U language

Last updated
U
Pouma
Region China
Native speakers
40,000 (2000) [1]
Language codes
ISO 639-3 uuu
Glottolog uuuu1243
ELP U

The U language or P'uman (Chinese :濮满), is spoken by 40,000 people in the Yunnan Province of China and possibly Myanmar. It is classified as an Austroasiatic language in the Palaungic branch. In China, U speakers are classified as ethnic Bulang.

Contents

Locations

U is spoken in Shuangjiang County of Yunnan and other nearby counties. [2]

There 2 main dialects of U in Shuangjiang County: one spoken in Gongnong 公弄 (now part of Mengku Town, 勐库镇) and one spoken in Bangbing 邦丙 and Dawen Mangga 大文乡忙嘎; the Dawen dialect is reportedly mutually intelligible with that of Shidian County (Shuangjiang County Ethnic Gazetteer 1995:160).

Avala (autonym: a21 va21 la21) is spoken in Bangliu 邦六, [7] Manghuai Township 芒怀乡, Yun County 云县, Yunnan, China. [8] [9]

Phonology

U has four tones, high, low, rising, falling, which developed from vowel length and the nature of final consonants.

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References

  1. U at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. Svantesson (1988)
  3. "Shuāng jiāng lāhù zú wǎzú bùlǎng zú dǎizú zìzhìxiàn dà wén xiāng dà liángzi cūn wěi huì pàng pǐn zìráncūn" 双江拉祜族佤族布朗族傣族自治县大文乡大梁子村委会胖品自然村. ynszxc.gov.cn (in Chinese). Archived from the original on 2014-04-07. Retrieved 2014-03-14.
  4. "Yǒng dé xiàn měng bǎn xiāng hù yā cūn wěi huì gān táng zìráncūn" 永德县勐板乡户丫村委会甘塘自然村. ynszxc.gov.cn (in Chinese). Archived from the original on 2016-03-05. Retrieved 2015-01-31.
  5. "Yǒng dé xiàn měng bǎn xiāng lí shù cūn wěi huì gān táng zìráncūn" 永德县勐板乡梨树村委会甘塘自然村. ynszxc.gov.cn (in Chinese). Archived from the original on 2016-03-05. Retrieved 2015-01-30.
  6. "Shuāng jiāng lāhù zú wǎzú bùlǎng zú dǎizú zìzhìxiàn shāhé xiāng bāng xié cūnmín wěiyuánhuì bāng xié zìráncūn" 双江拉祜族佤族布朗族傣族自治县沙河乡邦协村民委员会邦协自然村 (in Chinese). Archived from the original on 2014-02-22. Retrieved 2014-04-04.
  7. "Yún xiàn máng huái yízú bùlǎng zú xiāng bāng liù cūn wěi huì" 云县忙怀彝族布朗族乡邦六村委会 (in Chinese). Archived from the original on 2018-08-17. Retrieved 2021-02-22.
  8. Hsiu, Andrew (2017), "The Angkuic Languages: A Preliminary Survey", Presented at the 6th International Conference on Austroasiatic Linguistics (ICAAL 6), Siem Reap, Cambodia (Handout), Zenodo, doi: 10.5281/zenodo.1127808 , archived from the original on 2020-05-16
  9. Hsiu, Andrew (2017), "Avala Audio Word List", Zenodo, doi: 10.5281/zenodo.1123297 , archived from the original on 2020-10-09

Further reading

Gazetteers and other Chinese government sources with lexical data