USS Schuyler (AK-209)

Last updated
History
US flag 48 stars.svgUnited States
NameSchuyler
Namesake
Orderedas type (C1-M-AV1) hull, MC hull 2163 [1]
Builder Leathem D. Smith Shipbuilding Company, Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin
Yard number329 [1]
Laid down27 May 1944
Sponsored byMiss Marilyn Hughes
Acquired20 June 1945
Commissioned13 July 1945
Decommissioned27 March 1946
Stricken5 June 1946
Identification
Fatereturned to the Maritime Commission, 10 December 1954, for lay up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet, Olympia, Washington
Statussold to Zidell Corp. for scrapping, 5 February 1971
General characteristics [2]
Class and type Alamosa-class cargo ship
Type C1-M-AV1
Tonnage5,032 long tons deadweight (DWT) [1]
Displacement
  • 2,382 long tons (2,420 t) (standard)
  • 7,450 long tons (7,570 t) (full load)
Length388 ft 8 in (118.47 m)
Beam50 ft (15 m)
Draft21 ft 1 in (6.43 m)
Installed power
Propulsion1 × propeller
Speed11.5  kn (21.3 km/h; 13.2 mph)
Capacity
  • 3,945 t (3,883 long tons) DWT
  • 9,830 cu ft (278 m3) (refrigerated)
  • 227,730 cu ft (6,449 m3) (non-refrigerated)
Complement
  • 15 Officers
  • 70 Enlisted
Armament

USS Schuyler (AK-209) was an Alamosa-class cargo ship that was constructed for the US Navy during the closing period of World War II. She served with distinction in the Pacific Ocean theatre of operations and returned home in 1946 to be placed into the reserve "mothball" fleet where she silently remained until she was scrapped in 1971.

Contents

Construction

Schuyler was laid down under US Maritime Commission (MARCOM) contract, MC hull 2163, on 27 May 1944, by Leathem D. Smith Shipbuilding Company, Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin; sponsored by Miss Marilyn Hughes; acquired by the Navy on 20 June 1945; and commissioned on 13 July 1945, at Galveston, Texas, Lieutenant B. G. Fold, USNR, in command. [3]

Service history

World War II service

Schuyler loaded cargo at Gulfport, Mississippi, and Mobile, Alabama, and sailed from the latter port on 9 August 1945 for the Pacific Ocean. She arrived at Leyte on 28 September; but, due to the end of the war, neither the cargo nor the ship was required there. She remained in the Philippine Islands until the cargo was purchased by the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration for distribution in China. [3]

The ship then proceeded to Shanghai and discharged her cargo there between 18 January and 22 March. She arrived at Yokosuka on 27 March, was decommissioned and simultaneously returned to the War Shipping Administration (WSA) on 22 April 1946, and struck from the Navy List on 5 June 1946. [3]

Post-war inactivation

After service under charter to the Japanese government, the ship was laid up on 10 December 1954 in the National Defense Reserve Fleet at Olympia, Washington, where she remained until sold on 5 February 1971, for $34,385 and scrapping. [3] [4]

Notes

    Citations
    1. 1 2 3 C1 Cargo Ships 2009.
    2. Navsource 2014.
    3. 1 2 3 4 DANFS 2015.
    4. MARAD.

    Bibliography

    Online resources


    Related Research Articles

    USS <i>Arided</i>

    USS Arided (AK-73), a Crater-class cargo ship, is the only ship of the US Navy to have this name. She was named after Arided, the other name of Deneb, the alpha star of constellation Cygnus.

    USS <i>Crater</i> (AK-70)

    USS Crater (AK-70) was the lead ship of her class of converted liberty ship cargo ships in the service of the US Navy in World War II. She was first named after John James Audubon, an American ornithologist, naturalist, and painter. She was renamed and commissioned after the constellation Crater, she was the only ship of the Navy to bear this name.

    USS <i>Adhara</i>

    USS Adhara (AK-71) was a Crater-class cargo ship in the service of the US Navy in the Pacific theater in World War II. Named after the star Adhara in the constellation Canis Major, it was the only ship of the Navy to bear this name.

    USS <i>Alnitah</i>

    The USS Alnitah (AK-127) was a Crater-class cargo ship in the service of the US Navy in World War II. Named a spelling variation of the star Alnitak in the constellation Orion, it was the only ship of the Navy to bear this name.

    USS <i>Sculptor</i> (AK-103)

    USS Sculptor (AK-103) was an Crater-class cargo ship commissioned by the US Navy for service in World War II. Sculptor was named after the constellation Sculptor. She was responsible for delivering troops, goods and equipment to locations in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

    USS <i>Caelum</i> (AK-106)

    USS Caelum (AK-106) was a Crater-class cargo ship commissioned by the US Navy for service in World War II. Caelum was named after the constellation Caelum. She was responsible for delivering troops, goods and equipment to locations in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

    USS <i>Alkes</i>

    USS Alkes (AK-110) was an Crater-class cargo ship commissioned by the US Navy for service in World War II, named after Alkes, a star in the Crater constellation. She was responsible for delivering troops, goods and equipment to locations in the war zone.

    USS Alkaid (AK-114) was a Crater-class cargo ship, converted from a Liberty Ship, commissioned by the US Navy for service in World War II. She was first named after William G. Sumner, a classical liberal American social scientist. She was renamed and commissioned after Alkaid, a star in the Big Dipper asterism or constellation Ursa Major. She was responsible for delivering troops, goods and equipment to locations in the war zone.

    USS <i>Arkab</i>

    USS Arkab (AK-130) was a Crater-class cargo ship commissioned by the U.S. Navy for service in World War II, named after Arkab, the star in constellation Sagittarius. She was responsible for delivering troops, goods and equipment to locations in the war zone.

    USS <i>Nicollet</i> (AVS-6)

    USS Nicollet (AK-199/AG-93/AVS-6) was an Alamosa-class cargo ship acquired by the U.S. Navy shortly before the end of World War II. She was converted into a Gwinnett-class aviation stores issue ship to carry aviation parts and spares, and to issue them to the US Pacific Fleet and activities as needed.

    USS Somerset (AK-212) was an Alamosa-class cargo ship that was constructed for the US Navy during the closing period of World War II. She was later acquired by the US Army in 1946 and the US Air Force in 1957 before being reacquired by the USN as the USNS Coastal Sentry (T-AGM-15), a missile range instrumentation ship.

    USNS <i>Coastal Crusader</i> (T-AGM-16)

    USNS Coastal Crusader (AK-220/ORV-16/T-AGM-16/AGS-36) was an Alamosa-class cargo ship that was constructed for the US Navy during the closing period of World War II. She was later acquired by the US Army in 1946 and the US Air Force in 1957 before being reacquired by the USN in 1964 and as a missile range instrumentation ship.

    USS <i>Poinsett</i> (AK-205)

    USS Poinsett (AK-205) was an Alamosa-class cargo ship acquired by the US Navy just prior to the end of World War II. She carried supplies and ammunition to the Pacific Ocean battle areas and was awarded one battle star for her operations in the Borneo area.

    USS <i>Faribault</i> (AK-179)

    USS Faribault (AK-179) was an Alamosa-class cargo ship acquired by the U.S. Navy during the final months of World War II. Faribault served US military forces in the Pacific Ocean until shortly after the war when she was deactivated. During the Korean War, she was reactivated and served with distinction, having been awarded two battle stars before final decommissioning.

    USS Muscatine (AK-197) was an Alamosa-class cargo ship that was constructed for the US Navy under a US Maritime Commission contract during the closing period of World War II. She had a brief and successful career before being decommissioned a year later.

    USS <i>Pembina</i> (AK-200)

    USS Pembina (AK-200) – later known as USNS Pembina (T-AK-200) -- was an Alamosa-class cargo ship that was constructed for the U.S. Navy during the closing period of World War II. She supported the end-of-war Navy effort and was subsequently placed in service with the US Army under the Shipping Control Authority for the Japanese Merchant Marine with a Japanese crew in Yokosuka, Japan.

    USS Rockdale (AK-208) was an Alamosa-class cargo ship that was constructed for the US Navy during the closing period of World War II. She served with distinction in the Pacific Ocean theatre of operations and returned home in 1946 to be placed into the "mothball" fleet and sold in 1947.

    USS <i>Screven</i> (AK-210)

    USS Screven (AK-210) was an Alamosa-class cargo ship that was constructed for the US Navy during the closing period of World War II. She served in the Pacific Ocean theatre of operations and returned home in 1946 to be placed into the "mothball fleet" where she remained until sold in 1947 for commercial maritime service.

    USS <i>Sussex</i> (AK-213)

    USS Sussex (AK-213) was an Alamosa-class cargo ship that was constructed for the US Navy during the closing period of World War II. She was retained by the Navy for post-war service, including that in the Korean War theatre where she earned three battle stars and then returned home for deactivation.

    USS Tipton (AK-215) was an Alamosa-class cargo ship that was constructed for the US Navy during the closing period of World War II. She was commissioned; however, the war ended and she was declared "excess to needs." She was then transferred to the US Coast Guard in 1946.