Uncial 091

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Uncial 091

New Testament manuscript

Text John 6 †
Date 6th-century
Script Greek
Now at Russian National Library
Size 32 x 28 cm
Type Alexandrian text-type
Category II

Uncial 091 in the Gregory-Aland numbering), ε 30 (Soden), [1] is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated paleographically to the 6th-century. [2]

Manuscript document written by hand

A manuscript was, traditionally, any document that is written by hand -- or, once practical typewriters became available, typewritten -- as opposed to being mechanically printed or reproduced in some indirect or automated way. More recently, the term has come to be understood to further include any written, typed, or word-processed copy of an author's work, as distinguished from its rendition as a printed version of the same. Before the arrival of printing, all documents and books were manuscripts. Manuscripts are not defined by their contents, which may combine writing with mathematical calculations, maps, explanatory figures or illustrations. Manuscripts may be in book form, scrolls or in codex format. Illuminated manuscripts are enriched with pictures, border decorations, elaborately embossed initial letters or full-page illustrations. A document should be at least 75 years old to be considered a manuscript.

New Testament Second division of the Christian biblical canon

The New Testament is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible. The New Testament discusses the teachings and person of Jesus, as well as events in first-century Christianity. Christians regard both the Old and New Testaments together as sacred scripture. The New Testament has frequently accompanied the spread of Christianity around the world. It reflects and serves as a source for Christian theology and morality. Extended readings and phrases directly from the New Testament are incorporated into the various Christian liturgies. The New Testament has influenced religious, philosophical, and political movements in Christendom and left an indelible mark on literature, art, and music.

Contents

Description

The codex contains a small parts of the Gospel of John 6:13-14.22-24, on one parchment leaf (32 cm by 28 cm). [2] The leaf survived in 3/4. The text is written in two columns per page, 23 lines per page, in large uncial letters. Letter iota is written with diaeresis. [3]

Gospel of John Books of the New Testament

The Gospel of John is the fourth of the canonical gospels. The work is anonymous, although it identifies an unnamed "disciple whom Jesus loved" as the source of its traditions. It is closely related in style and content to the three Johannine epistles, and most scholars treat the four books, along with the Book of Revelation, as a single corpus of Johannine literature, albeit not from the same author.

Iota is the ninth letter of the Greek alphabet. It was derived from the Phoenician letter Yodh. Letters that arose from this letter include the Latin I and J, the Cyrillic І, Yi, and Je, and iotated letters.

The diaeresis and the umlaut are two homoglyphic diacritical marks that consist of two dots ( ¨ ) placed over a letter, usually a vowel. When that letter is an i or a j, the diacritic replaces the tittle: ï.

The Greek text of this codex is a representative of the Alexandrian text-type with some alien readings. Aland placed it in Category II. [2]

Codex book with handwritten content

A codex, plural codices, is a book constructed of a number of sheets of paper, vellum, papyrus, or similar materials. The term is now usually only used of manuscript books, with hand-written contents, but describes the format that is now near-universal for printed books in the Western world. The book is usually bound by stacking the pages and fixing one edge to a bookbinding, which may just be thicker paper, or with stiff boards, called a hardback, or in elaborate historical examples a treasure binding.

Alexandrian text-type

The Alexandrian text-type, associated with Alexandria, is one of several text-types used in New Testament textual criticism to describe and group the textual characters of biblical manuscripts.

Kurt Aland German Theologian

Kurt Aland, was a German theologian and biblical scholar who specialized in New Testament textual criticism. He founded the Institut für neutestamentliche Textforschung in Münster and served as its first director from 1959–83. He was one of the principal editors of Nestle-Aland – Novum Testamentum Graece for the Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft and The Greek New Testament for the United Bible Societies.

In John 6:23 the reading ευχαριστησαντος του κυριου (the Lord had given thanks) is omitted, as in codices D, a, d, e, syrc, syrs, arm, geo1. [4]

Codex Bezae Handwritten copy of the Bible in Greek

The Codex Bezae Cantabrigensis, designated by siglum Dea or 05, δ 5, is a codex of the New Testament dating from the 5th century written in an uncial hand on vellum. It contains, in both Greek and Latin, most of the four Gospels and Acts, with a small fragment of 3 John. Written one column per page, the codex contains 406 extant parchment leaves measuring 26 x 21.5 cm, with the Greek text on the left face and the Latin text on the right. A digital facsimile of the codex is available from Cambridge University Library, which holds the manuscript.

The title Codex Vercellensis Evangeliorum refers to two manuscript codices preserved in the cathedral library of Vercelli, in the Piedmont Region, Italy.

The Codex Palatinus, designated by e or 2, is a 5th-century Latin Gospel Book. The text, written on purple dyed vellum in gold and silver ink, is a version of the old Latin. Most of the manuscript was in the Austrian National Library at Vienna until 1919, when it was transferred to Trento, where it is now being kept as Ms 1589 in the Library of Buonconsiglio Castle. Two leaves were separated from the manuscript in the 18th century: one is now in the library of Trinity College, Dublin, the other in the British Library at London.

Currently it is dated by the INTF to the 6th-century. [2] [5]

The codex now is located at the Russian National Library (Gr. 279) [6] in Saint Petersburg. [2]

Saint Petersburg Federal city in Northwestern, Russia

Saint Petersburg is Russia's second-largest city after Moscow, with 5 million inhabitants in 2012, part of the Saint Petersburg agglomeration with a population of 6.2 million (2015). An important Russian port on the Baltic Sea, it has a status of a federal subject.

See also

Related Research Articles

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Uncial 099, ε 47 (Soden); is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, assigned paleographically to the 7th-century.

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References

  1. Gregory, Caspar René (1908). Die griechischen Handschriften des Neuen Testament. Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs'sche Buchhandlung. p. 39.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Aland, Kurt; Aland, Barbara (1995). The Text of the New Testament: An Introduction to the Critical Editions and to the Theory and Practice of Modern Textual Criticism. Erroll F. Rhodes (trans.). Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. p. 120. ISBN   978-0-8028-4098-1.
  3. C. R. Gregory, "Textkritik des Neuen Testaments", Leipzig 1900, vol. 1, p. 89.
  4. UBS3, pp. 344-345
  5. "Liste Handschriften". Münster: Institute for New Testament Textual Research. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  6. Uncial 089 has a catalogue number Gr. 280 in the same library.

Further reading