellars apparently opened a flood valve that extinguished the fire, preventing further damage to the ship and likely saving the lives of his shipmates. The destroyer that was named for him was laid down on 24 December 1943 at Seattle, Washington, by the Todd-Pacific Shipyards, Inc.; launched on 19 July 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Thomas M. Zellars; and commissioned on 25 October 1944, Commander Blinn Van Mater in command. Zellars was eventually transferred to the Iranian Navy and renamed Babr. The current status of the ship is unknown.

USS <i>Putnam</i> (DD-757)

USS Putnam (DD-757), an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for Charles Putnam. She was built and saw action in the Pacific during World War II. She was laid down on 11 July 1943 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Shipbuilding Division, San Francisco, California and launched on 26 March 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Doana Putnam Wheeler. The ship was commissioned on 12 October 1944. Cdr. Frederick V. H. Hilles was in command.

USS <i>Rich</i> (DD-820)

USS Rich (DD-820/DDE-820) was a Gearing-class destroyer in the United States Navy during the Korean War and the Vietnam War. She was the second ship named in honor of Lieutenant Ralph McMaster Rich (1916–1942), who was awarded the Navy Cross for his leadership as a naval aviator aboard USS Enterprise during the Battle of Midway.

USS <i>Keppler</i> (DD-765)

The third USS Keppler (DD/DDE-765) was a Gearing-class destroyer in the United States Navy during the Korean War and the Vietnam War. She was named for Boatswain's Mate First Class Reinhardt J. Keppler (1918–1942), who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for "extraordinary heroism" during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal.

USS <i>Holder</i> (DD-819)

USS Holder (DD/DDE-819) was a Gearing-class destroyer of the United States Navy, the second Navy ship named for Lieutenant (jg) Randolph Mitchell Holder, a Navy pilot who was killed during the Battle of Midway.

USS <i>Turner</i> (DD-834)

USS Turner (DD/DDR-834) was a Gearing-class destroyer of the United States Navy, the third Navy ship named for Captain Daniel Turner (1794?–1850).

USS <i>Robert L. Wilson</i> (DD-847)

USS Robert L. Wilson (DD/DDE-847) was a Gearing-class destroyer of the United States Navy, named for Marine Private First Class Robert L. Wilson (1920–1944), who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for "conspicuous gallantry" in the Battle of Tinian.

References

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships .