Unhung County

Last updated
Unhŭng County
운흥군
County
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl
   Hancha
   McCune-Reischauer Unhŭng-gun
   Revised Romanization Unheung-gun
DPRK2006 Ryanggang-Unhung.PNG
Map of Ryanggang showing the location of Unhung
Country North Korea
Province Ryanggang
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 10 workers' districts, 10 ri
Area
  Total934 km2 (361 sq mi)
Population (1991 est.)
  Total100,000
  Density110/km2 (280/sq mi)

Unhŭng County is a kun, or county, in Ryanggang Province, North Korea. It was created following the division of Korea from portions of Hyesan and Kapsan.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

Ryanggang Province Province in Kwannam, North Korea

Ryanggang Province is a province in North Korea. The province is bordered by China (Jilin) on the north, North Hamgyong on the east, South Hamgyong on the south, and Chagang on the west. Ryanggang was formed in 1954, when it was separated from South Hamgyŏng. The provincial capital is Hyesan. In South Korean usage, "Ryanggang" is spelled and pronounced as "Yanggang"

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia, under Gwanggaeto the Great. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers; it is bordered to the south by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Contents

Geography

Unhŭng lies on the southwest edge of the Paektu lava plateau, among the Paektu Mountains. The highest of its many peaks is Taegakpong. The chief streams are the Unch'ong River (운총강), Osich'ŏn (오시천) and Taedongch'ŏn (대동천). Some 86% of the county's area is forested.

Administrative divisions

Unhŭng county is divided into 1 ŭp (town), 10 rodongjagu (workers' districts) and 10 ri (villages):

  • Unhŭng-ŭp (운흥읍)
  • Ilgŏl-lodongjagu (일건로동자구)
  • Namjung-rodongjagu (남중로동자구)
  • Ryongam-rodongjagu (룡암로동자구)
  • Ryŏngha-rodongjagu (령하로동자구)
  • Ryongp'o-rodongjagu (룡포로동자구)
  • Saengjang-rodongjagu (생장로동자구)
  • Taedong-rodongjagu (대동로동자구)
  • Taedŏng-rodongjagu (대덕로동자구)
  • Taejŏnp'yŏng-rodongjagu (대전평로동자구)
  • Taeosich'ŏl-lodongjagu (대오시천로동자구)
  • Cham'ul-li (잠운리)
  • Changhang-ri (장항리)
  • Pog'am-ri (복안리)
  • Sangsal-li (상산리)
  • Simp'o-ri (심포리)
  • Sinjung-ri (신중리)
  • Taeha-ri (대하리)
  • Taejung-ri (대중리)
  • Tongp'o-ri (동포리)
  • Tongp'yŏng-ri (동평리)

Economy

There is relatively little agriculture, except for dry-field farms producing potatoes, wheat and soybeans. Logging is the chief industry, with lumber processing the dominant form of manufacturing. There are also mines, extracting the local deposits of copper, iron sulphide, lead, kaolin and tungsten.

Transportation

Unhŭng is served by road and rail; the Paektusan Ch'ŏngnyŏn Line of the Korean State Railway passes through the county.

Korean State Railway

The Korean State Railway is the operating arm of the Ministry of Railways of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and has its headquarters at P'yŏngyang. The current Minister of Railways is Jang Hyuk, who has held the position since 2015.

See also

Geography of North Korea

North Korea is located in east Asia on the northern half of the Korean Peninsula.

Korean language Language spoken in Korea

The Korean language is an East Asian language spoken by about 80 million people. It is a member of the Koreanic language family and is the official and national language of both Koreas: North Korea and South Korea, with different standardized official forms used in each country. It is also one of the two official languages in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County of Jilin province, China. Historical and modern linguists classify Korean as a language isolate; however, it does have a few extinct relatives, which together with Korean itself and the Jeju language form the Koreanic language family. This implies that Korean is not an isolate, but a member of a micro-family. The idea that Korean belongs to the controversial Altaic language family is discredited in academic research. Korean is agglutinative in its morphology and SOV in its syntax.

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