Undertones of War

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Undertones of War
Author Edmund Blunden
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Genre Memoir
PublisherR. Cobden-Sanderson
Publication date
1928

Undertones of War is a 1928 memoir of the First World War, written by English poet Edmund Blunden. As with two other famous war memoirs-—Siegfried Sassoon's Sherston trilogy , and Robert Graves' Good-Bye to All That --Undertones represents Blunden's first prose publication, [1] and was one of the earliest contributors to the flurry of Great War books to come out of England in the late 1920s and early 1930s. [2]

Contents

Synopsis

Paul Fussell has called Undertones of War an "extended elegy in prose," [3] and critics have commented on its lack of central narrative. Like Henri Barbusse's Under Fire and Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front , the text presents a series of war-related episodes rather than a distinct, teleological narrative.

Reviews

According to Paul Fussell, in Blunden's “writing about horror and violence, understatement delivers the point more effectively than either idealism or heavy emphasis.” [4] G.S. Fraser, meanwhile, has called the text "the best war poem," despite its prose form, and went so far as to print sections as poetry in the London Magazine. [5]

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References

  1. Fussell, Paul (1975). The Great War and Modern Memory . New York: Oxford University Press. p.  310. ISBN   9780195133325.
  2. Bostridge, Mark (2014). Vera Brittain and the First World War. London: Bloomsbury. p. 125. ISBN   9781408188446.
  3. Fussell, Paul (1975). The Great War and Modern Memory . New York: Oxford University Press. p.  254. ISBN   9780195133325.
  4. Fussell, Paul (1975). The Great War and Modern Memory . New York: Oxford University Press. p.  339. ISBN   9780195133325.
  5. Fussell, Paul (1975). The Great War and Modern Memory . New York: Oxford University Press. p.  254. ISBN   9780195133325.