Ukraine national football team

Last updated

Ukraine
Logo Federation Ukraine Football 2016.svg
Nickname(s) Zbirna
Збірна (The Team)
Синьо-жовті (The Blue and Yellow)
Association Ukrainian Association of Football (UAF)
Українська Асоціація Футболу
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Oleksandr Petrakov (interim)
Captain Andriy Yarmolenko
Most caps Anatoliy Tymoshchuk (144)
Top scorer Andriy Shevchenko (48)
Home stadium Various
FIFA code UKR
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First colours
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Second colours
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Third colours
FIFA ranking
Current 27 Decrease2.svg 2 (16 September 2021) [1]
Highest11 (February 2007)
Lowest132 (September 1993)
First international
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 1–3 Hungary  Flag of Hungary.svg
(Uzhhorod, Ukraine; 29 April 1992)
Biggest win
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 9–0 San Marino  Flag of San Marino.svg
(Lviv, Ukraine; 6 September 2013)
Biggest defeat
Flag of France.svg  France 7–1 Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svg
(Saint-Denis, France; 7 October 2020)
World Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2006 )
Best resultQuarter-finals (2006)
European Championship
Appearances3 (first in 2012 )
Best resultQuarter-finals (2020)

The Ukraine national football team (Ukrainian : збірна України з футболу) represents Ukraine in men's international football competitions and it is governed by the Ukrainian Association of Football, the governing body for football in Ukraine. Ukraine's home ground is the Olimpiyskiy Stadium in Kyiv. The team has been a full member of UEFA and FIFA since 1992.

Contents

After Ukrainian Independence and the country's breakaway from the Soviet Union, they played their first match against Hungary on 29 April 1992. The team's biggest success on the world stage was reaching the quarter-finals in the 2006 FIFA World Cup, which also marked the team's debut in the finals of a major championship. [2]

As the host nation, Ukraine automatically qualified for UEFA Euro 2012. [2] Four years later, Ukraine qualified for Euro 2016 via the play-off route, the first time qualifying for a UEFA European Championship via the qualifying process, as they finished in third place in their qualifying group. This marked the first time in Ukraine's six play-off appearances that it managed to win such a tie, previously having been unsuccessful in the play-off ties for the 1998 World Cup, Euro 2000, 2002 World Cup, 2010 World Cup and 2014 World Cup.

Ukraine is seen as a specific case of being a successful youth football power in Europe and the world, yet fails to deliver the same taste at senior stage. The U-20 team of Ukraine has been the current reigning world champions at the FIFA U-20 World Cup, while the U-21 team had won silver medal in the 2006 UEFA European Under-21 Championship; however in spite of this rich record in youth stage, the senior side didn't have the same level of achievement to look back at. While the Ukrainian senior side managed to reach the quarter-finals of the 2006 World Cup, the team failed to enter the knockout stages in Euro 2012 and Euro 2016, and have never returned to the World Cup since.

Ukraine's best performance in the UEFA European Championship, was in the 2020 edition, having reached the quarter finals for the first time before their run was stopped by England with a 4–0 defeat on 3 July 2021 in the quarterfinals.

History

Ukrainian SSR (1925–1990)

Officially the national team of Ukraine, the national team was formed in the early 1990s and shortly after was recognized internationally. It is not widely known, however, that Ukraine previously had a national team in 1925–1935. [3] [4] Just like the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic had its own national team.

The earliest record of games it played can be traced back to August 1928. A championship among the national teams of the Soviet republics as well as the Moscow city team was planned to take place in Moscow. Just before the tournament started, the Ukraine national team played two exhibition games against the Red Sports Federation team from Uruguay, one in Kharkiv (lost 1–2) and the other in Moscow (won 3–2). At the All-Soviet tournament, Ukraine played three games and reached the final where it lost to Moscow 0–1. Along the way, Ukraine managed to defeat the national teams of Belarus and Transcaucasus.

In 1929, Ukraine beat the team of Lower Austria in an exhibition match in Kharkiv, recording a score of 4–1.

In 1931, Ukraine participated in another All-Soviet championship in Moscow. It played only one game, starting from the semifinals. Ukraine lost to the national team of Transcaucasus 0–3 and was eliminated.

In 1986, Ukraine became a winner of association football tournament of the Spartakiad of Peoples of the USSR that was hosted in Ukraine when in final it beat the team of Uzbekistan (Uzbek SSR).

Official formation

Prior to Independence in 1991, Ukrainian players represented the Soviet Union national team. After the collapse of the USSR in 1991, Russia took the place of the Soviet Union national team in the qualifying tournament for the 1994 World Cup. The national team of Ukraine did not manage to enter the 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification (the draw for the qualification stage was held on 8 December 1991, [5] before Ukraine was admitted to FIFA). Meanwhile, some of the best Ukrainian players of the beginning of the 1990s (including Andrei Kanchelskis, Viktor Onopko, Sergei Yuran, Yuriy Nikiforov, Ilya Tsymbalar and Oleg Salenko) chose to play for Russia, as it was named the official successor of the Soviet Union. [6] At that time Vyacheslav Koloskov was the only top official from the former Soviet Union and later the Russia who served as a vice-president of UEFA in 1980–1996 and represented all of members of the Soviet Union and later the Commonwealth of Independent States.

Valeriy Lobanovskyi, was Head Coach of the National Team in 1979 and between 2001 and 2002 Valeri Lobanovsky.jpg
Valeriy Lobanovskyi, was Head Coach of the National Team in 1979 and between 2001 and 2002

The Soviet Union's five-year UEFA coefficient, despite being earned in part by Ukrainian players (for example, in the final of the last successful event, Euro 1988, under the direction of Valery Lobanovsky, 7 out of starting 11 players were Ukrainians [7] ), were transferred to the direct descendant of the Soviet national team – the Russia national team. As a result, a crisis was created for both the national team and the domestic league. When Ukraine returned to international football in late 1994, it did so as absolute beginners.

Another reason for the occurred harsh crisis in the Ukrainian football was lack of adequate funding of teams. [6] This is understandable in terms of the general economic crisis that has affected all of the CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States) countries. [6] Yet even in contrast with Russia, the Ukrainian teams looked very poor. [6] However, there also was a reverse influx of some top class players. [6] Viktor Leonenko agreed on transfer from Dynamo Moscow to Dynamo Kyiv. [6] The Russian club did not want to release him, but Leonenko did not want to continue to play in Moscow. [6] During his first six months in Kyiv Viktor was forced to miss due to the FIFA disqualification. [6]

In the following years, the Ukrainian team improved, showcasing talents like Andriy Shevchenko, Anatoliy Tymoshchuk, Serhiy Rebrov and Oleksandr Shovkovskyi. Ukraine, however, failed to qualify for any major tournaments prior to 2006.

First official games (Prokopenko)

Soon after being accepted to FIFA and UEFA as a full member in 1992, Ukraine started its preparation for its first game. At first the head coach of the team was planned to be Valeriy Lobanovskyi, but at that time he had a current contract with the United Arab Emirates. Thus, the first manager of the team had to be chosen among members of a coaching council which consisted of Anatoliy Puzach (manager of Dynamo Kyiv), Yevhen Kucherevskyi (FC Dnipro), Yevhen Lemeshko (Torpedo Zaporizhzhia), Yukhym Shkolnykov (Bukovyna Chernivtsi) and Viktor Prokopenko (Chornomorets Odesa). Later, they were joined by a native of Donetsk Valeriy Yaremchenko (Shakhtar Donetsk). At the last stage, the circle was narrowed to three specialists. Puzach, Yaremchenko and Prokopenko took the team to Uzhhorod. The last of them, by agreement between the coaches themselves, became the main one. [8]

Viktor Prokopenko, the first manager of the national team Nastia Fedorenko. Donetsk. Uvidet' i poliubit'. FK Shakhter 051.jpg
Viktor Prokopenko, the first manager of the national team

For the first game of the team it was agreed to play against Hungary on 22 April 1992 in Kyiv at the Republican Stadium. Due to financial issues, however, it was rearranged to 29 April and moved to the border with Hungary in Uzhhorod at the Avanhard Stadium. There was almost no preparation to the game as all "pioneers" gathered in Kyiv on 27 April and the next day flew out to Uzhhorod. At the same time, the opponent, while failing to qualify for the Euro 1992, was preparing for 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification. Ukraine at that time failed to be accepted for the qualification cycle.

Unlike the Hungarian squad, players of which played alongside before and were coached by the European Cup-winning coach Emerich Jenei, the Ukrainian team lost some its better and experienced players to the CIS national football team that was playing its own friendly against the England national football team in Moscow. [9] Among those were Andrei Kanchelskis, Volodymyr Lyutyi, Sergei Yuran, Viktor Onopko, Oleksiy Mykhaylychenko and Akhrik Tsveiba (the last two would later represent Ukraine). For the game against Hungary, only Ivan Hetsko and Oleh Luzhny had previous experience of playing at international level; other players had only played for the Soviet Olympic football team, while Serhiy Kovalets played for Ukraine at the Spartakiad of People of the USSR in 1986.

The first home game was lost 1–3 with Ivan Hetsko becoming the first goalscorer in the history of national team. During the summer of 1992 Prokopenko's team played two more away games on 27 June against the United States (0-0) and on 26 August against Hungary (1-2). After the second loss to Hungary Prokopenko resigned. Leading in its game against Hungary, Ukraine conceded two goals in the final 10 minutes.

To the scheduled against Belarus in Minsk in the fall, Ukraine had left with Prokopenko's assistants Mykola Pavlov and Leonid Tkachenko. At the Dinamo Stadium, Ukraine managed to salvage a game by tying one a piece with a goal from Yuriy Maksymov.

Euro 96 qualification (Bazylevych)

Ukraine, having already suffered from a lack of good players, lost two promising young players during the winter intermission : Stepan Betsa and Oleksiy Sasko, who perished in a car accident. Unable to secure a contract with Valeriy Lobanovskyi, Ukraine appointed another head coach, former forward of Dynamo Kyiv Oleh Bazylevych. He made his debut with the national team in the spring of 1993 in Odessa during a friendly against Israel. Their expected win was cancelled out in a 1–1 draw just 10 minutes before the end by Serhiy Konovalov. Less than a month later Ukraine finally celebrated its first victory in Vilnius in an away friendly against Lithuania that resulted in a 1–2 win (goals scored by Viktor Leonenko and Dmytro Mykhaylenko). During the summer they played one away game against Croatia, losing 3–1, with a goal scored Andriy Husin and one of the Croatian goals scored by Davor Šuker. In October 1993, Ukraine went on their first tour to the United States where they played three games against the US and Mexico. Their game against Mexico in San Diego, resulting in a 1–2 loss, was attended by over 50,000 spectators. During the winter break Ukraine was seeded in Group 4 of the UEFA Euro 1996 qualification.

In March 1994, Ukraine paid Israel a visit, but lost the game with a single penalty kick. Next there was a home game against Belarus where Ukraine finally won 3-1 after coming from behind at half-time. Just before their first official international competition game which was scheduled to be played against Lithuania at home, they played couple of away games against Bulgaria and the United Arab Emirates which both ended in a 1–1 draw. Another tour was scheduled right afterwards to Lithuania and Korea, the national coached by Kyivan Anatoliy Byshovets. The opening game on 7 September against Lithuania, considering their last encounter, was expected to end positively, which however resulted in a 0–2 defeat. [10] Both goals were scored within a couple of minutes in the middle of the second half by Hamburger SV striker Valdas Ivanauskas. The national team headed off to Korea without Bazylevych and his assistants whom were Mykola Pavlov and Vladimir Muntyan. Ukraine played two games and lost both. On 20 September 1994, Oleh Bazylevych was highly criticized at the federation's coaching meeting but was to be kept in position at the next meeting of the FFU Executive Committee a few days later. [11] However, the following day Bazylevych resigned accusing Bannikov of being tactless. On 24 September 1994, the Football Federation of Ukraine appointed Yozhef Sabo as an acting head coach until the end of the year.

Yozhef Sabo served as one of temporary managers until appointed of Lobanovsky Yozhef Sabo.jpg
Yozhef Sabo served as one of temporary managers until appointed of Lobanovsky

Following the change of coach, the national team level took a while to improve. Their next home game against Slovenia ended goalless. [12] After missing to obtain their first recent victory, Ukraine fell to bottom of the tournament table just above Estonian, whom they played their next home match against in mid-November, which they needed to win to keep any hopes of qualification alive. The Estonians, who were unable to field their best team, hoped to repeat the Slovenian effort a month earlier. [13] The game resulted in a 3–0 win. Serhiy Konovalov scored their first goal at competition level for the national team. Sabo left his post after the game. [14] and the FFU confirmed Anatoliy Konkov as the new head coach on 5 January 1995 .

Oleg Blokhin, head coach at the first World Cup participation in 2006 Oleg Blokhin-ua.jpeg
Oleg Blokhin, head coach at the first World Cup participation in 2006

In order to save situation and prepare for upcoming games against Italy and Croatia, Konkov conducted training camp at a sports base in Stubenberg, Styria near the Castle (Schloss) Schielleiten from 16 to 23 March 1995. According to the new head coach the set program of training camp was accomplished successfully. Their away game to Croatia ended in a 0–4 loss in Zagreb, followed by a 0–2 defeat to three times World champions Italy at the Olympic Stadium (then Respublikanskiy). [15]

1998–2004: near misses

Ukraine participated in the 1998 FIFA World Cup qualification, where the team was drawn into Group 9. Ukraine had improved their performance well, and surprised the qualification by taking the second place instead of the more-favored Portugal, only behind Germany, thus sent Ukraine to the first ever playoff, against Croatia. Unfortunately, Ukraine was eliminated 3–1 after aggregate by Croatia, and missed the chance to qualify for the first ever competitive tournament.

In UEFA Euro 2000 qualifying, Ukraine, assigned in Group 4, once again managed to top ahead of another favorite, Russia, thanks to an important draw in Moscow, but still only qualified for playoff despite being undefeated, including two successful goalless draws to then-world champions France. Ukraine then fell to Slovenia 3–2 after aggregate as well, and lost the chance to qualify for the third time. Ukraine's defeat to Slovenia was more tragic, when Miran Pavlin canceled early Ukrainian lead at home and sealed Slovenia in instead.

The 2002 FIFA World Cup qualification saw Ukraine in Group 5, and most of Ukraine's opponents were much weaker than Germany and France. Yet, Ukraine suffered a denting home loss to Poland in their opening account, and a number of draws had hampered Ukrainian hope to process. Ukraine eventually reached the playoff again, but this time could not manage to overcome the old foe, Germany, losing 5–2 on aggregate, and once again missed a major tournament debut.

The UEFA Euro 2004 qualifying was perhaps the most humiliating moment of Ukrainian football since its foundation. Assigned into Group 6, Ukraine's only major opponent at the time was a much stronger Spain. Ukraine had been in comfortable competitive place with Spain, having drawn the Spaniards at home. However, a surprising resurgence from the less known Greece had dented any hope for Ukraine, as Ukraine failed to reach playoff for the first time since UEFA Euro 1996 qualifying due to Greek resurgence. Greece would go on to conquer the first European title.

2006 FIFA World Cup

After an unsuccessful Euro 2004 qualifying campaign, Ukraine appointed Oleg Blokhin as the national team's head coach. Despite initial skepticism about his appointment due to his previous somewhat undistinguished coaching record and general public calls for a foreign coach; as well as Ukraine's difficult group position, being drawn with Turkey, Denmark and Greece, the latter had already won the Euro 2004 and caused upset on Ukraine in Euro 2004 qualification, Ukraine went on to qualify for their first-ever FIFA World Cup on 3 September 2005 after drawing 1–1 against Georgia in Tbilisi. In their first World Cup, in 2006, they were in the Group H together with Spain, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia. After losing 0–4 in the first match against Spain, the Ukrainians beat their other two opponents to reach the knock-out stage.

In the round of 16, Ukraine played against the winner of Group G, Switzerland, whom they beat on penalties. In the quarter-finals, they were beaten 0–3 by eventual champions Italy.

2006–2010: disappointment return

National football team of Ukraine, before the match with Bulgaria, "Vasil Levski" stadium, Sofia, Bulgaria, 14-12-2012 Ukraine national team in 2012.jpg
National football team of Ukraine, before the match with Bulgaria, "Vasil Levski" stadium, Sofia, Bulgaria, 14-12-2012

After a successful 2006 World Cup debut, Ukrainian enthusiasm increased for UEFA Euro 2008. Ukraine was assigned to Group B, only this time there was no playoff competition and thus, Ukraine had to seek one of the top two places. However, Ukraine failed to deliver the promised performance, partly because the team was unlucky to be drawn with 2006 World Cup finalists Italy and France; however, Ukraine had also performed terribly against weaker opponents like Scotland, Georgia and Lithuania, two shock losses and a draw away to these opponents had effectively ruined Ukraine's hope to qualify for the tournament, finishing in fourth place.

The 2010 FIFA World Cup qualification saw Ukraine regain some good improvement. Drawn in the Group 6, two good draws to a strong Croatian side and more importantly, a home win over England, sending Ukraine to a playoff for the first time since 2004 Euro qualification. However, Greece, which had been eliminated by Ukraine in the qualifiers four years earlier, would take revenge. Despite successfully drawing goalless in Athens, Ukraine suffered a bitter home defeat to the Greeks in Donetsk, a reply to Ukraine's elimination of Greece back in Athens. This meant Ukraine lost its first ever playoff match at home, and failed to qualify for 2010 FIFA World Cup.

UEFA Euro 2012

Ukraine national football team in 2012 Ukraine national football team 20120611.jpg
Ukraine national football team in 2012

As co-hosts, Ukraine qualified automatically for Euro 2012, [2] marking their debut in the UEFA European Championship. In their opening game against Sweden, Ukraine won 2–1 in Kyiv. Despite the team's efforts, however, Ukraine was eliminated after a 0–2 loss to France and a 0–1 loss to England, both in Donetsk.

2014 World Cup qualification – UEFA Group H

The 2014 FIFA World Cup qualification was acceptable for the Ukrainian squad. Being drawn with fellow Euro 2012 host Poland, together with England and newcomer Montenegro, Ukraine had to face tough competitors. Despite facing struggles from the Montenegrin side, Ukraine was able to qualify for the playoff, thanks to two wins over Poland and two draws over England, where it would play against France. Ukraine beat France at home 2–0, but suffered a bitter 0–3 loss away, and thus failed to reach the 2014 FIFA World Cup.

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification Flag of England.svg Flag of Ukraine.svg Flag of Montenegro.svg Flag of Poland.svg Flag of Moldova.svg Flag of San Marino.svg
1Flag of England.svg  England 10640314+2722Qualification to 2014 FIFA World Cup 1–1 4–1 2–0 4–0 5–0
2Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 10631284+2421Advance to second round 0–0 0–1 1–0 2–1 9–0
3Flag of Montenegro.svg  Montenegro 104331817+115 1–1 0–4 2–2 2–5 3–0
4Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 103431812+613 1–1 1–3 1–1 2–0 5–0
5Flag of Moldova.svg  Moldova 103251217511 0–5 0–0 0–1 1–1 3–0
6Flag of San Marino.svg  San Marino 100010154530 0–8 0–8 0–6 1–5 0–2
Source: [ citation needed ]

UEFA Euro 2016

Ukraine national football team in 2015 Ukraine vs Luxembourg 14062015 UEFA EURO 2016 Qualifying round - Group C (6).jpg
Ukraine national football team in 2015

In the Euro 2016 qualifying round, Ukraine were drawn against Spain, Slovakia, Belarus, Macedonia and Luxembourg. The Zbirna was expected to qualify for the tournament as runners-up of the group behind Spain but, despite having won all their other matches, they finished third due to poor results against Spain and Slovakia. They therefore had to face Slovenia in the play-off route (the side to which they had succumbed at the same stage of the 2000 edition) ; they recorded a 2–0 win at Lviv before forging a 1–1 draw at the very end of the second game.

Ukraine convincingly won all of their preparation friendlies against Cyprus, Wales, Romania and Albania. At club level, FC Dnipro had recently reached the UEFA Europa League final in 2015, while Shakhtar Donetsk had progressed to the semi-finals one year later, as the Ukrainian clubs succeeded in sending one participant to the round of 16 of the UEFA Champions League two times in a row. Having been drawn against world champions Germany, Slavic neighbors Poland and first-time Euro participants Northern Ireland, the Ukrainian team was expected to advance at least to the next round.

The tournament however, turned into a dreadful upset. Ukraine lost all of their three games, while also failing to score a single goal. Their first match resulted in a 2–0 loss to Germany, despite good resistance and great chances during an entertaining first half, they eventually came close to levelling the score but were caught on the counterattack at the very end of the game. This was followed by a second 2–0 loss to Northern Ireland, with a goal once again conceded in injury time. The Ukrainian media mainly criticized coach Mykhaylo Fomenko's perceived inadequate psychological preparation of the squad as much as predictable tactics which were judged as easy to break down. Ukrainians stars Andriy Yarmolenko and Yevhen Konoplyanka's under-performance was also mentioned. Ukraine at this stage were the first team eliminated from the competition and lost their last game to Poland 1–0.

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 321030+37 [lower-alpha 1] Advance to knockout phase
2Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 321020+27 [lower-alpha 1]
3Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 31022203
4Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 30030550
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Notes:
  1. 1 2 Tied on head-to-head result (Germany 0–0 Poland). Overall goal difference was used as the tiebreaker.

2018 FIFA World Cup qualification – UEFA Group I

Ukraine started off with a home draw to eventual group leaders Iceland and an away draw to Turkey. This was followed by two home wins, 3–0 against Kosovo and 1–0 against Finland. Despite a 1–0 away loss to Croatia, they beat Finland 1–2 away and Turkey 2–0 at home. This was followed by a 2–0 away loss to Iceland and a 0–2 away win against Kosovo. Going to the last game, Ukraine stood a strong chance of qualifying for the tournament, but after a 0–2 home loss to Croatia, they failed to qualify for the play-offs for their first time since UEFA Euro 2004 qualifying. In their last game against Croatia, former Dynamo Kyiv footballer Domagoj Vida became famous for his "Slava Ukraini" video which showed solidarity with Ukraine for the Russian invasion of Ukraine in 2014.

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of Iceland.svgFlag of Croatia.svgFlag of Ukraine.svgFlag of Turkey.svgFlag of Finland.svgFlag of Kosovo.svg
1Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 10712167+922Qualification to 2018 FIFA World Cup 1–0 2–0 2–0 3–2 2–0
2Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 10622154+1120Advance to second round 2–0 1–0 1–1 1–1 1–0
3Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 10523139+417 1–1 0–2 2–0 1–0 3–0
4Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 104331413+115 0–3 1–0 2–2 2–0 2–0
5Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 1023591349 1–0 0–1 1–2 2–2 1–1
6Flag of Kosovo.svg  Kosovo 10019324211 1–2 0–6 0–2 1–4 0–1
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers

2018–19 UEFA Nations League

Ukraine was drawn with the Czech Republic and Slovakia in League B. They beat the Czech Republic 1–2 away and Slovakia 1–0 at home, before earning a promotion with a 1–0 home win to the Czech Republic, before ending with a heavy 4–1 away loss to Slovakia.

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsPromotion [lower-alpha 1] Flag of Ukraine.svg Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Flag of Slovakia.svg
1Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine (P)43015509Promotion to League A 1–0 1–0
2Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 42024406 1–2 1–0
3Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 41035503 4–1 1–2
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(P) Promoted
Notes:
  1. Due to revamp of the format for the 2020–21 UEFA Nations League, no teams were eventually relegated.

UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying – UEFA Group B

Ukraine were placed in a tough group with Euro 2016 title holders Portugal, and Serbia—a side with personnel playing for multiple prominent club teams. According to many sports analysts, Ukraine were tipped to finish third in the group. The first match proved to be the most difficult match—an away game against Portugal. With the centre-back Yaroslav Rakytskiy absent due to his controversial move to Russian club Zenit Saint Petersburg and the return of Cristiano Ronaldo to the Portuguese lineup after an absent Nations League, the Portuguese were favoured to win by a comfortable margin. However, contrary to popular prediction, Andriy Shevchenko's side proved to be very stubborn. Although the Portuguese controlled the majority of the game's possession, they could not find the back of the net. A heroic showing from goalkeeper Andriy Pyatov as well as persistent marking of Cristiano Ronaldo and the Portuguese attack by Ukraine's defense earned Ukraine a valuable point in Lisbon. The match ended with a 0–0 scoreline.

The second game (4 days after the positive result in Portugal) was away to supposed minnows of the group, Luxembourg. However, this match proved to be an absolute nightmare for the Ukrainians. After struggling to come up with inventive attacks, a very lacklustre Ukrainian side found themselves down 1–0 thanks to a goal from David Turpel, aided by very disorganized defending on the part of the Ukrainians. Right before the end of the first half, Ukraine did find an equalizer through Viktor Tsyhankov. Ukraine struggled to create any meaningful opportunities in a stressful second half. However, with literally the last kick of the ball in stoppage time (from a freekick), Ukraine found themselves extremely lucky and unlikely 2–1 winners when Gerson Rodrigues of Luxembourg headed the ball into his own goal. Therefore, after the first two matchdays, Ukraine found themselves top of the group with 4 points after Portugal and Serbia played a 1–1 match in Lisbon on the same day.

Matchday 3 came with a stiff test—a home match against a well-rounded and versatile Serbian squad boasting many experienced and skillful players from multiple world-renowned clubs. While it was expected to be a reasonably close match, it could not have been more of a rout. What appeared to be a well balanced and close affair within the opening exchanges of the first half quickly changed when Viktor Tsyhankov scored the opening goal in the 26th minute of play. The second goal (also by Tsyhankov) was scored from a thunderous strike from long range less than two minutes later. Ukraine went on to win the match 5–0 with Roman Yaremchuk achieving his first ever international goal and Yevhen Konoplyanka helping himself to two goals. At this point, with positive results against the two supposedly strongest opponents in the groups, Ukraine looked as though they could secure a top two finish and avoid the play-offs.

After another stiff contest with Luxembourg, Ukraine managed to secure a 1–0 victory only three days after their triumph over Serbia. The goal came in the 6th minute from Roman Yaremchuk. Two matches—away and home against Lithuania (winning 3–0 and 2–0 respectively) saw Ukraine with 16 points and in need of only a point against Fernando Santos's Portuguese side, who at this point were crowned UEFA Nations League Champions.

The match against Portugal was expected to be an interesting test for Shevchenko's men, who had not lost a single match in qualifying and had only conceded once. Ukraine started brightly with noticeably more attacking intent than in the previous meeting between these two teams. Indeed, their pressure paid off when Roman Yaremchuk scored from close range after an initial save from Rui Patrício on 6 minutes. In the 27th minute, Ukraine doubled their advantage with an Andriy Yarmolenko goal. After building this comfortable lead, Ukraine began to sit back and defend as they did in Lisbon on matchday one. Portugal was once again unable to crack Ukraine's defense. However, in the 72nd minute, Cristiano Ronaldo was awarded a penalty kick from a supposed hand-ball by Taras Stepanenko as he blocked the ball from a Portuguese shot. While VAR was not an option, replays showed that this was an incorrect call from the referee, as the ball was blocked by Stepanenko's leg, before making contact with his arm as it deflected into the air. This incident also resulted in a red card for Stepanenko. Thus, Ukraine had to play the rest of the match with ten men. Ronaldo scored from the spot, giving Portugal a glimmer of hope to rescue the game and earn a valid point in Kyiv. However, it wasn't to be Portugal's night. Ukraine won 2–1 and subsequently won the group.

The last match was played in Belgrade against Serbia. Because Ukraine had already qualified and won the group, Shevchenko decided to field a team with a few less experienced players. Serbia on the other hand, had to win for any hopes of automatic qualification. Serbia took the lead early through a Dušan Tadić penalty kick. After controlling the majority of the match after falling behind, Ukraine found an equaliser through the inevitable Yaremchuk. Serbia took control of the second half and restored their lead thanks to a beautiful Aleksandar Mitrović finish. Serbia continued to search for another goal with multiple chances. However, in the last minute of stoppage time, Yarmolenko sent a low cross across the Serbian goal which was received by Artem Biesiedin and finished into the bottom corner. The match ended 2–2 and Ukraine accomplished a successful qualification campaign without a single loss. With Portugal beating Luxembourg 2–0, Serbia's hopes of direct qualification were shot.

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification Flag of Ukraine.svg Flag of Portugal.svg Flag of Serbia.svg Flag of Luxembourg.svg Flag of Lithuania.svg
1Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 8620174+1320Qualify for final tournament 2–1 5–0 1–0 2–0
2Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 8521226+1617 0–0 1–1 3–0 6–0
3Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia 84221717014Advance to play-offs via Nations League 2–2 2–4 3–2 4–1
4Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 811671694 1–2 0–2 1–3 2–1
5Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania 8017525201 0–3 1–5 1–2 1–1
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers

2020–21 UEFA Nations League

Ukraine was drawn with Switzerland, Spain, and Germany in League A. The Ukrainians started their campaign by overcoming Switzerland at home 2–1 to temporarily take first place. However, their next opponent Spain proved to be too strong, and Ukraine was unable to produce any significant threat, losing 4-0. In October, Ukraine returned home to play two subsequent games against Germany and Spain, with nearly half of the main squad having contracted COVID-19 or injured. The first match against Germany saw a German win by a score of 2–1 in Kyiv. With a demoralized squad, Ukraine had to face a powerful Spain side who was impressing in the Nations League. However, despite significant absence of many key members, Ukraine shockingly defeated Spain for the first time with a 1–0 win to end Spain's 13 games undefeated streak. In November, Ukraine had two important games in order to survive in the League, and their first game against Germany away saw Ukraine obtain an early lead, but it was to be in vain when the Germans bounced back to win 3–1. As the COVID-19 crisis in Ukraine worsened, eight players from the starting squad tested positive (including one positive SARS-CoV-2 test upon arrival to Lucerne), and as a result, the entire delegation was put into quarantine by the Department of Health of the Canton of Lucerne. [16] Their game against Switzerland away was sequently cancelled. Ukraine faced relegation if the game was to be awarded 3–0 to Switzerland or if the result is decided by a drawing of lots and Switzerland were to be handed a 1–0 victory. Eventually, UEFA decided that the match result would be 3–0 in favour of Switzerland, meaning that Ukraine had been officially relegated after just one season in League A.

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification or relegation Flag of Spain.svg Flag of Germany.svg Flag of Switzerland.svg Flag of Ukraine.svg
1Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 6321133+1011Qualification to Nations League Finals 6–0 1–0 4–0
2Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 6231101339 1–1 3–3 3–1
3Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 613298+16 [lower-alpha 1] 1–1 1–1 3–0 [lower-alpha 2]
4Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine (R)620451386 [lower-alpha 1] Relegation to League B 1–0 1–2 2–1
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(R) Relegated
Notes:
  1. 1 2 Tied on head-to-head points (3). Head-to-head goal difference: Switzerland +2, Ukraine −2.
  2. The Switzerland v Ukraine match was awarded as a 3–0 win to Switzerland after being cancelled as Ukraine were placed in quarantine prior to the match due to positive SARS-CoV-2 tests in the team.

UEFA Euro 2020

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands (H)330082+69Advance to knockout phase
2Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 320143+16
3Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 31024513
4Flag of North Macedonia.svg  North Macedonia 30032860
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
(H) Host

Ukraine managed to qualify to the knockout stages in the European Championship for the first time, as one of the best third-placed teams. Then, they upset the Swedish team, 2–1, in the round of 16, on June 29, as Artem Dovbyk scored the winning goal at 120+1 minute. Unfortunately, they were not able to progress to the semi-finals as they were knocked out 4–0 by England in the quarter-final. Ironically, Ukraine's quarter-finals finish in Euro 2020 would end up seeing Italy emerged victorious in the tournament once again, a repeat of the 2006 FIFA World Cup performance.

2022 FIFA World Cup qualification – UEFA Group D

Ukraine first got a surprise 1–1 draw over the world champions France, which was highly praised. Antoine Griezmann made the first goal in the 19th minute. Serhiy Sydorchuk then kicked the ball at the 57th minute which deflected off of Presnel Kimpembe for an own goal on France. [17] However, Ukraine subsequently disappointed the next three games, when both their home games against weaker opponents Finland and Kazakhstan ended in two another one-one draws, before tying Kazakhstan 2–2 on the road as well on September 1, with Ukraine blew up its lead in the injury times of the second half. Following the game against France at home, where Ukraine blew up its lead to end the game in yet another 1–1 draw, Ukraine has officially broken the record previously held by Australia for the most consecutive draws in a World Cup qualification, with five straight draws out of five to Australia's four back in the previous qualification, leaving Ukraine's hope to qualify for Qatar in limbo.

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification Flag of France.svg Flag of Ukraine.svg Flag of Finland.svg Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Flag of Kazakhstan.svg
1Flag of France.svg  France 633083+512Qualification to 2022 FIFA World Cup 1–1 2–0 1–1 13 Nov
2Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 50506605Advance to second round 1–1 1–1 12 Oct 1–1
3Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 41214515 16 Nov 9 Oct 2–2 1–0
4Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina 40315613 0–1 16 Nov 13 Nov 2–2
5Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 50325833 0–2 2–2 12 Oct 9 Oct
Updated to match(es) played on 7 September 2021. Source: FIFA, UEFA

Stadiums

The most important matches of the Ukrainian national team are held in Kyiv's Olimpiyskiy National Sports Complex, also home of Dynamo Kyiv. New infrastructure and stadiums were built in preparation for Euro 2012, and other venues include stadiums in the cities of Donetsk, Kharkiv, Lviv, Dnipro, Odesa. The alternative stadiums are: Metalist Stadium (Kharkiv), Arena Lviv (Lviv), Dnipro-Arena (Dnipro), and Chornomorets Stadium (Odessa).

During the Soviet time era (before 1991), only three stadiums in Ukraine were used in official games, the Olimpiysky NSC in Kyiv (known then as Republican Stadium), the predecessor of Chornomorets, BSS Central Stadium in Odesa, and the Lokomotiv Stadium in Simferopol.

Home venue record

Since Ukraine's first fixture (29 April 1992 vs. Hungary) they have played their home games at 11 different stadiums.

VenueCityPlayedWonDrawnLostGFGAPoints per game
Olimpiyskiy National Sports Complex Kyiv 6229211288521.74
Valeriy Lobanovskyi Dynamo Stadium Kyiv 20135238152.2
Arena Lviv Lviv 1311203252.69
Metalist Oblast Sports Complex Kharkiv 137242191.77
Ukraina Stadium Lviv 66001453
Chornomorets Stadium Odesa 5410622.6
Donbass Arena Donetsk 5014290.2
Dnipro-Arena Dnipro 4310522.5
Shakhtar Stadium Donetsk 2011020.5
Slavutych-Arena Zaporizhzhia 1100103
Meteor Stadium Dnipro 1010221
Avanhard Stadium Uzhhorod 100113
Totals1337435242101061.93
Last updated: 4 September 2021. Statistics include official FIFA-recognised matches only.

Kits and sponsors

Kit history and evolution

On 29 March 2010, Ukraine debuted a new Adidas kit. [18] This replaced the Adidas kit with a yellow base and the traditional Adidas three stripe with a snake sash which was used in 2009. [19] Prior to 5 February 2009 Ukraine wore a Lotto kit. In 2009 the official team kit was produced by German company Adidas which has a contract with the Ukrainian team until 31 December 2016. Joma manufactured the kits starting from the year 2017 for the match against Croatia on 24 March 2017. [20]

Former crest. Logo of Football Federation of Ukraine.svg
Former crest.

Sponsors

Marketing for the Football Federation of Ukraine is conducted by the Ukraine Football International (UFI).

Former title and general sponsors included Ukrtelecom, Kyivstar, [24] Nordex (Austria), [25] [26] and Geoton.

Results and fixtures

The following matches were played or are scheduled to be played by the national team in the current or upcoming seasons.

2020

6 September 2020 (2020-09-06) 2020–21 UEFA Nations League A Spain  Flag of Spain.svg4–0Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine Madrid, Spain
20:45 Ramos Soccerball shade.svg 3' (pen.), 29'
Fati Soccerball shade.svg 32'
F. Torres Soccerball shade.svg 84'
Report Stadium: Alfredo Di Stéfano Stadium
Attendance: 0
Referee: Benoît Bastien (France)
7 October 2020 FIFA International Friendly France  Flag of France.svg7–1Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine Saint-Denis, France
Camavinga Soccerball shade.svg 9'
Giroud Soccerball shade.svg 24', 34'
Mykolenko Soccerball shade.svg 39' (o.g.)
Tolisso Soccerball shade.svg 65'
Mbappé Soccerball shade.svg 82'
Griezmann Soccerball shade.svg 89'
Report Tsyhankov Soccerball shade.svg 53'Stadium: Stade de France
Referee: Andris Treimanis (Latvia)
10 October 2020 (2020-10-10) 2020–21 UEFA Nations League A Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svg1–2Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Kyiv, Ukraine
21:45 Malinovskyi Soccerball shade.svg 77' (pen.) Report Ginter Soccerball shade.svg 20'
Goretzka Soccerball shade.svg 49'
Stadium: NSK Olimpiyskiy
Attendance: 17,573 [27]
Referee: Orel Grinfeld (Israel)
13 October 2020 (2020-10-13) 2020–21 UEFA Nations League A Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svg1–0Flag of Spain.svg  Spain Kyiv, Ukraine
21:45 Tsyhankov Soccerball shade.svg 76' Report Stadium: NSK Olimpiyskiy
Referee: Paweł Gil (Poland)
11 November 2020 FIFA International Friendly Poland  Flag of Poland.svg2–0Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine Chorzów, Poland
20:45 Piątek Soccerball shade.svg 40'
Moder Soccerball shade.svg 63'
Report Stadium: Silesian Stadium
Attendance: 0
Referee: Manuel Schüttengruber (Austria)
14 November 2020 (2020-11-14) 2020–21 UEFA Nations League A Germany  Flag of Germany.svg3–1Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine Leipzig, Germany
20:45 Sané Soccerball shade.svg 23'
Werner Soccerball shade.svg 33', 64'
Report Yaremchuk Soccerball shade.svg 12'Stadium: Red Bull Arena
Referee: Ovidiu Hațegan (Romania)
17 November 2020 (2020-11-17) 2020–21 UEFA Nations League A Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg3–0
(awd.)
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine Lucerne, Switzerland
Stadium: Swissporarena
Referee: Anastasios Sidiropoulos (Greece)

2021

24 March 2021 (2021-03-24) 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification France  Flag of France.svg1–1Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine Saint-Denis, France
20:45 Griezmann Soccerball shade.svg 19' Report Sydorchuk Soccerball shade.svg 57'Stadium: Stade de France
Referee: Tobias Stieler (Germany)
28 March 2021 (2021-03-28) 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svg1–1Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Kyiv, Ukraine
20:45 (21:45 UTC+3) Moraes Soccerball shade.svg 80' Report Pukki Soccerball shade.svg 89' (pen.)Stadium: NSK Olimpiyskiy
Referee: István Kovács (Romania)
31 March 2021 (2021-03-31) 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svg1–1Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan Kyiv, Ukraine
20:45 (21:45 UTC+3) Yaremchuk Soccerball shade.svg 20' Report Muzhikov Soccerball shade.svg 59'Stadium: NSK Olimpiyskiy
Referee: Matej Jug (Slovenia)
23 May 2021 (2021-05-23) FIFA International Friendly Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svg1–1Flag of Bahrain.svg  Bahrain Kharkiv, Ukraine
Stadium: Metalist Stadium
Referee: Pavel Orel (Czech Republic)
7 June 2021 (2021-06-07) [lower-alpha 2] FIFA International Friendly Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svg4–0Flag of Cyprus.svg  Cyprus Kharkiv, Ukraine
Report Stadium: Metalist Stadium
Referee: Vitālijs Spasjoņņikovs (Latvia)
13 June 2021 (2021-06-13) UEFA Euro 2020 Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg3–2Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine Amsterdam, Netherlands
21:00  UTC+2
Report
Stadium: Johan Cruyff Arena
Attendance: 15,837
Referee: Felix Brych (Germany)
17 June 2021 (2021-06-17) UEFA Euro 2020 Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svg2–1Flag of North Macedonia.svg  North Macedonia Bucharest, Romania
16:00  UTC+3
Report
Stadium: Arena Națională
Attendance: 10,001
Referee: Fernando Rapallini (Argentina)
21 June 2021 (2021-06-21) UEFA Euro 2020 Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svg0–1Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Bucharest, Romania
19:00  UTC+3 Report Stadium: Arena Națională
Attendance: 10,472
Referee: Cüneyt Çakır (Turkey)
29 June 2021 UEFA Euro 2020 R16 Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg1–2 (a.e.t.)Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine Glasgow, Scotland
20:00 UTC+1
Report
Stadium: Hampden Park
Attendance: 9,221
Referee: Daniele Orsato (Italy)
3 July 2021 UEFA Euro 2020 QF Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svg0–4Flag of England.svg  England Rome, Italy
21:00 CEST Report
Stadium: Stadio Olimpico
Attendance: 11,880
Referee: Felix Brych (Germany)
1 September 2021 (2021-09-01) 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Kazakhstan  Flag of Kazakhstan.svg2–2Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan
16:00 (20:00 UTC+6) Valiullin Soccerball shade.svg 74', 90+6' Report
Stadium: Astana Arena
Referee: Donatas Rumšas (Lithuania)
4 September 2021 (2021-09-04) 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svg1–1Flag of France.svg  France Kyiv, Ukraine
20:45 (21:45 UTC+3)
Report
Stadium: NSK Olimpiyskiy
Referee: Slavko Vinčić (Slovenia)
8 September 2021 (2021-09-08) Friendly Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg1–1Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine Plzeň, Czech Republic
20:45  UTC+2
Report
Stadium: Doosan Arena
Attendance: 5,231
Referee: Filip Glova (Slovakia)
9 October 2021 (2021-10-09) 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Finland  Flag of Finland.svgvFlag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine Finland
18:00 (19:00 UTC+3) Report Stadium: Helsinki Olympic Stadium, Helsinki
12 October 2021 (2021-10-12) 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svgvFlag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina Lviv, Ukraine
20:45 (21:45 UTC+3) Report Stadium: Arena Lviv
11 November 2021 (2021-11-11) Friendly Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svgvFlag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria Odesa, Ukraine
Stadium: Chornomorets Stadium
16 November 2021 (2021-11-16) 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification Bosnia and Herzegovina  Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svgvFlag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine Bosnia and Herzegovina
20:45 Report

Coaching staff

Currently approved: [28]

PositionName
Head coach Flag of Ukraine.svg Oleksandr Petrakov (interim)
Assistant coaches Flag of Ukraine.svg Andriy Annenkov
Flag of Ukraine.svg Oleksandr Shovkovskyi
Goalkeeping coach Flag of Ukraine.svg Vyacheslav Kernozenko
Fitness coaches Flag of Ukraine.svg Ivan Bashtovyi
Flag of Ukraine.svg Vyacheslav Ruzhentsev

Coaching history

Last updated on 8 September 2021. [29] [30]

ManagerNationUkraine careerPlayedWonDrawnLostGFGAWin %Qualifying cycleFinal tour
Viktor Prokopenko Flag of Ukraine.svg 1992301225
Mykola Pavlov (caretaker) Flag of Ukraine.svg 1992101011
Oleh Bazylevych Flag of Ukraine.svg 1993–199411434131436.36 1996
Mykola Pavlov (caretaker) Flag of Ukraine.svg 1994200203
Yozhef Sabo Flag of Ukraine.svg 199421103050 1996
Anatoliy Konkov Flag of Ukraine.svg 1995730481342.86 1996
Yozhef Sabo Flag of Ukraine.svg 1996–19993215116442646.88 1998, 2000
Valeriy Lobanovskyi Flag of Ukraine.svg 2000–200118675202033.33 2002
Leonid Buryak Flag of Ukraine.svg 2002–200319568182326.32 2004
Oleg Blokhin Flag of Ukraine.svg 2003–200746211411654045.65 2006, 2008 2006
Oleksiy Mykhaylychenko Flag of Ukraine.svg 2008–2009211254311657.14 2010
Myron Markevych [31] Flag of Ukraine.svg 201043109375
Yuriy Kalytvyntsev (caretaker) [32] Flag of Ukraine.svg 2010–20118152101312.5
Oleg Blokhin [33] Flag of Ukraine.svg 2011–201218738272838.89 2014 2012
Andriy Bal (caretaker) [34] Flag of Ukraine.svg 2012201101 2014
Oleksandr Zavarov (caretaker) Flag of Ukraine.svg 2012110010100
Mykhaylo Fomenko [35] Flag of Ukraine.svg 2012–2016372467672264.86 2014, 2016 2016
Andriy Shevchenko Flag of Ukraine.svg 2016–202151251313716149.02 2018, 2020, 2022 2020
Oleksandr Petrakov (caretaker) Flag of Ukraine.svg 2021–303044 2022

Players

Current squad

The following players players were called up for the 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification matches against Kazakhstan and France on 1 and 4 September 2021 and the friendly match against Czech Republic on 8 September 2021. [36]
Caps and goals updated as of 8 September 2021, after the match against Czech Republic. [37] [38] [39] [40] [41]

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Denys Boyko (1988-01-29) 29 January 1988 (age 33)70 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv
231 GK Dmytro Riznyk (1999-01-30) 30 January 1999 (age 22)00 Flag of Ukraine.svg Vorskla Poltava

212 DF Oleksandr Karavayev (1992-06-02) 2 June 1992 (age 29)391 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv
42 DF Serhiy Kryvtsov (1991-03-15) 15 March 1991 (age 30)270 Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk
22 DF Eduard Sobol (1995-04-20) 20 April 1995 (age 26)230 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Club Brugge
192 DF Oleksandr Tymchyk (1997-01-20) 20 January 1997 (age 24)60 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv
52 DF Yukhym Konoplya (1999-08-26) 26 August 1999 (age 22)30 Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk
82 DF Viktor Korniyenko (1999-02-14) 14 February 1999 (age 22)11 Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk
32 DF Oleksandr Syrota (2000-06-11) 11 June 2000 (age 21)10 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv
182 DF Taras Kacharaba (1995-01-07) 7 January 1995 (age 26)10 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague

73 MF Andriy Yarmolenko (captain) (1989-10-23) 23 October 1989 (age 31)10242 Flag of England.svg West Ham United
173 MF Oleksandr Zinchenko (1996-12-15) 15 December 1996 (age 24)467 Flag of England.svg Manchester City
103 MF Mykola Shaparenko (1998-10-04) 4 October 1998 (age 22)201 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv
143 MF Yevhenii Makarenko (1991-05-21) 21 May 1991 (age 30)150 Flag of Hungary.svg Fehérvár
113 MF Oleksandr Zubkov (1996-08-03) 3 August 1996 (age 25)141 Flag of Hungary.svg Ferencváros
223 MF Serhiy Buletsa (1999-02-16) 16 February 1999 (age 22)10 Flag of Ukraine.svg Zorya Luhansk
153 MF Vladyslav Kocherhin (1996-04-30) 30 April 1996 (age 25)10 Flag of Ukraine.svg Zorya Luhansk

94 FW Roman Yaremchuk (1995-11-27) 27 November 1995 (age 25)3211 Flag of Portugal.svg Benfica
204 FW Danylo Sikan (2001-04-16) 16 April 2001 (age 20)31 Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up for the team within the last 12 months.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Andriy Pyatov (1984-06-28) 28 June 1984 (age 37)990 Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk v. Flag of France.svg  France , 4 September 2021
GK Heorhiy Bushchan (1994-05-31) 31 May 1994 (age 27)110 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv v. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan , 1 September 2021 INJ
GK Andriy Lunin (1999-02-11) 11 February 1999 (age 22)60 Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid v. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan , 1 September 2021 COV
GK Anatoliy Trubin (2001-08-01) 1 August 2001 (age 20)20 Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk v. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan , 1 September 2021 INJ
GK Yuriy Pankiv (1984-11-03) 3 November 1984 (age 36)00 Flag of Ukraine.svg Rukh Lviv v. Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland , 17 November 2020
GK Mykyta Shevchenko (1993-01-26) 26 January 1993 (age 28)00 Flag of Ukraine.svg Zorya Luhansk v. Flag of Spain.svg  Spain , 13 October 2020

DF Mykola Matviyenko (1996-05-02) 2 May 1996 (age 25)430 Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk v. Flag of France.svg  France , 4 September 2021
DF Vitaliy Mykolenko (1999-05-29) 29 May 1999 (age 22)210 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv v. Flag of France.svg  France , 4 September 2021
DF Illya Zabarnyi (2002-09-01) 1 September 2002 (age 19)150 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv v. Flag of France.svg  France , 4 September 2021
DF Bohdan Mykhaylichenko (1997-03-21) 21 March 1997 (age 24)60 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Anderlecht v. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan , 1 September 2021 RES
DF Denys Popov (1999-02-17) 17 February 1999 (age 22)10 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv v. Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden , 29 June 2021 INJ
DF Valeriy Bondar (1999-02-27) 27 February 1999 (age 22)10 Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk v. Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland , 17 November 2020
DF Yevhen Cheberko (1998-01-23) 23 January 1998 (age 23)10 Flag of Croatia.svg Osijek v. Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland , 17 November 2020
DF Ihor Plastun (1990-08-20) 20 August 1990 (age 31)40 Flag of Bulgaria.svg Ludogorets Razgrad v. Flag of Spain.svg  Spain , 13 October 2020
DF Serhiy Bolbat (1993-06-13) 13 June 1993 (age 28)50 Flag of Ukraine.svg Desna Chernihiv v. Flag of France.svg  France , 7 October 2020 INJ

MF Taras Stepanenko (1989-08-08) 8 August 1989 (age 32)653 Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk v. Flag of France.svg  France , 4 September 2021
MF Ruslan Malinovskyi (1993-05-04) 4 May 1993 (age 28)436 Flag of Italy.svg Atalanta v. Flag of France.svg  France , 4 September 2021
MF Serhiy Sydorchuk (1991-05-02) 2 May 1991 (age 30)433 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv v. Flag of France.svg  France , 4 September 2021
MF Viktor Tsyhankov (1997-11-15) 15 November 1997 (age 23)316 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv v. Flag of France.svg  France , 4 September 2021
MF Vitaliy Buyalskyi (1993-01-06) 6 January 1993 (age 28)90 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv v. Flag of France.svg  France , 4 September 2021 INJ
MF Ihor Kharatin (1995-02-02) 2 February 1995 (age 26)40 Flag of Poland.svg Legia Warsaw v. Flag of France.svg  France , 4 September 2021 INJ
MF Yevhen Konoplyanka (1989-09-29) 29 September 1989 (age 31)8621 Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk v. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan , 1 September 2021 RES
MF Viktor Kovalenko (1996-02-14) 14 February 1996 (age 25)320 Flag of Italy.svg Spezia v. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan , 1 September 2021 RES
MF Marlos (1988-06-07) 7 June 1988 (age 33)271 Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk v. Flag of England.svg  England , 3 July 2021 RET
MF Roman Bezus (1990-09-26) 26 September 1990 (age 30)245 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Gent v. Flag of England.svg  England , 3 July 2021
MF Heorhiy Sudakov (2002-09-01) 1 September 2002 (age 19)30 Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk v. Flag of England.svg  England , 3 July 2021
MF Bohdan Lyednyev (1998-04-07) 7 April 1998 (age 23)00 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv v. Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland , 3 June 2021
MF Artem Bondarenko (2000-08-21) 21 August 2000 (age 21)00 Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
MF Volodymyr Shepelyev (1997-06-01) 1 June 1997 (age 24)70 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv v. Flag of Bahrain.svg  Bahrain , 23 May 2021 INJ
MF Oleksandr Andriyevskyi (1994-06-25) 25 June 1994 (age 27)10 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv v. Flag of Bahrain.svg  Bahrain , 23 May 2021 INJ
MF Oleksandr Nazarenko (2000-02-01) 1 February 2000 (age 21)00 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dnipro-1 v. Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland , 17 November 2020
MF Yevhen Shakhov (1990-11-30) 30 November 1990 (age 30)71 Flag of Greece.svg AEK Athens v. Flag of Poland.svg  Poland , 11 November 2020 COV

FW Artem Dovbyk (1997-06-21) 21 June 1997 (age 24)31 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dnipro-1 v. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan , 1 September 2021 INJ
FW Artem Besyedin (1996-03-31) 31 March 1996 (age 25)182 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv v. Flag of England.svg  England , 3 July 2021
FW Júnior Moraes (1987-04-04) 4 April 1987 (age 34)111 Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk v. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan , 31 March 2021 INJ
FW Vladyslav Supriaha (2000-02-15) 15 February 2000 (age 21)00 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv v. Flag of Poland.svg  Poland , 11 November 2020 COV
FW Artem Kravets (1989-06-03) 3 June 1989 (age 32)238 Flag of Turkey.svg Konyaspor v. Flag of Poland.svg  Poland , 11 November 2020 INJ

Notes:

Previous squads

Player records

As of 8 September 2021 [37] [42] [39] [40]
Players in bold are still active with Ukraine.

Most capped players

Anatoliy Tymoshchuk and Andriy Shevchenko being honored by UEFA in 2011 for their 100th cap. They are the first and second most capped players in the history of Ukraine. Andrii Shevchenko ta Anatolii Timoshchuk.jpeg
Anatoliy Tymoshchuk and Andriy Shevchenko being honored by UEFA in 2011 for their 100th cap. They are the first and second most capped players in the history of Ukraine.
Andriy Shevchenko is the top scorer in the history of Ukraine with 48 goals. Andriy Shevchenko Euro 2012 vs Sweden detail1.jpg
Andriy Shevchenko is the top scorer in the history of Ukraine with 48 goals.
RankPlayerCapsGoalsPeriod
1 Anatoliy Tymoshchuk 14442000–2016
2 Andriy Shevchenko 111481995–2012
3 Andriy Yarmolenko 102422009–present
4 Ruslan Rotan 10082003–2018
5 Andriy Pyatov 9902007–present
6 Oleh Husyev 98132003–2016
7 Oleksandr Shovkovskyi 9201994–2012
8 Yevhen Konoplyanka 86212010–present
9 Serhiy Rebrov 75151992–2006
10 Andriy Voronin 7482002–2012

Top goalscorers

RankPlayerGoalsCapsAveragePeriod
1 Andriy Shevchenko 481110.431995–2012
2 Andriy Yarmolenko 421020.412009–present
3 Yevhen Konoplyanka 21860.242010–present
4 Serhiy Rebrov 15750.21992–2006
5 Oleh Husyev 13980.132003–2016
6 Serhiy Nazarenko 12560.212003–2012
7 Roman Yaremchuk 11320.342018–present
Yevhen Seleznyov 11580.192008–2018
9 Andriy Vorobey 9680.132000–2008
Andriy Husin 9710.131993–2006

Most capped goalkeepers

As of 8 September 2021

RankPlayerGamesWinsGAAv GAPeriod
1 Andriy Pyatov 9949810.8182007–present
2 Oleksandr Shovkovskyi 9238800.871994–2012
3 Oleh Suslov 127151.251994–1997
4 Heorhiy Bushchan 113211.9092020–present
5 Vitaliy Reva 93101.1112001–2003
6 Andriy Dykan 85111.3752010–2012
Maksym Levytskyi 81101.252000–2002
8 Denys Boyko 73712014–present
Dmytro Tyapushkin 71111.5711994–1995
10 Valeriy Vorobyov 6320.3331994–1999
Andriy Lunin 62612018–present

Captains

As of 8 September 2021 [43]

RankPlayerCaptain CapsTotal CapsPeriod
1 Andriy Shevchenko 581111995–2012
2 Anatoliy Tymoshchuk 411442000–2016
3 Oleh Luzhny 39521992–2003
4 Ruslan Rotan 241002003–2018
5 Andriy Pyatov 21992007–present
6 Andriy Yarmolenko 151022009–present
7 Yuriy Kalitvintsev 13221995–1999
Oleksandr Holovko 13581995–2004
9 Oleksandr Shovkovskyi 12921994–2012
10 Oleksandr Kucher 8572006–2017

Competitive record

FIFA World Cup

 Champions   Runners-up    Third place    Fourth place  

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
YearRoundPositionPldWD*LGFGAPldWDLGFGA
1930 to 1990 as Part of Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 1930 to 1990 as Part of Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
as Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine as Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
Flag of the United States.svg 1994 FIFA member from 1992. Not admitted to the tournament. [lower-alpha 3] FIFA member from 1992. Not admitted to the tournament. [lower-alpha 3]
Flag of France.svg 1998 Did not qualify
12633119 1998
Flag of South Korea.svg Flag of Japan.svg 2002 124621513 2002
Flag of Germany.svg 2006 Quarter-finals8th52125712741187 2006
Flag of South Africa.svg 2010 Did not qualify12642217 2010
Flag of Brazil.svg 2014 12732307 2014
Flag of Russia.svg 2018 10523139 2018
Flag of Qatar.svg 2022 To be determined303033 2022
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Flag of Mexico.svg Flag of the United States.svg 2026 To be determined 2026
TotalQuarter-finals1/75212577235241311054
* Denotes draws include knock-out matches decided on penalty kicks.

UEFA European Championship

 Champions   Runners-up    Third place    Fourth place  

UEFA European Championship record Qualification record
YearRoundPositionPldWD*LGFGAPldWD*LGFGA
1960 to 1992 as Part of Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union and Flag of the CIS.svg  CIS 1960 to 1992 as Part of Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union and Flag of the CIS.svg  CIS
as Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine as Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
Flag of England.svg 1996 Did not qualify104151115 1996
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2000 12561167 2000
Flag of Portugal.svg 2004 82421110 2004
Flag of Austria.svg Flag of Switzerland.svg 2008 125251816 2008
Flag of Poland.svg Flag of Ukraine.svg 2012 Group stage12th310224Qualified as host nation
Flag of France.svg 2016 Group stage24th30030512723175 2016
Flag of Europe.svg 2020 Quarter-finals8th52036108620174 2020
Flag of Germany.svg 2024 To be determinedTo be determined
TotalQuarter-finals3/711308819622917169057

Qualifying campaigns

FIFA World Cup UEFA European Championship
1994  – Qualifying spot not granted by FIFA 1996  – 4th in Qualifying group 4
1998  – 2nd in Qualifying group 9, lost to Croatia in play-off 2000  – 2nd in Qualifying group 4, lost to Slovenia in play-off
2002  – 2nd in Qualifying group 5, lost to Germany in play-off 2004  – 3rd in Qualifying group 6
2006  Qualified for the tournament (1st in Qualifying group 2) 2008  – 4th in Qualifying group B
2010  – 2nd in Qualifying group 6, lost to Greece in play-off 2012  Qualified for the tournament (as a host nation)
2014  – 2nd in Qualifying group H, lost to France in play-off 2016  Qualified for the tournament (3rd in Qualifying group C, won over Slovenia in play-off)
2018  – 3rd in Qualifying group I 2020  Qualified for the tournament (Winner in Qualifying group B)

UEFA Nations League

UEFA Nations League record
YearDivisionGroupPldWDLGFGAP/RRK
Flag of Portugal.svg 2018–19 B 1 430155Green Arrow Up Darker.svg14th
Flag of Italy.svg 2020–21 A 4 6204513Decrease2.svg13th
Flag of None.svg 2022–23 B To be determined
Total10505101813th

Head-to-head record

World Map of Ukraine's opponents Ukraine national football team (matches with opponents).png
World Map of Ukraine's opponents

The following table shows Ukraine's all-time international record, correct as of 8 September 2021. [45] [46] [47]

Key
Positive balance (more wins)
Neutral balance (equal W/L ratio)
Negative balance (more losses)
AgainstConfederationPlayedWonDrawnLostGFGAGD
Flag of Albania.svg  Albania UEFA 6510134+9
Flag of Andorra.svg  Andorra UEFA 4400170+17
Flag of Armenia.svg  Armenia UEFA 8530178+9
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria UEFA 310245−1
Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan UEFA 211060+6
Flag of Bahrain.svg  Bahrain AFC 1010110
Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus UEFA 9531125+7
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil CONMEBOL 100102−2
Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria UEFA 532072+5
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon CAF 1010000
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada CONCACAF 1010220
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile CONMEBOL 110021+1
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica CONCACAF 110040+4
Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia UEFA 9135515−10
Flag of Cyprus.svg  Cyprus UEFA 421195+4
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic UEFA 522146−2
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark UEFA 3111220
Flag of England.svg  England UEFA 8125313−10
Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia UEFA 5500110+11
Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg  Faroe Islands UEFA 220070+7
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland UEFA 321042+2
Flag of France.svg  France UEFA 12156823−15
Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia UEFA 9630166+10
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany UEFA 8035717−10
Flag of Greece.svg  Greece UEFA 622243+1
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary UEFA 200225−3
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland UEFA 412134−1
Flag of Iran.svg  Iran AFC 100101−1
Flag of Israel.svg  Israel UEFA 623175+2
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy UEFA 8026315−12
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan AFC 320132+1
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan UEFA 6420126+6
Flag of Kosovo.svg  Kosovo UEFA 220050+5
Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia UEFA 321031+2
Flag of Libya.svg  Libya CAF 211041+3
Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania UEFA 10712208+12
Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg UEFA 5500121+11
Flag of Malta.svg  Malta UEFA 100101−1
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico CONCACAF 100112−1
Flag of Moldova.svg  Moldova UEFA 532063+3
Flag of Montenegro.svg  Montenegro UEFA 210141+3
Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco CAF 1010000
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands UEFA 301237−4
Flag of Niger.svg  Niger CAF 110021+1
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria CAF 1010220
Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland UEFA 632143+1
Flag of North Macedonia.svg  North Macedonia UEFA 531152+3
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway UEFA 541050+5
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland UEFA 9324911-2
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal UEFA 421143+1
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania UEFA 62131014−4
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia UEFA 211043+1
Flag of San Marino.svg  San Marino UEFA 2200170+17
Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg  Saudi Arabia AFC 211051+4
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland UEFA 2101330
Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia UEFA 7610163+13
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia UEFA 8332910–1
Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia UEFA 6132770
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea AFC 200203−3
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain UEFA 7115414−10
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden UEFA 431164+2
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland UEFA 312043+1
Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia CAF 110010+1
Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey UEFA 9234911−2
Flag of the United Arab Emirates.svg  United Arab Emirates AFC 1010110
Flag of the United States.svg  United States CONCACAF 431051+4
Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay CONMEBOL 100123−1
Flag of Uzbekistan.svg  Uzbekistan AFC 220041+3
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales UEFA 312032+1
Total5/62841308076393240+153

FIFA Ranking history

[48] [49]

199319941995199619971998199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010201120122013201420152016201720182019202020202021
9077715949472734454560574013301522345547182529303528242424

See also

Notes

  1. The Ukraine v Northern Ireland match, originally scheduled for 2 June 2020, at the NSK Olimpiyskiy, Kyiv was postponed due to the coronavirus. The match was later rescheduled to 3 June 2021.
  2. The Ukraine v Cyprus match, originally scheduled for 26 May 2020, at the Metalist Stadium, Kharkiv was postponed due to the coronavirus. The match was later rescheduled to 7 June 2021.
  3. 1 2 FIFA adopted a decision not to allow to participate in the 1994 FIFA World Cup the national teams of those former Soviet republic that did not participate in the qualification draw on 8 December 1991. [6] A proposition of Ukraine to arrange a separate tournament for all successors of the Soviet Union and supported by Georgia and Armenia was blocked by Russia. [44]

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