Uncial 083

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Uncial 083

New Testament manuscript

Text Mark 13; 14; 15-16; John 1; 2-4; 14
Date 6th/7th century
Script Greek
Now at Russian National Library
Size 28 by 26 cm
Type Alexandrian text-type
Category II

Uncial 083 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), ε 31 (Soden), is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated paleographically to the 6th/7th century. The codex now is located at the Russian National Library (Gr. 10) in Saint Petersburg. [1]

Manuscript document written by hand

A manuscript was, traditionally, any document that is written by hand -- or, once practical typewriters became available, typewritten -- as opposed to being mechanically printed or reproduced in some indirect or automated way. More recently, the term has come to be understood to further include any written, typed, or word-processed copy of an author's work, as distinguished from its rendition as a printed version of the same. Before the arrival of printing, all documents and books were manuscripts. Manuscripts are not defined by their contents, which may combine writing with mathematical calculations, maps, explanatory figures or illustrations. Manuscripts may be in book form, scrolls or in codex format. Illuminated manuscripts are enriched with pictures, border decorations, elaborately embossed initial letters or full-page illustrations. A document should be at least 75 years old to be considered a manuscript.

New Testament Second division of the Christian biblical canon

The New Testament is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible. The New Testament discusses the teachings and person of Jesus, as well as events in first-century Christianity. Christians regard both the Old and New Testaments together as sacred scripture. The New Testament has frequently accompanied the spread of Christianity around the world. It reflects and serves as a source for Christian theology and morality. Extended readings and phrases directly from the New Testament are incorporated into the various Christian liturgies. The New Testament has influenced religious, philosophical, and political movements in Christendom and left an indelible mark on literature, art, and music.

Saint Petersburg Federal city in Northwestern, Russia

Saint Petersburg is Russia's second-largest city after Moscow, with 5 million inhabitants in 2012, part of the Saint Petersburg agglomeration with a population of 6.2 million (2015). An important Russian port on the Baltic Sea, it has a status of a federal subject.

Contents

Description

The manuscript contains a small part of the Gospel of John 1:25-41; 2:9-4:14,34-49, on 6 parchment leaves (28 by 26 cm). The text is written in two columns per page, 25 lines per page, [1] in large uncial letters. [2] It has no accents, breathings, or punctuation. The text is divided according to the Ammonian Sections, with a references to the Eusebian Canons. The Old Testament quotations are marker on the margin by inverted comma (>>). [3]

Gospel of John Books of the New Testament

The Gospel of John is the fourth of the canonical gospels. The work is anonymous, although it identifies an unnamed "disciple whom Jesus loved" as the source of its traditions. It is closely related in style and content to the three Johannine epistles, and most scholars treat the four books, along with the Book of Revelation, as a single corpus of Johannine literature, albeit not from the same author.

Eusebian Canons

Eusebian canons, Eusebian sections or Eusebian apparatus, also known as Ammonian sections, are the system of dividing the four Gospels used between late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. The divisions into chapters and verses used in modern texts date only from the 13th and 16th centuries, respectively. The sections are indicated in the margin of nearly all Greek and Latin manuscripts of the Bible, and usually summarized in Canon Tables at the start of the Gospels. There are about 1165 sections: 355 for Matthew, 235 for Mark, 343 for Luke, and 232 for John; the numbers, however, vary slightly in different manuscripts.

Currently it is dated by the INTF to the 6th or 7th century. [1] [4]

It came from the same codex as manuscript Uncial 0112. It contains Gospel of Mark 14:29-45; 15:27-16:8, and the shorter Markan ending on 4 leaves. It was found by J. Rendel Harris. [5] Harris published its text. [6] It is now located at the Saint Catherine's Monastery, Sinai Harris (12, 4 ff.).

Gospel of Mark Books of the New Testament

The Gospel According to Mark is one of the four canonical gospels and one of the three synoptic gospels. It tells of the ministry of Jesus from his baptism by John the Baptist to his death and burial and the discovery of the empty tomb – there is no genealogy of Jesus or birth narrative, nor, in the original ending at chapter 16, any post-resurrection appearances of Jesus. It portrays Jesus as a heroic man of action, an exorcist, a healer, and a miracle worker. Jesus is also the Son of God, but he keeps his identity secret, concealing it in parables so that even most of the disciples fail to understand. All this is in keeping with prophecy, which foretold the fate of the messiah as suffering servant. The gospel ends, in its original version, with the discovery of the empty tomb, a promise to meet again in Galilee, and an unheeded instruction to spread the good news of the resurrection.

Mark 16 Gospel according to Mark, chapter 16

Mark 16 is the final chapter of the Gospel of Mark in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. It begins with the discovery of the empty tomb by Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James, and Salome. There they encounter a young man dressed in white who announces the Resurrection of Jesus. The two oldest manuscripts of Mark 16 then conclude with verse 8, which ends with the women fleeing from the empty tomb, and saying "nothing to anyone, because they were too frightened."

James Rendel Harris was an English biblical scholar and curator of manuscripts, who was instrumental in bringing back to light many Syriac Scriptures and other early documents. His contacts at the Saint Catherine's Monastery on Mount Sinai in Egypt enabled twin sisters Agnes Smith Lewis and Margaret Dunlop Gibson to discover there the Sinaitic Palimpsest, the oldest Syriac New Testament document in existence. He subsequently accompanied them on a second trip, with Robert Bensly and Francis Crawford Burkitt, to decipher the palimpsest. He himself discovered there other manuscripts. Harris's Biblical Fragments from Mount Sinai appeared in 1890. He was a Quaker.

From the same codex as manuscript Uncial 0235. It contains Gospel of Mark 13:12-14.16-19.21-24.26-28 on 1 leaf (fragments). The fragment is located now in the Russian National Library (O. 149) in Saint Petersburg. [1]

Text

The Greek text of this codex is a representative of the Alexandrian text-type, with some alien readings. Kurt Aland placed it to Category II. [1]

Codex book with handwritten content

A codex, plural codices, is a book constructed of a number of sheets of paper, vellum, papyrus, or similar materials. The term is now usually only used of manuscript books, with hand-written contents, but describes the format that is now near-universal for printed books in the Western world. The book is usually bound by stacking the pages and fixing one edge to a bookbinding, which may just be thicker paper, or with stiff boards, called a hardback, or in elaborate historical examples a treasure binding.

Alexandrian text-type

The Alexandrian text-type, associated with Alexandria, is one of several text-types used in New Testament textual criticism to describe and group the textual characters of biblical manuscripts.

Kurt Aland German Theologian

Kurt Aland, was a German theologian and biblical scholar who specialized in New Testament textual criticism. He founded the Institut für neutestamentliche Textforschung in Münster and served as its first director from 1959–83. He was one of the principal editors of Nestle-Aland – Novum Testamentum Graece for the Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft and The Greek New Testament for the United Bible Societies.

It contains Mark 15:28. [7]

In John 1:28 it has textual variant Βηθαβαρα together with the manuscripts C2 K, Ψ, 0113, f1, f13 and Byz. Other manuscripts have βηθανια. [8]

In John 3:12 it has textual variant πιστευετε (you believe) – instead of πιστευσετε (you will believe) – together with the manuscripts Papyrus 75 and Uncial 050. [9]

See also

Related Research Articles

Uncial 064 designated by, ε 10, is a Greek uncial codex of the New Testament, on parchment leaves. Formerly it was labelled by Θe. Palimpsest.

Codex Macedoniensis manuscript

Codex Macedoniensis or Macedonianus designated by Y or 034, ε 073, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the Gospels, dated palaeographically to the 9th century. The manuscript is lacunose.

Uncial 050

Uncial 050, Cι1, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, written on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 9th-century. Formerly it was labelled by O or We.

Uncial 059

Uncial 059, ε 09 (Soden), is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated paleographically to the 4th or 5th century.

Uncial 073

Uncial 073, ε 7 (Soden), is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated palaeographically to the 6th century.

Uncial 089 in the Gregory-Aland numbering), ε 28 (Soden), is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated paleographically to the 6th century. The codex now is located at the Russian National Library in Saint Petersburg. It came to Russia from Sinai.

Uncial 091 in the Gregory-Aland numbering), ε 30 (Soden), is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated paleographically to the 6th-century.

Uncial 099, ε 47 (Soden); is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, assigned paleographically to the 7th-century.

Codex Tischendorfianus I, designated by Uncial 0106, ε 40 (Soden), is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament on parchment. It is dated palaeographically to the 7th-century. The manuscript is fragmentary.

Uncial 0118, ε 62 (Soden); is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated paleographically to the 8th-century.

Uncial 0136, ε 91 (Soden), is a Greek-Arabic diglot uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated palaeographically to the 9th century. Formerly it was labelled by Θh.

Minuscule 392, Θε23 (Soden), is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Paleographically it has been assigned to the 12th century. It has marginalia.

Minuscule 713, ε351, is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 12th century. The manuscript is lacunose. Frederick Henry Ambrose Scrivener labelled it as 561e.

Minuscule 846, Νλ29, is a 14th-century Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament on parchment. The manuscript has no complex content.

Minuscule 847 is a 12th-century Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament on parchment. The manuscript has no complex content.

Minuscule 994 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), A227 Cι33 (von Soden), is a 10th or 11th-century Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament on parchment. The manuscript has not survived in complete condition. It has some marginalia.

Lectionary 312 (Gregory-Aland), designated by siglum 312 is a Greek manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 9th-century. The manuscript has survived in a fragmentary condition.

Lectionary 317 (Gregory-Aland), designated by siglum 317 is a Greek manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 9th century. The manuscript has survived in a fragmentary condition.

Lectionary 338 (Gregory-Aland), designated by siglum 338 is a Greek manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 10th-century. The manuscript has not survived in complete condition.

Lectionary 339 (Gregory-Aland), designated by siglum 339 is a Greek manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 13th-century. The manuscript has not survived in complete condition.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Aland, Kurt; Aland, Barbara (1995). The Text of the New Testament: An Introduction to the Critical Editions and to the Theory and Practice of Modern Textual Criticism. Erroll F. Rhodes (trans.). Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. p. 120. ISBN   978-0-8028-4098-1.
  2. Gregory, Caspar René (1900). Textkritik des Neuen Testaments. 1. Leipzig: Hinrichs. p. 67.
  3. Rendel Harris, Biblical fragments from Mount Sinai (1890), pp. XIII.
  4. "Liste Handschriften". Münster: Institute for New Testament Textual Research. Retrieved 25 April 2011.
  5. Gregory, Caspar René (1900). Textkritik des Neuen Testaments. 1. Leipzig: Hinrichs. p. 96.
  6. Rendel Harris, Biblical fragments from Mount Sinai (1890), pp. 48-52.
  7. NA26, p. 144.
  8. NA26, p. 249.
  9. NA26, p. 253.

Further reading