USS Sea Foam (IX-210)

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USS Sea Foam (IX-210)
History
US flag 48 stars.svgUnited States
Name: USS Sea Foam
Builder: Fore River Shipbuilding Corporation
Commissioned: 15 May 1945
Decommissioned: 24 December 1946
In service: 1917
Out of service: 1946
Fate: scrapped 1947
General characteristics
Displacement: 6,666 tons (Full)
Length: 431 feet, 6 inches
Beam: 56 feet
Propulsion:
  • one vertical triple expansion steam engine
  • three single end Scotch boilers, 220psi Sat°
  • single propeller, 3,000shp
Speed: 10+ knots
Armament:
  • one 5" gun mount
  • one 3"/50 gun mount
  • eight 20mm guns

USS Sea Foam (IX-210) was a Mobile Floating Storage Tanker of the United States Navy in the closing stages of World War II. Sea Foam was built as the SS Pennsylvania -- an Emergency Fleet Corporation Design 1045 tanker in Quincy, Massachusetts, in 1917 for World War I civilian merchant service. [1]

Contents

World War II

During most of World War II, the Pennsylvania operated as a merchant tanker. She was allocated to the Navy while undergoing repairs at Northwestern Iron Works in Portland, Oregon, in February 1945. Commissioned as Sea Foam at Pearl Harbor on 15 May 1945, Lt. Wesley W. Beck in command, the tanker remained there until 23 June while further repairs were being made. On 24 June, Sea Foam, along with YOG-57 and PC-1569, left Pearl Harbor and proceeded to Eniwetok via the Johnston Islands, arriving on 8 July. From 9 July to 6 September, Sea Foam was engaged in routine duty fueling vessels in the harbor at Eniwetok. She departed Eniwetok on the 7th for Tokyo Bay, anchoring there on the 21st. She fueled vessels in Tokyo Bay until 31 October 1945. [2]

Post war

Sea Foam departed Asian waters on 1 November and headed for the Panama Canal. She arrived in Mobile, Alabama, on 24 December, where she was decommissioned and redelivered to the War Shipping Administration on 8 February 1946. Struck from the Naval Register on 26 February, Sea Foam was sold to the H. H. Buncher Co. on 9 July 1947 for $14,010.00. [3]

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