Uke Clanton

Last updated
Uke Clanton
First baseman
Born:(1898-02-19)February 19, 1898
Powell, Missouri
Died: February 24, 1960(1960-02-24) (aged 62)
Antlers, Oklahoma
Batted: LeftThrew: Left
MLB debut
September 21, 1922, for the Cleveland Indians
Last MLB appearance
September 21, 1922, for the Cleveland Indians
MLB statistics
Games played 1
At bats 1
Hits 0
Teams
Uke Clanton (February 19, 1898 – February 24, 1960) was a Major League Baseball first baseman who played for one season. Nicknamed "Cat", he played for the Cleveland Indians for one game on September 21, 1922. Clanton was one of a group of players that Indians player-manager Tris Speaker sent in partway through the game on September 21, 1922 done as an opportunity for fans to see various minor league prospects. [1] 

Clanton died in an automobile accident in Antlers, Oklahoma.

Antlers, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

Antlers is a city in and the county seat of Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 2,453 at the 2010 census, a 3.9 percent decline from 2,552 in 2000. The town was named for a kind of tree that becomes festooned with antlers shed by deer, and is taken as a sign of the location of a spring frequented by deer.

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References

  1. Powers, Francis J. (September 22, 1922). "Texan Calls Upon Twenty-One Men". The Plain Dealer . p. 18.