USS Primrose (1863)

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History
US Naval Jack 36 stars.svg US flag 34 stars.svgUnited States
Ordered: date unknown
Laid down: date unknown
Launched: as Nellie B. Vaughn
Acquired: 14 January 1863
Commissioned: 26 February 1863
Decommissioned: 1871
Struck: 1871
Fate: sold, 17 March 1871
General characteristics
Displacement: 94 tons
Length: 83 ft (25 m)
Beam: 17 ft (5.2 m)
Draught: depth 9”, draft 7’
Propulsion: steam engine, screw
Speed: not known
Complement: not known
Armament:
  • one 30-pounder rifled gun,
  • one 24-pounder howitzer

USS Primrose (1863), a screw steamer tugboat, armed with a heavy rifled gun and a howitzer capable of dropping a 24 pound ball, was acquired by the Union Navy during the American Civil War.

Tugboat boat that maneuvers other vessels by pushing or towing them

A tugboat is a type of vessel that maneuvers other vessels by pushing or pulling them either by direct contact or by means of a tow line. Tugs typically move vessels that either are restricted in their ability to maneuver on their own, such as ships in a crowded harbor or a narrow canal, or those that cannot move by themselves, such as barges, disabled ships, log rafts, or oil platforms. Tugboats are powerful for their size and strongly built, and some are ocean-going. Some tugboats serve as icebreakers or salvage boats. Early tugboats had steam engines, but today most have diesel engines. Many tugboats have firefighting monitors, allowing them to assist in firefighting, especially in harbors.

Union Navy United States Navy during the American Civil War

The Union Navy was the United States Navy (USN) during the American Civil War, when it fought the Confederate States Navy (CSN). The term is sometimes used carelessly to include vessels of war used on the rivers of the interior while they were under the control of the United States Army, also called the Union Army.

American Civil War Civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865

The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865, between the North and the South. The Civil War is the most studied and written about episode in U.S. history. Primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people, war broke out in April 1861 when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina shortly after Abraham Lincoln had been inaugurated as the President of the United States. The loyalists of the Union in the North proclaimed support for the Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States in the South, who advocated for states' rights to uphold slavery.

Contents

The tug Primrose, a wooden screw steamer, purchased as Nellie B. Vaughn 14 January 1863, at Washington, D.C., was renamed Primrose; fitted out at the Washington Navy Yard; and commissioned 26 February 1863, acting Master Street in command.

Washington, D.C. Capital of the United States

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States. Founded after the American Revolution as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, first President of the United States and Founding Father. As the seat of the United States federal government and several international organizations, Washington is an important world political capital. The city is also one of the most visited cities in the world, with more than 20 million tourists annually.

Washington Navy Yard former shipyard and ordnance plant of the United States Navy

The Washington Navy Yard (WNY) is the former shipyard and ordnance plant of the United States Navy in Southeast Washington, D.C. It is the oldest shore establishment of the U.S. Navy.

Assigned to the Potomac Flotilla

Assigned to the Potomac Flotilla for duty in the Potomac River and adjacent waters, Primrose participated in operations in the Nansemond River in April and in the Curritoman in May. On 2 June, with USS Anacostia, she took the sloop Flying Cloud at Tapp’s Creek, Virginia, then on the 20th captured the sloop Richard Vaux off Blakistone Island in the Potomac River.

Potomac Flotilla

The Potomac Flotilla, or the Potomac Squadron was a unit of the United States Navy created in the early days of the American Civil War to secure Union communications in the Chesapeake Bay, the Potomac River and their tributaries, and to disrupt Confederate communications and shipping in the same.

Potomac River river in the mid-Atlantic United States

The Potomac River is located within the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States and flows from the Potomac Highlands into the Chesapeake Bay. The river is approximately 405 miles (652 km) long, with a drainage area of about 14,700 square miles (38,000 km2). In terms of area, this makes the Potomac River the fourth largest river along the Atlantic coast of the United States and the 21st largest in the United States. Over 5 million people live within the Potomac watershed.

Nansemond River river in the United States of America

The Nansemond River is a 19.8-mile-long (31.9 km) tributary of the James River in Virginia in the United States. English settlers named the river for the Nansemond tribe of Native Americans, who then inhabited the area. The river begins at the outlet of Lake Meade north of downtown Suffolk, historically marking the northern boundary of the city. The Nansemond River Light once marked the river's confluence with the James.

Post-war activity and decommissioning

Laid up for repairs in February 1864, Primose returned to active duty in April, remaining with the Potomac River forces until 1866. Then assigned to the Washington Navy Yard, she remained active until 1871, when she was placed in ordinary. She was sold at Washington to J. W. Denty, 17 March 1871.

See also

United States Navy Naval warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Navy (USN) is the naval warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States. It is the largest and most capable navy in the world and it has been estimated that in terms of tonnage of its active battle fleet alone, it is larger than the next 13 navies combined, which includes 11 U.S. allies or partner nations. with the highest combined battle fleet tonnage and the world's largest aircraft carrier fleet, with eleven in service, and two new carriers under construction. With 319,421 personnel on active duty and 99,616 in the Ready Reserve, the Navy is the third largest of the service branches. It has 282 deployable combat vessels and more than 3,700 operational aircraft as of March 2018, making it the second-largest air force in the world, after the United States Air Force.

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References

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships .The entry can be found here.