USS Sarah and Caroline (1861)

Last updated
History
Naval ensign of the Confederate States of America (1863-1865).svgFlag of the United States (1865-1867).svgUnited States
Laid down: date unknown
Launched: date unknown
Acquired:
  • 1 August 1863
  • in New York City
In service: 1863 (est.)
Out of service: 1865 (est.)
Struck: 1865 (est.)
Homeport: Port Royal, South Carolina
Captured:
Fate:
General characteristics
Displacement: not known
Length: not known
Beam: not known
Draught: not known
Propulsion: schooner sail
Speed: not known
Complement: not known
Armament: not known

USS Sarah and Caroline (1861) was a schooner captured by the Union Navy during the beginning of the American Civil War.

A schooner is a type of sailing vessel with fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. The most common type has two masts, the foremast being shorter than the main. While the schooner was originally gaff-rigged, modern schooners typically carry a Bermuda rig.

Union Navy United States Navy during the American Civil War

The Union Navy was the United States Navy (USN) during the American Civil War, when it fought the Confederate States Navy (CSN). The term is sometimes used carelessly to include vessels of war used on the rivers of the interior while they were under the control of the United States Army, also called the Union Army.

American Civil War Civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865

The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865, between the North and the South. The Civil War is the most studied and written about episode in U.S. history. Primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people, war broke out in April 1861 when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina shortly after Abraham Lincoln had been inaugurated as the President of the United States. The loyalists of the Union in the North proclaimed support for the Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States in the South, who advocated for states' rights to uphold slavery.

Contents

She served the Union Navy during the blockade of ports and waterways of the Confederate States of America as a ship's tender.

Confederate States of America (de facto) federal republic in North America from 1861 to 1865

The Confederate States of America, commonly referred to as the Confederacy and the South, was an unrecognized country in North America that existed from 1861 to 1865. The Confederacy was originally formed by seven secessionist slave-holding states—South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas—in the Lower South region of the United States, whose economy was heavily dependent upon agriculture, particularly cotton, and a plantation system that relied upon the labor of African-American slaves.

Ships tender boat used to service a ship

A ship's tender, usually referred to as a tender, is a boat, or a larger ship used to service or support other boats or ships, generally by transporting people or supplies to and from shore or another ship. Smaller boats may also have tenders, usually called dinghies.

Captured by the Union Navy

While on blockade duty on the afternoon of 11 December 1861, Union side wheel steamer, USS Bienville, sighted two sails and immediately gave chase. She succeeded in driving one ship aground in the breakers at the mouth of the St. Johns River, and she captured the other, a small pilot-boat schooner, named Sarah and Caroline.

St. Johns River river in Florida

The St. Johns River is the longest river in the U.S. state of Florida and its most significant one for commercial and recreational use. At 310 miles (500 km) long, it flows north and winds through or borders twelve counties. The drop in elevation from headwaters to mouth is less than 30 feet (9 m); like most Florida waterways, the St. Johns has a very low flow rate 0.3 mph (0.13 m/s) and is often described as "lazy". Numerous lakes are formed by the river or flow into it, but as a river its widest point is nearly 3 miles (5 km) across. The narrowest point is in the headwaters, an unnavigable marsh in Indian River County. The St. Johns drainage basin of 8,840 square miles (22,900 km2) includes some of Florida's major wetlands. It is separated into three major basins and two associated watersheds for Lake George and the Ocklawaha River, all managed by the St. Johns River Water Management District.

The prize had slipped out of Jacksonville, Florida, and was bound for Nassau, New Providence, in the Bahamas, carrying 60 barrels of turpentine. The dangers of the Atlantic Ocean in winter precluded sending the frail schooner north for adjudication, so she was kept at Port Royal, South Carolina.

Jacksonville, Florida Largest city in Florida

Jacksonville is the most populous city in Florida, the most populous city in the southeastern United States and the largest city by area in the contiguous United States. It is the seat of Duval County, with which the city government consolidated in 1968. Consolidation gave Jacksonville its great size and placed most of its metropolitan population within the city limits. As of 2017 Jacksonville's population was estimated to be 892,062. The Jacksonville metropolitan area has a population of 1,523,615 and is the fourth largest in Florida.

Nassau, Bahamas Place in New Providence, Bahamas

Nassau is the capital and commercial centre of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The city has an estimated population of 274,400 as of 2016, just over 70% of the population of the country (≈391,000). Lynden Pindling International Airport, the major airport for the Bahamas, is located about 16 kilometres (9.9 mi) west of Nassau city centre, and has daily flights to major cities in Canada, the Caribbean, the United Kingdom and the United States. The city is located on the island of New Providence, which functions much like a business district. Nassau is the site of the House of Assembly and various judicial departments and was considered historically to be a stronghold of pirates. The city was named in honour of William III of England, Prince of Orange-Nassau, deriving its name from Nassau, Germany.

Turpentine natural resin obtained from live trees, mainly pines

Turpentine is a fluid obtained by the distillation of resin from live trees, mainly pines. It is mainly used as a solvent and as a source of materials for organic synthesis.

Civil War service

Although no record of her service has been found, Sarah and Caroline apparently served the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron as a ship's tender. In any case, she was purchased by the Navy from the New York City prize court on 1 August 1863.

Prize court

A prize court is a court authorized to consider whether prizes have been lawfully captured, typically whether a ship has been lawfully captured or seized in time of war or under the terms of the seizing ship's letters of marque and reprisal. A prize court may order the sale or destruction of the seized ship, and the distribution of any proceeds to the captain and crew of the seizing ship. A prize court may also order the return of a seized ship to its owners if the seizure was unlawful, such as if seized from a country which had proclaimed its neutrality.

Post-war deactivation

After the Civil War ended, she was sold at Port Royal on 8 August 1865.

See also

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References

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships .The entry can be found here.