U with macron (Cyrillic)

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Cyrillic letter
U with macron
Cyrillic letter U with Macron.svg
The Cyrillic script
Slavic letters
А Б В Г Ґ Д Ђ
Ѓ Е Ѐ Ё Є Ж З
З́ Ѕ И Ѝ Й І Ї
Ј К Л Љ М Н Њ
О Ō П Р С С́ Т
Ћ Ќ У Ӯ Ў Ф Х
Ц Ч Џ Ш Щ Ъ Ы
Ь Э Ю Я
Non-Slavic letters
А́ А̀ Ӑ А̄ А̊ А̃ Ӓ
Ӓ̄ Ӕ Ә Ә́ Ә̃ Ӛ В̌
Ғ Г̧ Г̑ Г̄ Г̣ Г̌ Ҕ
Ӻ Ғ̌ Ӷ Ԁ Ԃ
Д̆ Д̣ Ԫ Ԭ Д̆ Ӗ
Е̄ Е̃ Ё̄ Є̈ Ӂ Җ
Ӝ Ԅ Ҙ Ӟ З̌ З̱ З̣
Ԑ Ԑ̈ Ӡ Ԇ Ӣ И̃ Ҋ
Ӥ И́ Қ Ӄ Ҡ Ҟ Ҝ
Ԟ К̣ Ԛ Ӆ Ԯ Ԓ Ԡ
Ԉ Ԕ Ӎ Ӊ Ң Ԩ Ӈ
Ҥ Ԣ Ԋ О́ О̀ О̆ О̂
О̃ Ӧ Ӧ̄ Ө Ө̄ Ө́ Ө̆
Ӫ Ҩ Ԥ Ҧ Р̌ Ҏ Ԗ
Ҫ С̣ С̱ Ԍ Т̌ Т̣
Ҭ Ԏ У̃ Ӱ Ӱ́
Ӳ Ү Ү́ Ұ Х̣ Х̱ Х̮
Х̑ Ҳ Ӽ Ӿ Һ Һ̈ Ԧ
Ҵ Ҷ Ӵ Ӌ Ҹ
Ҽ Ҿ Ы̆ Ы̄
Ӹ Ҍ Э̆ Э̄ Э̇ Ӭ Ӭ́
Ӭ̄ Ю̆ Ю̈ Ю̈́ Ю̄ Я̆ Я̄
Я̈ Ԙ Ԝ Ӏ
Archaic letters
Ҁ Ѻ
ОУ Ѡ Ѽ Ѿ
Ѣ Ѥ Ѧ
Ѫ Ѩ Ѭ Ѯ
Ѱ Ѳ Ѵ Ѷ

U with macron ӯ; italics: Ӯ ӯ) is a letter of the Cyrillic script, [1] derived from the Cyrillic letter U у У у).

Contents

U with macron is used in the alphabet of the Tajik language, where it represents the close-mid central rounded vowel, /ɵ/. Accordingly, although the letter shape is a modification of У, the only aspect of the sound shared with /u/ is that both are relatively close, rounded vowels.

In 1937, it was also proposed for use in the Karelian Cyrillic alphabet to represent /y/, but was not adopted.

U with macron is used to represent long /u/ in Kildin Sami and Mansi, two Uralic languages spoken on the Kola peninsula (Kildin) and Western Siberia (Mansi). In these languages, length is distinctive, and macron is used to mark the long version of all the vowels.

U with macron is also used in the Aleut language (Bering dialect). [2] It is the thirty-sixth letter of the modern Aleut alphabet.

U with macron is also used in Carpatho-Rusyn, the only Slavic language to do so, its sound is close to /y/, or in some dialects, /u/. [3] [4]

Computing codes

Character information
PreviewӮӯ
Unicode nameCYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER
U WITH MACRON
CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER
U WITH MACRON
Encodingsdecimalhexdecimalhex
Unicode 1262U+04EE1263U+04EF
UTF-8 211 174D3 AE211 175D3 AF
Numeric character reference ӮӮӯӯ

See also

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Izhitsa is a letter of the early Cyrillic alphabet and several later alphabets, usually the last in the row. It originates from the Greek letter upsilon and was used in words and names derived from or via the Greek language, such as кѵрилъ or флаѵии. It represented the sounds or as normal letters и and в, respectively. The Glagolitic alphabet has a corresponding letter with the name izhitsa as well. Also, izhitsa in its standard form or, most often, in a tailed variant was a part of a digraph оѵ/оу representing sound. The digraph is known as Cyrillic "uk", and today's Cyrillic letter u originates from its simplified form.

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I with macron is a letter of the Cyrillic script. In the Tajik language, it represents a stressed close front unrounded vowel at the end of a word. In the Kildin Sami language on the Kola Peninsula and the Mansi language in western Siberia, it represents long. In those languages, vowel length is distinctive, and the macron marks the long version of vowels.

Cyrillic alphabets Related alphabets based on Cyrillic scripts

Numerous Cyrillic alphabets are based on the Cyrillic script. The early Cyrillic alphabet was developed in the First Bulgarian Empire during the 9th century AD at the Preslav Literary School by Saint Clement of Ohrid and Saint Naum and replaced the earlier Glagolitic script developed by the Byzantine theologians Cyril and Methodius. It is the basis of alphabets used in various languages, past and present, in parts of Southeastern Europe and Northern Eurasia, especially those of Slavic origin, and non-Slavic languages influenced by Russian. As of 2011, around 252 million people in Eurasia use it as the official alphabet for their national languages. About half of them are in Russia. Cyrillic is one of the most-used writing systems in the world.

The Karelian language is spoken in Russia, mostly in the Karelian Republic and in a small region just north of Tver, though most residents there were expelled in 1939. Karelian has seen numerous proposed and adopted alphabets over the centuries, both Latin and Cyrillic. In 2007, the current standardized Karelian alphabet was introduced and is used to write all varieties of Karelian, with the exception of Tver Karelian.

O with macron is a letter of the Cyrillic script. In all its forms it looks exactly like the Latin letter O with macron.

A with macron is a letter of the Cyrillic script. In all its forms it looks exactly like the Latin letter A with macron.

Ye with macron is a letter of the Cyrillic script. In all its forms it looks exactly like the Latin letter E with macron.

E with macron is a letter of the Cyrillic script.

Yu with macron is a letter of the Cyrillic script. Its ligature is derived from the Cyrillic letter Yu (Юю) by adding a hugižila (хугижила) on top.

Ya with macron is a letter of the Cyrillic script.

References

  1. "Cyrillic: Range: 0400–04FF" (PDF). The Unicode Standard, Version 6.0. 2010. p. 43. Retrieved 2011-05-15.
  2. Головко, Е. В. (1994). Словарь алеутско-русский и русско-алеутский (беринговский диалект)[Aleut-Russian and Russian-Aleut Dictionary (Bering dialect)]. p. 14. ISBN   5-09-002312-3.
  3. Кушницькый, Мигаль (May 1, 2020). "Carpatho-Rusyn phonetics. Ep#2 - і, ї, ӯ | Карпаторусинська фонетика. Другый епізод". YouTube.
  4. "ruegrammatica". rueportal.eu.