Union County, New Mexico

Last updated

Union County
Union County Court House.jpg
Map of New Mexico highlighting Union County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of New Mexico
New Mexico in United States.svg
New Mexico's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°29′N103°28′W / 36.48°N 103.47°W / 36.48; -103.47
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of New Mexico.svg  New Mexico
FoundedJanuary 1, 1894
Seat Clayton
Largest townClayton
Area
  Total3,831 sq mi (9,920 km2)
  Land3,824 sq mi (9,900 km2)
  Water7.1 sq mi (18 km2)  0.2%%
Population
  Estimate 
(2019)
4,059
  Density1.2/sq mi (0.5/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain)
  Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
Congressional district 3rd
Website unionnm.us

Union County is the northeasternmost county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,549, [1] making it the fourth-least populous county in New Mexico. Its county seat is Clayton. [2] The county was formed in 1894. [3] Union County borders Colorado to the north, and Oklahoma and Texas to the east.

Contents

History

Union County, was created by an act of the territorial legislation in 1893 and was officially recognized on January 1, 1894, when the first slate of elected county officials received their oaths of office. The county is named “Union” because the citizens were united in their desire for the creation of a new county out of three existing New Mexico counties. Union County was subsequently “carved up” by the creation of additional counties, Quay in 1903 and Harding in 1920. At one time, Union County had a population of over 20,000. There were a number of bustling communities such as Amistad, Hayden, Sedan, Pasamonte, Gladstone, Mt Dora, Grenville, Des Moines, Folsom, and Dedman (now known as Capulin).

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 3,831 square miles (9,920 km2), of which 3,824 square miles (9,900 km2) is land and 7.1 square miles (18 km2) (0.2%) is water. [4]

Adjacent counties

Union County is one of the few counties in the U.S. to border counties from four different states. One of its neighbors is Cimarron County, Oklahoma, the only US county to border counties from five different states.

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1910 11,404
1920 16,68046.3%
1930 11,036−33.8%
1940 9,095−17.6%
1950 7,372−18.9%
1960 6,068−17.7%
1970 4,925−18.8%
1980 4,725−4.1%
1990 4,124−12.7%
2000 4,1741.2%
2010 4,5499.0%
2019 (est.)4,059 [5] −10.8%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790-1960 [7] 1900-1990 [8]
1990-2000 [9] 2010-2016 [1]

2000 census

As of the 2000 census, [10] there were 4,174 people, 1,733 households, and 1,176 families living in the county. The population density was 1.1 people per square mile (0.4/km2). There were 2,225 housing units at an average density of 1 per square mile (0/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 80.38% White, 0.96% Native American, 0.34% Asian, 0.12% Pacific Islander, 16.00% from other races, and 2.20% from two or more races. 35.10% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,733 households, out of which 31.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.70% were married couples living together, 9.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.10% were non-families. 30.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 27.30% under the age of 18, 6.30% from 18 to 24, 24.60% from 25 to 44, 24.10% from 45 to 64, and 17.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 97.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,080, and the median income for a family was $35,313. Males had a median income of $26,364 versus $18,711 for females. The per capita income for Union county was $14,700. About 14.20% of families and 18.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 31.40% of those under age 18 and 8.30% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 census, there were 4,549 people, 1,695 households, and 1,073 families living in the county. [11] The population density was 1.2 inhabitants per square mile (0.46/km2). There were 2,305 housing units at an average density of 0.6 per square mile (0.23/km2). [12] The racial makeup of the county was 81.7% white, 2.0% American Indian, 1.8% black or African American, 0.5% Asian, 11.7% from other races, and 2.3% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 39.7% of the population. [11] In terms of ancestry, 13.6% were German, 10.3% were Irish, 7.4% were English, and 7.0% were American. [13]

Of the 1,695 households, 28.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.8% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 36.7% were non-families, and 33.2% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 2.90. The median age was 40.9 years. [11]

The median income for a household in the county was $39,975 and the median income for a family was $41,687. Males had a median income of $29,388 versus $23,333 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,228. About 6.9% of families and 9.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.5% of those under age 18 and 9.3% of those age 65 or over. [14]

Communities

Town

Villages

Census-designated place

Other communities

Politics

Like all of Eastern New Mexico, Union County is heavily Republican. The county has not voted for a Democratic presidential candidate since 1948. Hillary Clinton in 2016 received the worst showing for a Democrat in the county's history – but this was partially due to a large migration towards third party candidates such as New Mexico native and former governor Gary Johnson, who ran as a libertarian. In 2020, Donald Trump went on to receive the best performance for a Republican in the county's history.

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [15]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 77.6% 1,38821.4% 3831.0% 18
2016 71.5% 1,21618.8% 3209.8% 166
2012 70.3% 1,23626.8% 4722.9% 51
2008 70.4% 1,22728.2% 4921.3% 23
2004 77.3% 1,45421.9% 4110.9% 16
2000 72.3% 1,26925.8% 4521.9% 34
1996 60.3% 99531.5% 5198.3% 136
1992 52.6% 97528.0% 51919.4% 360
1988 65.9% 1,29132.6% 6381.6% 31
1984 74.4% 1,50324.2% 4881.4% 28
1980 65.9% 1,40731.6% 6752.5% 54
1976 53.3% 1,14645.4% 9751.4% 29
1972 72.5% 1,54523.3% 4964.2% 90
1968 55.4% 1,21730.9% 67813.7% 301
1964 51.3% 1,23248.3% 1,1590.4% 10
1960 61.2% 1,68638.8% 1,0680.1% 2
1956 60.8% 1,64939.1% 1,0610.0% 1
1952 63.4% 1,98836.4% 1,1420.2% 6
1948 43.7% 1,24655.8% 1,5900.5% 13
1944 54.2% 1,60445.6% 1,3500.2% 5
1940 48.7% 1,90051.0% 1,9870.3% 12
1936 38.1% 1,62561.1% 2,6050.9% 37
1932 27.0% 1,17371.6% 3,1171.5% 63
1928 61.2% 2,08138.4% 1,3060.4% 13
1924 37.8% 1,41546.3% 1,73515.9% 596
1920 54.4% 2,93042.2% 2,2733.4% 185
1916 39.9% 1,49553.2% 1,9966.9% 258
1912 31.2% 81542.9% 1,11925.9% 677

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 22, 2011. Retrieved September 30, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. "New Mexico: Consolidated Chronology of State and County Boundaries". New Mexico Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2007. Archived from the original on August 22, 2016. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  4. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on January 1, 2015. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  5. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved December 24, 2019.
  6. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  7. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  8. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  9. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  10. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  11. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 24, 2016.
  12. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 24, 2016.
  13. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 24, 2016.
  14. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 24, 2016.
  15. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 2, 2018.

Coordinates: 36°29′N103°28′W / 36.48°N 103.47°W / 36.48; -103.47