UTC−12:00

Last updated

UTC−12:00
Time zone
Timezones2008 UTC-12 gray.png
World map with the time zone highlighted
UTC offset
UTCUTC−12:00
Current time
00:07, 10 September 2021 UTC−12:00 [refresh]
Central meridian
180 degrees
Date-time group
Y
UTC-12:00: blue (December), orange (June), yellow (year-round), light blue (sea areas) Timezones2008 UTC-12.png
UTC−12:00: blue (December), orange (June), yellow (year-round), light blue (sea areas)

UTC−12:00 is an identifier for a time offset from UTC of −12:00. It is the last to enter a new year, and is sometimes referred to as the International Date Line West time zone (IDLW). [1]

Contents

As standard time (year-round)

Oceania

UTC−12:00 is a nautical time zone comprising the high seas between 180° and 172°30′W longitude, and the time is obtained by subtracting twelve hours from UTC.

Characteristics of UTC−12:00

A number of inhabited territories lie within the longitudinal limits of this time zone (Tonga, Wallis and Futuna and Chatham Islands as well as parts of Chukotka Autonomous Okrug of Russia, the US state of Alaska, Fiji, Tokelau and Samoa) but none of them keeps the date and time of UTC−12:00. Instead, they keep the time and date (or just the date) of one of the neighboring zones, usually because they belong, politically, to a country which lies mostly in the neighboring time zone.

Since the International Date Line West (IDLW) time zone represents the last place on Earth where a particular time and/or date exists, it is referred to as Anywhere on Earth (AoE). A deadline specified as "Anywhere on Earth" has not passed if, anywhere on Earth, the deadline has not passed, or, equivalently, if the deadline has not passed in the UTC–12:00 zone. [1]

The IDLW is also used in software testing for time zone related code that uses system default time zone, as in some cases they may be the same as on the developer's computer.[ citation needed ] Since the area of the IDLW has no programmers or data centers, there is no conflict.

See also

Related Research Articles

Baker Island Uninhabited Pacific atoll

Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean about 3,090 km (1,920 mi) southwest of Honolulu City. The island lies almost halfway between Hawaii and Australia. Its nearest neighbor is Howland Island, 42 mi (68 km) to the north-northwest; both have been claimed as territories of the United States since 1857, though the United Kingdom considered them part of the British Empire between 1897 and 1936.

Greenwich Mean Time Time zone of western Europe, same as WET

Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) is the mean solar time at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London, counted from midnight. At different times in the past, it has been calculated in different ways, including being calculated from noon; as a consequence, it cannot be used to specify a particular time unless a context is given. The term 'GMT' is also used as one of the names for the time zone UTC+00:00.

Howland Island United States Minor Outlying Islands

Howland Island is an uninhabited coral island located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean, about 1,700 nautical miles (3,100 km) southwest of Honolulu. The island lies almost halfway between Hawaii and Australia and is an unorganized, unincorporated territory of the United States. Together with Baker Island it forms part of the Phoenix Islands. For statistical purposes, Howland is grouped as one of the United States Minor Outlying Islands. The island has an elongated cucumber-shape on a north–south axis, 1.40 by 0.55 nautical miles, and covers 2.6 square kilometres.

Line Islands Chain of eleven atolls and low coral islands in the central Pacific Ocean

The Line Islands, Teraina Islands or Equatorial Islands are a chain of 11 atolls and coral islands in the central Pacific Ocean, south of the Hawaiian Islands. The island chain stretches northwest to southeast across 2,350 kilometres, making it one of the longest island chains in the world. One of the islands in the group, Kiritimati, has the largest land area of any atoll in the world. Of the 11 islands, all of which were formed by volcanic activity, only the Kiritimati and Tabuaeran atolls and Teraina Island have a permanent population. Eight of the islands are part of Kiribati. The remaining three—Kingman Reef, Palmyra Island and Jarvis Island—are United States territories grouped with the United States Minor Outlying Islands.

Time zone Area that observes a uniform standard time


A time zone is an area that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial and social purposes. Time zones tend to follow the boundaries between countries and their subdivisions instead of strictly following longitude, because it is convenient for areas in frequent communication to keep the same time.

International Date Line Imaginary line that demarcates the change of one calendar day to the next

The International Date Line (IDL) is an internationally accepted demarcation on the surface of Earth, running between the North Pole and South Pole and serving as the boundary between one calendar day and the next. It passes through the Pacific Ocean, roughly following the 180° line of longitude and deviating to pass around some territories and island groups.

Central European Time Standard time (UTC+01:00)

Central European Time (CET) is a standard time which is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). The time offset from UTC can be written as UTC+01:00. It is used in most parts of Europe and in a few North African countries. CET is also known as Middle European Time and by colloquial names such as Amsterdam Time, Berlin Time, Brussels Time, Madrid Time, Paris Time, Rome Time, and Warsaw Time.

Time in the United States U.S. time zones

Time in the United States, by law, is divided into nine standard time zones covering the states, territories and other US possessions, with most of the United States observing daylight saving time (DST) for approximately the spring, summer, and fall months. The time zone boundaries and DST observance are regulated by the Department of Transportation. Official and highly precise timekeeping services (clocks) are provided by two federal agencies: the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) ; and the United States Naval Observatory (USNO). The clocks run by these services are kept synchronized with each other as well as with those of other international timekeeping organizations.

Atlantic Time Zone Time zone (UTC−04:00)

The Atlantic Time Zone is a geographical region that keeps standard time—called Atlantic Standard Time (AST)—by subtracting four hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), resulting in UTC−04:00. During part of the year, some portions of the zone observe daylight saving time, referred to as Atlantic Daylight Time (ADT), by moving their clocks forward one hour to result in UTC−03:00. The clock time in this zone is based on the mean solar time of the 60th meridian west of the Greenwich Observatory.

UTC−11:00 Identifier for a time offset from UTC of −11

UTC−11:00 is an identifier for a time offset from UTC of −11:00. This time is used in Niue, American Samoa, Swains Island, and parts of the United States Minor Outlying Islands. This is the latest inhabited time zone, meaning this is the last inhabited time zone to celebrate the New Year, as the world's latest time zone (UTC-12:00) is completely uninhabited.

UTC−10:00

UTC−10:00 is an identifier for a time offset from UTC of −10:00. This time is used in Hawaii, Alaska, French Polynesia, and the Cook Islands(CKT)

UTC+14:00

UTC+14:00 is an identifier for a time offset from UTC of +14:00. This is the earliest time zone on Earth, meaning that areas in this zone are the first to see a new day, and therefore the first to celebrate a New Year. It is also referred to as the "latest time zone" on Earth, as clocks in it always show the 'latest' time of all time zones.

Time in Brazil Overview of the time zones used in Brazil

Time in Brazil is calculated using standard time, and the country is divided into four standard time zones: UTC−02:00, UTC−03:00, UTC−04:00 and UTC−05:00.

Samoa Time Zone Time zone

The Samoa Time Zone or Samoa Standard Time (SST) observes standard time by subtracting eleven hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC-11:00). The clock time in this zone is based on the mean solar time of the 165th meridian west of the Greenwich Observatory.

Chamorro Time Zone Time zone for Guam and Northern Mariana Islands

The Chamorro Time Zone, formerly the Guam Time Zone, is a United States time zone which observes standard time ten hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC+10:00). The clock time in this zone is based on the mean solar time of the 150th meridian east of the Greenwich Observatory.

Howland and Baker Islands Unincorporated U.S. territory

Howland Island and Baker Island are two uninhabited U.S. atolls in the Equatorial Pacific that are located close to one another. Both islands are wildlife refuges, the larger of which is Howland Island. They are both part of the larger political territory of the United States Minor Outlying Islands and they are also both part of the larger geographic grouping of the Phoenix Islands. Each is a National Wildlife Refuge managed by a division of Interior, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. On January 6, 2009, President George Bush, included both islands to the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.

Anywhere on Earth Calendar designation

Anywhere on Earth (AoE) is a calendar designation which indicates that a period expires when the date passes everywhere on Earth. The last place on Earth where any date exists is on Howland and Baker Islands, in the IDLW time zone, and so is the last spot on the globe for any day to exist. Therefore, the day ends AoE when it ends on Howland Island.

Coordinated Universal Time Primary time standard

Coordinated Universal Time or UTC is the primary time standard by which the world regulates clocks and time. It is within about 1 second of mean solar time at 0° longitude and is not adjusted for daylight saving time. It is effectively a successor to Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

Time in the Danish Realm Time zones of Denmark and its dependencies

Denmark, including the dependencies Faroe Islands and Greenland, uses six time zones.

References

  1. 1 2 "IEEE 802.16 AOE Deadline Documentation". IEEE 802 LAN/MAN Standards Committee. Retrieved 1 January 2018.