Ujukatā

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Translations of
Ujukatā
Englishrectitude,
straightness,
uprightness
Pali ujukatā
Glossary of Buddhism

Ujukatā (Pali) is a Buddhist term translated as "rectitude", and it is the basis for the following pair of mental factors within the Theravada Abhidharma teachings:

Contents

These two mental factors have the characteristic of uprightness of the mental body and consciousness, respectively.

Definition

Bhikkhu Bodhi states: [1]

Rectitude is straightness. The twofold rectitude has the characteristic of uprightness of the mental body and consciousness, respectively. Its function is to crush tortuousness of the mental body and consciousness, and its manifestation is non-crookedness. Its proximate cause is the mental body and consciousness. It should be regarded as opposed to hypocrisy and fraudulence, etc., which create crookedness in the mental body and consciousness.

Nina van Gorkom explains: [2]

According to the Dhammasangani (par 50, 51) this pair of cetasikas consists in straightness and rectitude, being without deflection, twist or crookedness.
The Atthasālinī (I, Book I, Part IV, Chapter I, 131) explains that uprightness of cetasikas and of citta crush crookedness and that they are the opponents of the corruptions, such as deception and craftiness, which cause crookedness in mental factors and consciousness.
Uprightness is the opponent of deception and craftiness.

See also

Related Research Articles

Vedanā is an ancient term traditionally translated as either "feeling" or "sensation." In general, vedanā refers to the pleasant, unpleasant and neutral sensations that occur when our internal sense organs come into contact with external sense objects and the associated consciousness. Vedanā is identified as valence or "hedonic tone" in psychology.

Saṃjñā is a Buddhist term that is typically translated as "perception" or "cognition." It can be defined as grasping at the distinguishing features or characteristics. Samjñā has multiple meanings depending on religions. Although Samjñā means the five aggregates in Buddhism, in Hinduism, it refers to art traditions and in Jainism, it points to recognition distinct from cognition.

Ekaggatā is a Pali Buddhist term, defined as tranquility of mind or one-pointedness.

Sparśa is a Sanskrit/Indian term that is translated as "contact", "touching", "sensation", "sense impression", etc. It is defined as the coming together of three factors: the sense organ, the sense object, and sense consciousness (vijnana). For example, contact (sparsha) is said to occur at the coming together of the eye organ, a visual object, and the visual sense consciousness.

Cetanā is a Buddhist term commonly translated as "volition", "intention", "directionality", etc. It can be defined as a mental factor that moves or urges the mind in a particular direction, toward a specific object or goal. Cetanā is identified within the Buddhist teachings as follows:

Mental factors, in Buddhism, are identified within the teachings of the Abhidhamma. They are defined as aspects of the mind that apprehend the quality of an object, and that have the ability to color the mind. Within the Abhidhamma, the mental factors are categorized as formations concurrent with mind. Alternate translations for mental factors include "mental states", "mental events", and "concomitants of consciousness".

Manasikara is a Buddhist term that is translated as "attention" or "ego-centric demanding". It is defined as the process of the mind fixating upon an object. Manasikara is identified within the Buddhist Abhidharma teachings as follows:

Adhimoksha is a Buddhist term that is translated as "interest", "intensified interest", or "decision". It is defined as holding onto a certain form object; its function is not to lose the object.

Jīvitindriya is a Buddhist term translated as "life faculty" or "vitality". Jīvitindriya is identified as one of the seven universal mental factors within the Theravada abhidharma teachings. In this context, jīvitindriya is defined as a mental factor that sustains the life of the citta (mind) and other mental factors it accompanies. The characteristic of jīvitindriya is said to be “ceaseless watching”.

Āhrīkya is a Buddhist term that is translated as "lack of shame", "lack of conscience", etc. In the Theravada tradition, ahirika is defined as the absence of disgust at physical or verbal misconduct. In the Mahayana tradition, āhrīkya is defined as not restraining from wrongdoing due to one's own conscience.

Anapatrapya is a Buddhist term that is translated as "lack of propriety", "disregard", etc. In the Theravada tradition, anottappa is defined as the absence of dread on account of misconduct. In the Mahayana tradition, anapatrapya is defined as engaging in non-virtue without inhibition on account of others.

Kaukritya is a Buddhist term that is translated as "regret", "worry", etc. In the Theravada tradition, kukkucca is defined as worry or remorse after having done wrong; it has the characteristic of regret. In the Mahayana tradition, kaukritya is defined as sadness because of mental displeasure with a former action.

Auddhatya is a Buddhist term that is translated as "excitement", "restlessness", etc. In the Theravada tradition, uddhacca is defined as a mental factor that is characterized by disquietude, like water whipped by the wind. In the Mahayana tradition, auddhatya is defined as a mental factor that causes our mind to fly off from an object and recollect something else.

Middha is a Buddhist term that is translated as "torpor", "drowsiness", "sleep", etc. In the Theravada tradition, middha is defined as a morbid state that is characterized by unwieldiness, lack of energy, and opposition to wholesome activity. In the Mahayana tradition, middha is defined as a mental factor that causes the mind to draw inward, lose discrimination between wholesome and unwholesome activities, and drop out of activities altogether.

Thīna is a Buddhist term that is translated as "sloth". Thīna is defined as sluggishness or dullness of mind, characterized by a lack of driving power. In the Theravada tradition, thīna is said to occur in conjunction with middha (torpor), which is defined as a morbid state that is characterized by unwieldiness, lack of energy, and opposition to wholesome activity. The two mental factors in conjunction are expressed as thīna-middha (sloth-torpor).

Tatramajjhattatā (Pali) is a Buddhist term that is translated as "equanimity", "neutrality of mind", etc. In the Theravada tradition, it is defined as a mental attitude of balance, detachment, and impartiality.

Lahutā (Pali) is a Buddhist term translated as "lightness", and it is the basis for the following pair of mental factors within the Theravada Abhidharma teachings:

Madutā (Pali) is a Buddhist term translated as "malleability", and it is the basis for the following pair of mental factors within the Theravada Abhidharma teachings:

Kammaññatā (Pali) is a Buddhist term translated as "wieldiness", and it is the basis for the following pair of mental factors within the Theravada Abhidharma teachings:

Pāguññatā (Pali) is a Buddhist term translated as "proficiency", and it is the basis for the following pair of mental factors within the Theravada Abhidharma teachings:

References

  1. Bhikkhu Bodhi 2012, Kindle Locations 2377-2380.
  2. van Gorkom 2010, p. 229.

Sources