USS Pink (1863)

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History
US Naval Jack 36 stars.svg US flag 34 stars.svgUnited States
Ordered: as Zouave
Laid down: date unknown
Launched: 1863
Acquired: 14 December 1863
Commissioned: 6 February 1864
Out of service: 22 September 1865
Struck: 1865 (est.)
Fate: sank, 22 September 1865
General characteristics
Displacement: 184 tons
Length: 110' 4"
Beam: 24' 6"
Draught: depth of hold 7'
Propulsion:
Speed: not known
Complement: 24
Armament:

USS Pink (1863) was a steamer commissioned by the Union Navy during the American Civil War. [1] She served the Union Navy's struggle against the Confederate States of America in various ways: as a tugboat, a gunboat, and as a small (184 ton) transport.

Contents

Steamer constructed at Newburgh, New York, in 1863

Pink, a wooden screw tug built in 1863 as Zouave at Newburgh, New York, was purchased by the Union Navy 14 December 1863 from New York and Glen Cove Steam Navigation Co.; and commissioned 6 February 1864, Acting Master John B. Dicks in command.

Temporary service in the North Atlantic blockade

The new tug sailed for the gulf early in April 1864 but was detained in the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron during the spring and early summer for repairs at Norfolk, Virginia, and service as a small transport on the James River.

Assignment with the West Gulf blockade

She resumed her voyage south with sister tugs USS Tritonia, Athenia, and USS Rose 26 July and joined the West Gulf Blockading Squadron in Mississippi Sound on 5 August, the day of Admiral David Farragut's great victory in Mobile Bay.

She supported Union operations, primarily in Mobile Bay, until after the end of the Civil War.

Post-war sinking of Pink after running aground

While steaming from New Orleans, Louisiana, toward Mobile, Alabama, Pink ran aground on Dauphin Island before dawn 22 September 1865 and bilged beyond salvage.

See also

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References

  1. "List of Ships" Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion. Retrieved 2015-08-28.

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships .The entry can be found here.