Ulric Oliver Thynne

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Colonel Ulric Oliver Thynne CMG, DSO, CVO (6 July 1871 – 30 September 1957) [1] [2] was a distinguished British soldier and champion polo player.

Order of St Michael and St George series of appointments of an order of chivalry of the United Kingdom

The Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George is a British order of chivalry founded on 28 April 1818 by George, Prince Regent, later King George IV, while he was acting as regent for his father, King George III.

Distinguished Service Order UK military decoration

The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) is a military decoration of the United Kingdom, and formerly of other parts of the Commonwealth, awarded for meritorious or distinguished service by officers of the armed forces during wartime, typically in actual combat. Since 1993 all ranks have been eligible.

Royal Victorian Order series of awards in an order of chivalry of the United Kingdom

The Royal Victorian Order is a dynastic order of knighthood established in 1896 by Queen Victoria. It recognises distinguished personal service to the monarch of the Commonwealth realms, members of the monarch's family, or to any viceroy or senior representative of the monarch. The present monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, is the Sovereign of the order, its motto is Victoria, and its official day is 20 June. The order's chapel is the Savoy Chapel in London.

Contents

Early life

Thynne was born on 6 July 1871. [1] He was the son of Rt. Hon. Lord Henry Frederick Thynne and Lady Ulrica Frederica Jane St. Maur Seymour. [1] He was educated at Charterhouse School, Godalming, Surrey, England and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, Berkshire, England. [1]

Charterhouse School English collegiate independent boarding school

Charterhouse is an independent day and boarding school in Godalming, Surrey. Founded by Thomas Sutton in 1611 on the site of the old Carthusian monastery in Charterhouse Square, Smithfield, London, it educates over 800 pupils, aged 13 to 18 years, and is one of the original Great Nine English public schools. Today pupils are still referred to as Carthusians, and ex-pupils as Old Carthusians.

Royal Military College, Sandhurst British Army military academy

The Royal Military College (RMC), founded in 1801 and established in 1802 at Great Marlow and High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire, England, but moved in October 1812 to Sandhurst, Berkshire, was a British Army military academy for training infantry and cavalry officers of the British and Indian Armies.

Career

Thynne gained the rank of Lieutenant in the service of the King's Royal Rifle Corps, [1] and fought in the Chitral Campaign in 1895. [1] He was appointed a lieutenant in the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry on 10 February 1900, [3] and fought with the Imperial Yeomanry during the Second Boer War in South Africa, where he was mentioned in despatches, [1] and for which he was appointed a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) in November 1900. [4] Following the war, he was promoted to Captain on 31 May 1902. [5] He fought in the First World War, during which he was again mentioned in despatches [1] and decorated with the award of Territorial Decoration (T.D.). [1] He was invested as a Companion, Order of St. Michael and St. George (C.M.G.) in 1918. [1] He was Colonel of the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry. [1] He gained the rank of Honorary Colonel in 1938 in the service of the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry. [1] He was invested as a Commander, Royal Victorian Order (C.V.O.) in 1946. [1]

Kings Royal Rifle Corps infantry rifle regiment of the British Army

The King's Royal Rifle Corps was an infantry rifle regiment of the British Army that was originally raised in British North America as the Royal American Regiment during the phase of the Seven Years' War in North America known as 'The French and Indian War.' Subsequently numbered the 60th Regiment of Foot, the regiment served for more than 200 years throughout the British Empire. In 1958, the regiment joined the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry and the Rifle Brigade in the Green Jackets Brigade and in 1966 the three regiments were formally amalgamated to become the Royal Green Jackets. The KRRC became the 2nd Battalion Royal Green Jackets. On the disbandment of 1/RGJ in 1992, the RGJ's KRRC battalion was redesignated as 1/RGJ, eventually becoming 2/RIFLES in 2007.

Chitral Expedition 1895 British military expedition

The Chitral Expedition was a military expedition in 1895 sent by the British authorities to relieve the fort at Chitral which was under siege after a local coup. After the death of the old ruler power changed hands several times. An intervening British force of about 400 men was besieged in the fort until it was relieved by two expeditions, a small one from Gilgit and a larger one from Peshawar.

Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry

The Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry (RWY) was a Yeomanry regiment of the Kingdom of Great Britain and the United Kingdom established in 1794. It was disbanded as an independent Territorial Army unit in 1967, a time when the strength of the Territorial Army was greatly reduced. The regiment lives on in B and Y Squadrons of the Royal Wessex Yeomanry.

In 1903 he won the Roehampton Trophy.

Peerage claim

In 1924, Thynne claimed the ancient Barony of Beauchamp from the House of Lords; the Committee for Privileges rejected the claim, holding that the evidence was insufficent to prove that the peerage was in fact created.

The titles Baron Beauchamp and Viscount Beauchamp have been created several times throughout English and British history. There is an extant Viscountcy of Beauchamp, held by the Marquesses of Hertford.

Committee for Privileges and Conduct

The Committee for Privileges and Conduct is a select committee of the House of Lords in the Parliament of the United Kingdom. The committee considers issues relating to the privileges of the House of Lords and its members, as well as having oversight for its members' conduct. The Committee for Privileges and Conduct is made up of sixteen members of the House, two of which must be former holders of high judicial office.

Family

He married, firstly, Marjory Wormald, daughter of Edward Wormald, on 16 May 1899. [1] The children of Colonel Ulric Oliver Thynne and Marjory Wormald are:

He married, secondly, Elspeth Stiven Tullis, daughter of David Tullis, on 19 December 1951. [1] He died on 30 September 1957 at age 86. [1]

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References

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