USS Polly (SP-690)

Last updated
USS Polly (SP-690).jpg
USS Polly (SP-690) during World War I.
History
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States
Name:
  • Howmornel
  • Kakhin IV
  • Polly
Owner: Private owners
Builder: New York Yacht, Launch and Engineering Company, Morris Heights, the Bronx, New York
Completed: 1909
Fate: Sold to U.S. Navy 14 May 1917
History
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States Navy
Name: USS Polly
Namesake: Previous name retained
Acquired: 14 May 1917
Commissioned: 15 May 1917
Struck: 11 March 1919
Fate: Transferred to U.S. Bureau of Fisheries 9 September 1919
History
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Flag of the United States Bureau of Fisheries.svg U.S. Bureau of Fisheries
Name: USFS Curlew
Namesake: Curlew, a bird of the genus Numenius characterized by a long, slender, down-curved bill and mottled brown plumage
Acquired: 9 September 1919
Identification:
Notes: Retired 1937–1938
General characteristics
(as U.S. Navy vessel)
Type: Patrol vessel
Tonnage: 28 gross register tons
Length: 61 ft 9 in (18.82 m)
Beam: 11 ft (3.4 m)
Draft: 3 ft (0.91 m)
Speed: 17 knots
Complement: 10
Armament:

USS Polly (SP-690) was a United States Navy patrol vessel in commission from 1917 to 1919. After the conclusion of her Navy career, she operated in the fleet of the United States Bureau of Fisheries as USFS Curlew.

United States Navy Naval warfare branch of US Armed Forces

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Contents

Construction and early history

Polly as the private motorboat Kahkin IV sometime between 1909 and 1917. Motorboat Kahkin IV.jpg
Polly as the private motorboat Kahkin IV sometime between 1909 and 1917.

Polly was built as the private motorboat Howmornel by the New York Yacht, Launch and Engineering Company at Morris Heights in the Bronx, New York, in 1909. She later was renamed Kakhin IV and Polly.

Motorboat boat which is powered by an engine

A motorboat, speedboat, or powerboat is a boat which is powered by an engine. Some motorboats are fitted with inboard engines, others have an outboard motor installed on the rear, containing the internal combustion engine, the gearbox and the propeller in one portable unit.

Morris Heights, Bronx Neighborhood of the Bronx in New York City

Morris Heights is a residential neighborhood located in the West Bronx. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: West Burnside Avenue to the north, Jerome Avenue to the east, the Cross-Bronx Expressway to the south, and the Harlem River to the west. University Avenue is the primary thoroughfare through Morris Heights.

New York (state) American state

New York is a state in the Northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.54 million residents in 2018, it is the fourth most populous state. In order to distinguish the state from the city with the same name, it is sometimes referred to as New York State.

U.S. Navy

On 14 May 1917, the U.S. Navy purchased Polly from William H. Merriman, of New Haven, Connecticut, for use as a section patrol boat during World War I. She was commissioned at Newport, Rhode Island, as USS Polly (SP-690) on 15 May 1917 with Chief Quartermaster H. L. Wakeman, USNRF, in command.

New Haven, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

New Haven is a coastal city in the U.S. state of Connecticut. It is located on New Haven Harbor on the northern shore of Long Island Sound in New Haven County, Connecticut, and is part of the New York metropolitan area. With a population of 129,779 as determined by the 2010 United States Census, it is the second-largest city in Connecticut after Bridgeport. New Haven is the principal municipality of Greater New Haven, which had a total population of 862,477 in 2010.

Connecticut U.S. state in the United States

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. As of the 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index (0.962), and median household income in the United States. It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, New York to the west, and Long Island Sound to the south. Its capital is Hartford and its most populous city is Bridgeport. It is part of New England, although portions of it are often grouped with New York and New Jersey as the tri-state area. The state is named for the Connecticut River which approximately bisects the state. The word "Connecticut" is derived from various anglicized spellings of an Algonquian word for "long tidal river".

Section patrol patrol boat owned by civilian

A Section Patrol craft was a civilian vessel registered by the United States Navy for potential wartime service before, during, and shortly after World War I.

Assigned to the 2nd Naval District in southern New England, Polly carried out patrol duties for the rest of World War I.

New England Region in the northeastern United States

New England is a region composed of six states in the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut. It is bordered by the state of New York to the west and by the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick to the northeast and Quebec to the north. The Atlantic Ocean is to the east and southeast, and Long Island Sound is to the south. Boston is New England's largest city, as well as the capital of Massachusetts. Greater Boston is the largest metropolitan area, with nearly a third of New England's population; this area includes Worcester, Massachusetts, Manchester, New Hampshire, and Providence, Rhode Island.

Polly was stricken from the Navy List on 11 March 1919 and transferred to the United States Bureau of Fisheries on 9 September 1919. [2]

U.S. Bureau of Fisheries

The U.S. Bureau of Fisheries (BOF) renamed the vessel USFS Curlew, and, after modifying her for fisheries duty, assigned her to the BOF station at Cape Vincent, New York, for use in fish-culture work on Lake Ontario. [3]

Cape Vincent, New York Town in New York, United States

Cape Vincent is a town in Jefferson County, New York, United States. The population was 2,777 at the 2010 census.

Lake Ontario one of the Great Lakes in North America

Lake Ontario is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. It is surrounded on the north, west, and southwest by the Canadian province of Ontario, and on the south and east by the American state of New York, whose water boundaries meet in the middle of the lake. Ontario, Canada's most populous province, was named for the lake. Many of Ontario's most populous cities, including Toronto, Canada's most populous city, and Hamilton, are on the lake's northern and western shores respectively. In the Huron language, the name Ontarí'io means "Lake of Shining Waters". Its primary inlet is the Niagara River from Lake Erie. The last in the Great Lakes chain, Lake Ontario serves as the outlet to the Atlantic Ocean via the Saint Lawrence River. It is the only Great Lake not to border the state of Michigan.

During the summer of 1922, the Cape Vincent station installed electric lighting aboard Curlew and attached metal plates to the forward part of her hull at the waterline to protect her planking. [4] On 24 September 1923, Curlew rescued 58 passengers from the Canadian steamboat Waubic, which had run aground in fog at Bear Point about 8 nautical miles (15 km; 9.2 mi) from Cape Vincent while making her daily run between Cape Vincent and Kingston, Ontario, Canada. [5] During fiscal year 1928, which ran from 1 July 1927 to 30 June 1928, Curlew underwent extensive repairs and alterations and her original engine was replaced by a diesel engine. [6]

United States Department of Commerce records list Curlew as being in the Bureau of Fisheries fleet as of 30 June 1937 [7] but not as of 30 June 1938, [8] indicating that the Bureau retired her sometime during fiscal year 1938 (1 July 1937–30 June 1938).

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USS <i>Cobra</i> (SP-626)

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USFS <i>Crane</i>

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USFS <i>Blue Wing</i>

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USFS <i>Brant</i>

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References

  1. U.S. Department of Commerce Bureau of Navigation and Steamboat Inspection, Merchant Vessels of the United States (Including Yachts and Government Vessels), Year Ended June 30, 1933, Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, 1932, pp. 151, 1131.
  2. Bureau of Fisheries, Report of the United States Commissioner of Fisheries for the Fiscal Year 1919 With Appendixes, Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1919, p. 55.
  3. Bureau of Fisheries, Report of the United States Commissioner of Fisheries for the Fiscal Year 1921 With Appendixes, Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1922, p. 49.
  4. Bureau of Fisheries, Propagation and Distribution of Food Fishes, Fiscal Year 1923, Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1924, p. 45.
  5. Anonymous, "Steamer Waubic Goes Aground," Cape Vincent Eagle, September 27, 1923, unpaginated
  6. Bureau of Fisheries, Propagation and Distribution of Food Fishes, Fiscal Year 1928, Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1929, p. 369.
  7. U.S. Department of Commerce Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation, Merchant Vessels of the United States (Including Yachts and Government Vessels), Year Ended June 30, 1937, Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1937, p. 619.
  8. U.S. Department of Commerce Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation, Merchant Vessels of the United States (Including Yachts and Government Vessels), Year Ended June 30, 1938, Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, 1938, p. 531.