Uncompahgre Peak

Last updated
Uncompahgre Peak
Uncompahgre peak.jpg
Uncompahgre Peak from the west
Highest point
Elevation 14,321 ft (4365.0 m) [1]
NAVD88
Prominence 4277 ft (1304 m) [2]
Isolation 85.0 mi (136.8 km) [2]
Listing
Coordinates 38°04′18″N107°27′44″W / 38.0716581°N 107.4620893°W / 38.0716581; -107.4620893 Coordinates: 38°04′18″N107°27′44″W / 38.0716581°N 107.4620893°W / 38.0716581; -107.4620893 [1]
Geography
USA Colorado location map.svg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Uncompahgre Peak
Location High point of Hinsdale County, Colorado, United States [2]
Parent range Highest summit of the
San Juan Mountains [2]
Topo map USGS 7.5' topographic map
Uncompahgre Peak, Colorado [3]
Climbing
Easiest route Hike (class 2)

Uncompahgre Peak ( /ənkəmˈpɑːɡr/ ( Loudspeaker.svg listen )) is the sixth highest summit of the Rocky Mountains of North America and the U.S. state of Colorado. The prominent 14,321-foot (4365.0 m) fourteener is the highest summit of the San Juan Mountains and the highest point in the drainage basin of the Colorado River and the Gulf of California. It is located in the Uncompahgre Wilderness in the northern San Juans, in northern Hinsdale County approximately 7 miles (11 km) west of the town of Lake City.

Contents

Uncompahgre Peak has a broad summit plateau, rising about 1,500 ft (500 m) above the broad surrounding alpine basins. The south, east and west sides are not particularly steep, but the north face has a 700 ft (210 m) cliff. Like all peaks in the San Juan Mountains, Uncompahgre is of volcanic origin, but is not a volcano. The rock is of poor quality for climbing, precluding an ascent of the north face.

The most popular route for climbing Uncompahgre Peak is Uncompahgre National Forest Service Trail Number 239, which starts from the end of the Nellie Creek Road, east-southeast of the peak. The Nellie Creek Road is a four wheel drive road accessed from the Henson Creek Road, about 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Lake City. The trail to the summit is a strenuous hike rising 2,919 ft (890 m) in elevation in about 3.5 mi (6 km). It accesses the summit in a winding ascent, starting from the east, passing over a south-trending ridge, and finishing on the west slopes of the summit plateau. [4]

The peak's name comes from the Ute word Uncompaghre, which loosely translates to "dirty water" or "red water spring" and is likely a reference to the many hot springs in the vicinity of Ouray, Colorado. [lower-alpha 1]

Uncompahgre Peak (center) and the San Juans from Slumgullion Pass, July 2002 Slumgullion Pass.jpg
Uncompahgre Peak (center) and the San Juans from Slumgullion Pass, July 2002

Historical names

See also

Related Research Articles

San Juan Mountains

The San Juan Mountains are a high and rugged mountain range in the Rocky Mountains in southwestern Colorado and northwestern New Mexico. The area is highly mineralized and figured in the gold and silver mining industry of early Colorado. Major towns, all old mining camps, include Creede, Lake City, Silverton, Ouray, and Telluride. Large scale mining has ended in the region, although independent prospectors still work claims throughout the range. The last large scale mines were the Sunnyside Mine near Silverton, which operated until late in the 20th century and the Idarado Mine on Red Mountain Pass that closed down in the 1970s. Famous old San Juan mines include the Camp Bird and Smuggler Union mines, both located between Telluride and Ouray.

Uncompahgre River

The Uncompahgre River is a tributary of the Gunnison River, approximately 75 mi (121 km) long, in southwestern Colorado in the United States. Lake Como at 12,215 ft (3723m) in northern San Juan County, in the Uncompahgre National Forest in the northwestern San Juan Mountains is the headwaters of the river. It flows northwest past Ouray, Ridgway, Montrose, and Olathe and joins the Gunnison at Confluence Park in Delta.

Grays Peak

Grays Peak is the tenth-highest summit of the Rocky Mountains of North America and the U.S. state of Colorado. The prominent 14,278-foot (4352 m) fourteener is the highest summit of the Front Range and the highest point on the Continental Divide in North America. Grays Peak is located in Arapahoe National Forest, 3.9 miles (6.2 km) southeast by east of Loveland Pass on the Continental Divide between Clear Creek and Summit counties. The peak is the highest point in both counties.

Mount of the Holy Cross

Mount of the Holy Cross is a high and prominent mountain summit in the northern Sawatch Range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 14,011-foot (4270.5 m) fourteener is located in the Holy Cross Wilderness of White River National Forest, 6.6 miles (10.7 km) west-southwest of the Town of Red Cliff in Eagle County, Colorado, United States. The summit of Mount of the Holy Cross is the highest point in Eagle County and the northern Sawatch Range.

Blanca Peak

Blanca Peak is the fourth highest summit of the Rocky Mountains of North America and the U.S. state of Colorado. The ultra-prominent 14,351-foot (4,374 m) peak is the highest summit of the Sierra Blanca Massif, the Sangre de Cristo Range, and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. The fourteener is located 9.6 miles (15.5 km) north by east of the Town of Blanca, on the drainage divide separating Rio Grande National Forest and Alamosa County from the Sangre de Cristo Land Grant and Costilla County. The summit is the highest point of both counties and the entire drainage basin of the Rio Grande. Below the steep North Face of Blanca Peak two live Glaciers once developed, until extinction sometime after 1903. North & South Blanca Glaciers were located at 37° 35N.,longitude 105° 28W. Blanca Peak is higher than any point in the United States east of its longitude.

Mount Antero

Mount Antero is the highest summit of the southern Sawatch Range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The prominent 14,276-foot (4351.4 m) fourteener is located in San Isabel National Forest, 12.2 miles (19.6 km) southwest by south of the Town of Buena Vista in Chaffee County, Colorado, United States. The mountain is named in honor of Chief Antero of the Uintah band of the Ute people.

Uncompahgre Plateau

The Uncompahgre Plateau in western Colorado is a distinctive large uplift part of the Colorado Plateau. Uncompahgre is a Ute word that describes the water: "Dirty Water" or "Rocks that make Water Red".

Wetterhorn Peak

Wetterhorn Peak is a fourteen thousand foot mountain peak in the U.S. state of Colorado. It is located in the Uncompahgre Wilderness of the northern San Juan Mountains, in northwestern Hinsdale County and southeastern Ouray County, 9 miles (14 km) east of the town of Ouray. It lies 2.75 mi (4.4 km) west of Uncompahgre Peak.

Wilson Peak

Wilson Peak is a 14,023-foot (4,274 m) mountain peak in the U.S. state of Colorado. It is located in the Lizard Head Wilderness of the Uncompahgre National Forest, in the northwestern San Juan Mountains. It is the highest point in San Miguel County.

Mount Wilson (Colorado)

Mount Wilson is the highest summit of the San Miguel Mountains range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The prominent 14,252-foot (4,344 m) fourteener is located in the Lizard Head Wilderness of San Juan National Forest, 10.6 miles (17.1 km) north by east of the Town of Rico in Dolores County, Colorado, United States. Mount Wilson should not to be confused with the lower Wilson Peak nearby.

Mount Eolus Mountain in Colorado, United States

Mount Eolus is a high mountain summit of the Needle Mountains range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 14,090-foot (4,295 m) fourteener is located in the Weminuche Wilderness of San Juan National Forest, 27.4 miles (44.1 km) northeast by north of the City of Durango in La Plata County, Colorado, United States.

Windom Peak

Windom Peak is the highest summit of the Needle Mountains range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The prominent 14,093-foot (4,296 m) fourteener is located in the Weminuche Wilderness of San Juan National Forest, 28.2 miles (45.4 km) northeast by north of the City of Durango in La Plata County, Colorado, United States. The summit of Windom Peak is the highest point in La Plata County and the entire San Juan River drainage basin. The mountain was named in honor of Minnesota senator William Windom.

Sunlight Peak

Sunlight Peak is a high mountain summit of the Needle Mountains range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 14,065-foot (4,287 m) fourteener is located in the Weminuche Wilderness of San Juan National Forest, 28.5 miles (45.8 km) northeast by north of the City of Durango in La Plata County, Colorado, United States.

San Luis Peak

San Luis Peak is the highest summit of the La Garita Mountains range in the Rocky Mountains of North America. The prominent 14,022-foot (4273.8 m) fourteener is located in the Gunnison National Forest portion of the La Garita Wilderness in Saguache County approximately 10 miles (16 km) north of Creede. It is situated rather far to the east of the other fourteeners in the San Juans, and has more of a wilderness setting than many of the others.

Domínguez–Escalante expedition

The Domínguez–Escalante expedition was a Spanish journey of exploration conducted in 1776 by two Franciscan priests, Atanasio Domínguez and Silvestre Vélez de Escalante, to find an overland route from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to their Roman Catholic mission in Monterey, on the coast of modern day central California. Domínguez, Vélez de Escalante, and Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco, acting as the expedition's cartographer, traveled with ten men from Santa Fe through many unexplored portions of the American West, including present-day western Colorado, Utah, and northern Arizona. Along part of the journey, they were aided by three indigenous guides of the Timpanogos tribe.

Lizard Head

Lizard Head is a mountain summit in the San Miguel Mountains range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 13,119-foot (3,999 m) thirteener is located in the Lizard Head Wilderness, 6.8 miles (11.0 km) west by south of the Town of Ophir, Colorado, United States, on the drainage divide separating San Juan National Forest and Dolores County from Uncompahgre National Forest and San Miguel County.

Matterhorn Peak (Colorado)

Matterhorn Peak is a high mountain summit in the San Juan Mountains range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 13,596-foot (4,144 m) thirteener is located in the Uncompahgre Wilderness of Uncompahgre National Forest, 10.3 miles (16.6 km) west by north of the Town of Lake City in Hinsdale County, Colorado, United States.

Gladstone Peak

Gladstone Peak is a high mountain summit in the San Miguel Mountains range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 13,919-foot (4,243 m) thirteener is located in the Lizard Head Wilderness, 11.2 miles (18.0 km) southwest by west of the Town of Telluride, Colorado, United States, on the drainage divide separating San Juan National Forest and Dolores County from Uncompahgre National Forest and San Miguel County. The mountain was named in honor of British Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone.

Horsefly Peak

Horsefly Peak is the highest summit of the Uncompahgre Plateau in the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 10,353-foot (3,156 m) peak is located 10.0 miles (16.1 km) west by north of the Town of Ridgway in Ouray County, Colorado, United States.

References

  1. 1 2 "UNCOMPAHGRE". NGS data sheet. U.S. National Geodetic Survey . Retrieved January 2, 2016.
  2. 1 2 3 4 "Uncompahgre Peak, Colorado". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved January 2, 2016.
  3. 1 2 "Uncompahgre Peak". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved November 14, 2014.
  4. Louis W. Dawson II. Dawson's Guide to Colorado's Fourteeners, Volume 2. Blue Clover Press. pp.  115–126. ISBN   0-9628867-2-6.
  5. Jarom McDonald (ed.). "The itinerary and diary of Francisco Atanasio Domínguez and Francisco Silvestre Vélez de Escalante". Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities. Archived from the original on 2011-09-28. Retrieved 2013-01-27.

Notes

  1. In the journal of Francisco Silvestre Vélez de Escalante's 1776 expedition [5] the author states that the Native American name for the Uncompahgre River was Ancapagari, which translated to Spanish as Laguna Colorado and referred to a hot, bad tasting, red lake from which its waters came. The Spanish name for the river at that time was Rio de San Francisco, apparently so named by explorer Juan Maria de Rivera on one of his two earlier expeditions (1761 and 1765).